NATICK CENTER PLAN
Public Forum #2
February 10, 2016
Presentation
– Review of project
– Community feedback
– Vision
– Market analysis
– Zoning
– Connectivity
– Parking
Break...
review
½ mile “walk-shed”
TCAN Library
Major
employers:
2 miles
Modera
Residences
(40R)
Farmers
Market,
concerts, and
other
programming
MBTA Station...
RECOMMENDATIONS
How do you see
Natick Center in
5, 10, 20 years?
What regulatory
and other changes
are needed to
achieve t...
Preferences and demographics are aligning for
increasing demand of walkable neighborhoods
AGES 20-35
AGES 36-65
AGES 66+
76% of “millennials”
want to live in a
“transit-oriented”
neighborhood*
Why Natick Center?
 Transit access
 Walkable env...
community
feedback
Focus group attendees...……..
T station visit comments……...
Forum attendees………………
Survey participants……………
Email sign-up li...
Where do you live? (n=95) Where do you live? (n=754)
Natick Center
Other parts of
Natick
Outside Natick
Forum participants...
What is one thing you like about Natick Center?
0
50
100
150
200
250
Arts Station The Common and
associated
programming
(e...
Restaurants
More
housing
More
restaurants
Restaurants
Get rid of the
angle parking
We need
more parking
A parking
garage
A...
vision
Photo courtesy Jay Ball
Town Common
Farmers Mkt, Concerts,
Other Programming
Retail Stores
Small businesses
Arts
Restaurants
Unique elements
“sens...
market analysis +
recommendations
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
Grocery Store Additional
Restaurants
Pubs/Bars Cafes/Bakeries Clothing Stores Professional
O...
5 Minute Drive Time
10 Minute Drive Time
15 Minute Drive Time
5 Minute Walk Time
10 Minute Walk Time
15 Minute Walk Time
M...
Industry Summary
LOCAL
TRADE AREA
PRIMARY TRADE
AREA
10 min walk time 5 min drive time
Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink...
Market Analysis
= retail gap and potential opportunities for more retail = surplus of sales within the trade area
Step 3: ...
Step 4: Examine Office Potential for in Workforce Investment Area
Metro South/West Area Projected Employment
Industry Empl...
Market Analysis
Step 5: Examine Office potential in Natick Center
 Natick Center is not going to attract major employers
...
Step 6: Review recent residential building permits
32 29 24 26
66
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Singl...
$0
$100,000
$200,000
$300,000
$400,000
$500,000
$600,000
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 ...
1 ) Expand the Retail / Residential Market
Increase Residential Density
Marketing campaigns targeted at Commuter
Rail pa...
Market Analysis
Recommendations
Small grocery store (approximately 10,000 sq’)
-- Needs approximately 2,500 households
Eac...
2) Market Downtown Natick to attract interest
from developers, commercial establishments &
potential customers
 Create co...
3) Work with Existing Property Owners to Improve Properties
 Façade & Sign Improvement Programs
 Block by Block Strategi...
4) Support existing local businesses
 Work with current retailers to implement Retail Best
Practices
 Collaborate to pla...
5) Ensure permitting and procedures
are business friendly
• Create a streamlined permitting
process for opening a business...
recommendations
zoning
Zoning: Existing
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
Top 5 Residential choices (Forum + Survey combined)
Residential above retai...
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
Top 5 Retail/Commercial choices (Forum + Survey combined)
Residential above...
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
1
3
2
4
5
6
7
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11
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13
14
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
SECTION 1
Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Tota...
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
[A sample: Se...
Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
[A sample: Section 18]
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1...
Zoning
Build-out analysis
Example
 Many participants like the “feel” of the Clarke Building
 60% lot coverage
 3-4 stor...
Zoning
Build-out analysis
Example (continued)
 Under existing zoning, if a parcel in the DM is redeveloped:
50’ height
Re...
 Height and scale of existing zoning is line with what people
want
 Design should foster walkable neighborhood
 Interes...
Expansion of DMU and HOOP: Phasing will allow Town to assess changes
Zoning
Recommendations
Proposed DM
(near term)
Propos...
Changes to DMU:
1) Ensure better transition to Residential
 Participants want to maintain existing heights of downtown
 ...
Zoning
Recommendations
Section view
Changes to DMU
2) Make adjustments to reflect community preferences
 Raise lot coverage from 60 to 80%. (Current building...
Zoning
Recommendations
Changes to DMU
3) Make adjustments to parking provisions
Examine parking ratios to be in line with...
Affordable Housing – Changes to HOOP
 Reduce minimum lot size from 15,000 to 11,000 sq’
 Allows development of larger pa...
Affordable housing – Inclusionary Zoning
• Create Inclusionary Zoning by-law
• Would replace IHOP
• Lower threshold than I...
Residential General (RG) District
 Community wants to maintain modest, starter homes in Natick
Center
 Most lots are sma...
recommendations
connectivity
 Overall, well connected neighborhood
 Participants feel it is “walkable”
 Sidewalk coverage is very good
 Some proble...
Wide sidewalk;
parking as buffer
Building meets sidewalk for
improved ped. experience
Overhead wiring is
less desirable
De...
Connectivity: Pedestrian
Traffic Calming
Connectivity: Pedestrian
Traffic Calming
Connectivity: Pedestrian
Recommendations
 Ensure sidewalks remain in good condition
 Reduce curb cuts as development occ...
Connectivity: Bicycle
Recommendations
Bike lanes Rt 27,north of Center,
included in reconstruction plans
(FY2019 TIP)
Bike...
Connectivity: Intersections + Roadways
Recommendations
Reconstruct Marion
Street Bridge to reduce
Center congestion
Contin...
Connectivity: MBTA Station
The station and access to Boston cited as one of the top assets in Natick Center
Background
St...
recommendations
parking
Parking: Natick Center
Overview
Parking has been studied for years
Results of recent study indicate Natick Center as a
wh...
Parking: Natick Center
Recommendations
Continue focus on “parking management”
Implementation has begun with new rates an...
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Existing angle in Reverse angle Parallel
Forum Survey
Parking: Main Street
Ove...
Existing Conditions
8’ 16’ 15’ 15’ 16’ 8’
side
walk
Parking Travel
lane
Travel
lane
Parking side
walk
78’ Right of Way* * ...
Reverse Angle
8’ 16’ 15’ 15’ 16’ 8’
Side
walk
Parking Travel
lane
Travel
lane
Parking side
walk
78’ Right of Way* * Measur...
Reverse Angle
8’ 16’ 10.5’ 10.5’ 16’ 8’
Side
walk
Parking Travel
lane
Travel
lane
Parking side
walk
78’ Right of Way* * Me...
Reverse Angle with Curb Bump Outs
78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are
estimates and not to scale
Same benefits as
previou...
Parallel (no bike lanes)
21’ 7’ 11’ 11’ 7’ 21’
sidewalk Parking Travel
lane
Travel
lane
Parking sidewalk
78’ Right of Way*...
Parallel (with Bike Lanes)
16’ 7’ 11’ 11’ 7’ 16’
sidewalk Parking Travel
lane
Travel
lane
Parking sidewalk
78’ Right of Wa...
Parking: Main Street
Recommendations
Near term:
 Install curb extensions to improve pedestrian safety
(approximately $10-...
Breakout Groups
– Breakout Groups to discuss
recommendations
DRAFT Report
– Post for comments
Finalize Report
– Present...
Natick Center Plan Forum #2
of 72

Natick Center Plan Forum #2

Draft recommendations presented by Chris Kuschel of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council at the second public forum of the Natick Center Plan, February 10, 2016, Natick, MA.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Natick Center Plan Forum #2

  • 1. NATICK CENTER PLAN Public Forum #2 February 10, 2016
  • 2. Presentation – Review of project – Community feedback – Vision – Market analysis – Zoning – Connectivity – Parking Break-out groups Report-out
  • 3. review
  • 4. ½ mile “walk-shed”
  • 5. TCAN Library Major employers: 2 miles Modera Residences (40R) Farmers Market, concerts, and other programming MBTA Station redesign process Town Hall Police / Fire Dept Natick Center Cultural District P P P P P Proposed developments Recent developments
  • 6. RECOMMENDATIONS How do you see Natick Center in 5, 10, 20 years? What regulatory and other changes are needed to achieve the vision? Given market realities, is the vision achievable? How do we prioritize needed changes? NATICK CENTER PLAN COMPONENTS VISION RECOMMENDATIONS Land use / zoning, Transportation MARKET ANALYSIS IMPLEMENTATION Short / medium / long term priorities
  • 7. Preferences and demographics are aligning for increasing demand of walkable neighborhoods AGES 20-35 AGES 36-65 AGES 66+
  • 8. 76% of “millennials” want to live in a “transit-oriented” neighborhood* Why Natick Center?  Transit access  Walkable environment  Restaurants and amenities  Multi-family residences  More affordable than some neighboring communities  Proximity to Route 128 + Route 9 employers *2015 Urban Land Institute Boston/New England and MassINC Polling
  • 9. community feedback
  • 10. Focus group attendees...…….. T station visit comments……... Forum attendees……………… Survey participants…………… Email sign-up list……………… Website visits…………………. Public Outreach 14 65 130 770 235 570
  • 11. Where do you live? (n=95) Where do you live? (n=754) Natick Center Other parts of Natick Outside Natick Forum participants Survey participants 56%34% 5% 41%56% 3% 95% were not at the Forum
  • 12. What is one thing you like about Natick Center? 0 50 100 150 200 250 Arts Station The Common and associated programming (esp Farmer's Market) Walkability Library Neighborhood feel / architecture Other Survey Forum Other
  • 13. Restaurants More housing More restaurants Restaurants Get rid of the angle parking We need more parking A parking garage A parking garage Actually, parking isn’t that bad Movie theater Multifamily housing No new housing What do people want to see in Natick Center? Variety of restaurants Restaurants with outdoor seating Higher quality restaurants 55+ housing Rail trail Bike lanes Dog park Grocery store Playground
  • 14. vision Photo courtesy Jay Ball
  • 15. Town Common Farmers Mkt, Concerts, Other Programming Retail Stores Small businesses Arts Restaurants Unique elements “sense of place” Everyday needsNatick Center residents Other residents + visitors Economic Development Programs + Strategies Walkability (most important) Multi-modal transportation
  • 16. market analysis + recommendations
  • 17. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Grocery Store Additional Restaurants Pubs/Bars Cafes/Bakeries Clothing Stores Professional Offices Speciality Retail Daily Needs Survey Forum Small- medium size • Higher quality • More diverse (not pizza) Commonthemes • Healthy options • Open later Craft brewery No more banks • Hardware store • Bike shop Market Analysis What types of businesses would you like to see
  • 18. 5 Minute Drive Time 10 Minute Drive Time 15 Minute Drive Time 5 Minute Walk Time 10 Minute Walk Time 15 Minute Walk Time Market Analysis Step 1: Determine retail trade area
  • 19. Industry Summary LOCAL TRADE AREA PRIMARY TRADE AREA 10 min walk time 5 min drive time Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink $(91,456,002) $29,736,817 Total Retail $(95,490,881) $1,296,718 Total Food & Drink $4,034,878 $28,440,099 Downtown and Mixed-Use Oriented Industry Groups Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores -$1,396,508 -$387,862 Electronics & Appliance Stores $4,936,994 $17,301,409 Building Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply $2,848,147 $16,538,840 Food & Beverage Stores -$30,584,165 -$6,826,442 Health and Personal Care -$4,358,715 $6,803,712 Clothing & Clothing Accessories $4,138,253 $21,778,097 Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book and Music Stores $504,580 $3,935,270 Miscellaneous Store Retailers -$2,196,610 $1,818,016 Food Services & Drinking Places $4,034,878 $28,440,099 Market Analysis = retail gap and potential opportunities for more retail = surplus of sales within the trade area Step 2: Analyze Retail Spending Gaps/ Surpluses
  • 20. Market Analysis = retail gap and potential opportunities for more retail = surplus of sales within the trade area Step 3: Translate Spending into Potential Stores • Based on “capture rate” of potential spending • Includes potential office worker spending • Caveat 1: This is the Primary Trade Area, which is beyond Natick Center specifically • Caveat 2: This is potential demand – other factors help determine whether a business is viable Total Stores 20 Retail 11 Food + Drink 9 50,000 Approximate additional supportable retail sq’
  • 21. Step 4: Examine Office Potential for in Workforce Investment Area Metro South/West Area Projected Employment Industry Employment 2012 Projected Employment 2022 Change Level Change Percent Information 25,886 27,099 1,213 4.70% Publishing Industries (except Internet) 15,413 15,241 -172 -1.10% Telecommunications 3,270 3,029 -241 -7.40% Data Processing, Hosting and Related Services 1,772 1,798 26 1.50% Finance and Insurance 20,358 21,535 1,177 5.80% Credit Intermediation and Related Activities 5,902 6,340 438 7.40% Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 8,863 9,337 474 5.30% Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 7,207 7,653 446 6.20% Real Estate 5,682 5,988 306 5.40% Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 64,541 79,289 14,748 22.90% Management of Companies and Enterprises 23,152 24,745 1,593 6.90% Administrative/Support/Waste Management/Remediation 31,308 32,242 934 3.00% Administrative and Support Services 30,140 31,199 1,059 3.50% Waste Management and Remediation Service 1,168 1,043 -125 -10.70% Educational Services 55,089 60,140 5,051 9.20% Health Care and Social Assistance 61,647 75,190 13,543 22.00% TOTAL 289,188 327,893 38,705 13.38% Market Analysis
  • 22. Market Analysis Step 5: Examine Office potential in Natick Center  Natick Center is not going to attract major employers  Potential to several support 20-40 person firms and more local businesses Natick Coworking space
  • 23. Step 6: Review recent residential building permits 32 29 24 26 66 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Single-Family Multi-Family Market Analysis
  • 24. $0 $100,000 $200,000 $300,000 $400,000 $500,000 $600,000 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Single Family Condo All Market Analysis Step 7: Examine trends for home prices (median sales price)
  • 25. 1 ) Expand the Retail / Residential Market Increase Residential Density Marketing campaigns targeted at Commuter Rail passengers Market Analysis Recommendations
  • 26. Market Analysis Recommendations Small grocery store (approximately 10,000 sq’) -- Needs approximately 2,500 households Each icon represents 100 households -- Assumes $135 / week on groceries -- Natick Center has approximately 1,800 households -- Needs minimum 700 additional households * *This is minimum as not all existing households will change to new grocery store. As with other retail/office needs, other factors will go into whether a grocery store will choose to locate in Natick Center. Grocery store example
  • 27. 2) Market Downtown Natick to attract interest from developers, commercial establishments & potential customers  Create cohesive brand & marketing materials for downtown Natick  Identify and recruit restaurants & retail stores that may be interested in opening in downtown Natick  Provide Retail Incentives Programs to attract retailers  Work with real estate brokers  Utilize town website to post Economic Development resources Market Analysis Recommendations
  • 28. 3) Work with Existing Property Owners to Improve Properties  Façade & Sign Improvement Programs  Block by Block Strategies  Workshops & Resources Source: Beverly Main Streets Market Analysis Recommendations
  • 29. 4) Support existing local businesses  Work with current retailers to implement Retail Best Practices  Collaborate to plan additional events that attract new customers downtown  Encourage businesses to take advantage of existing resources Market Analysis Recommendations
  • 30. 5) Ensure permitting and procedures are business friendly • Create a streamlined permitting process for opening a business • Create a Natick Business Guide • Consider more flexibility in liquor licenses Source: Town of Dedham Market Analysis Recommendations
  • 31. recommendations zoning
  • 32. Zoning: Existing
  • 33. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise Top 5 Residential choices (Forum + Survey combined) Residential above retail • Streetscape and seating • 3 story • 358 votes Residential above retail • Wide sidewalks • 3.5 story • 315 votes Modest scale homes • 2-3 story • 298 votes Residential above retail • 4 story • 225 votes Modest scale homes • 2-3 story • 233 votes
  • 34. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise Top 5 Retail/Commercial choices (Forum + Survey combined) Residential above retail • Building meets lot line • 2 story • 355 votes Residential above retail* • Traditional architecture • 4-5 story • 374 votes Commercial above retail • Traditional architecture • 4 story • 343 votes Residential above retail • 2.5 story • 271 votes Commercial above retail • 3.5 story • 299 votes *This building was mislabeled as its existing use is commercial above retail; however, participants voted under the assumption that it is residential above retail.
  • 35. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
  • 36. 1 3 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise
  • 37. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise SECTION 1 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 3 3 1 2 2 3 1 15 Retail/Commercial 6 6 2 2 1 1 18 SECTION 2 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 1 1 2 Retail/Commercial 2 1 2 5 SECTION 3 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 1 2 1 2 6 Retail/Commercial 2 1 2 1 3 1 10 SECTION 4 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 3 1 4 Retail/Commercial 5 4 6 2 1 1 1 20 SECTION 5 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 9 Retail/Commercial 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 11 SECTION 6 Photo Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Total Residential 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 1 5 19 Retail/Commercial 4 1 2 3 1 1 2 14
  • 38. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 [A sample: Section 6] Retail/Commercial 1 10 Residential 12 19 Blocks between E Central and South Ave. Most votes for larger scale ground floor retail with housing above. Also ground floor retail with office above. Several votes for other housing typologies. Residential Retail/Commercial
  • 39. Zoning: Visual Preference and Mapping Exercise [A sample: Section 18] 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Retail/Commercial Residential 4 13 17 16 17 14 Area bounded by Spring, Summer, and tracks with parking lots, multi family homes, automotive, and retail. Most votes for residential above ground floor retail, also mixed use office/retail. 4 stories is most popular response. Residential Retail/Commercial
  • 40. Zoning Build-out analysis Example  Many participants like the “feel” of the Clarke Building  60% lot coverage  3-4 stories / ~55’ height  Building meets lot line
  • 41. Zoning Build-out analysis Example (continued)  Under existing zoning, if a parcel in the DM is redeveloped: 50’ height Retail Office • 30,000 sq’ lot • 20,000 sq’ building • 17% lot coverage • 54 required spaces (approx. gross 23,000 sq’) 15’ front setback 20’ rear setback 0’ side setback
  • 42.  Height and scale of existing zoning is line with what people want  Design should foster walkable neighborhood  Interested in variety of architectural standards but should be high quality; generally, allow for more contemporary architecture outside core of downtown, especially along train line  Mix of uses throughout much of Natick Center  Focus on residential above retail  Commercial activities still important  Maintain modest homes around Center (i.e., avoid McMansion-ization) Zoning Summary Points
  • 43. Expansion of DMU and HOOP: Phasing will allow Town to assess changes Zoning Recommendations Proposed DM (near term) Proposed DM (longer term) Proposed HOOP (near term) Proposed HOOP (longer term) Existing DMU Existing HOOPs
  • 44. Changes to DMU: 1) Ensure better transition to Residential  Participants want to maintain existing heights of downtown  If within 50’ of RG District, limit building height to height of nearest existing residential structure  This will ensure a better transition between districts Zoning Recommendations
  • 45. Zoning Recommendations Section view
  • 46. Changes to DMU 2) Make adjustments to reflect community preferences  Raise lot coverage from 60 to 80%. (Current buildings range from 55-100%)  Allow open space payment in lieu (similar to HOOP District)  Building must occupy at least 75% of frontage (so parking is in back)  Allow as-of-right housing for existing buildings with ground-floor retail  Change definition of “Height” to be measured at top of ceiling, which will allow for gables and other architectural elements as opposed to only flat Zoning Recommendations
  • 47. Zoning Recommendations Changes to DMU 3) Make adjustments to parking provisions Examine parking ratios to be in line with a walkable, transit- oriented neighborhood Requirements are currently higher than in other districts Make changes to requirements, based in part on results of upcoming proposals for potential garage(s) Allow for shared parking provisions Currently parking must be located within 300’ of building; this regulation should be relaxed
  • 48. Affordable Housing – Changes to HOOP  Reduce minimum lot size from 15,000 to 11,000 sq’  Allows development of larger parcels in proposed overlay areas  Still encourages consolidation of small parcels  Raise maximum lot coverage from 40% to 60%  Creates better transition between Residential and DM districts  Allows flexibility for better design  Parking requirements still need to be met  Adjust formula of Bonus use to “Gross Area divided by 1,200 ” from 1,500  Allows slightly increased number of units  E.g., 11,000 sq’ parcel could have 9 units instead of 7  Allow by Special Permit additional uses  Café, dry cleaner, etc Zoning Recommendations
  • 49. Affordable housing – Inclusionary Zoning • Create Inclusionary Zoning by-law • Would replace IHOP • Lower threshold than IHOP • “Payment in lieu of” option • Continue to ensure preserve existing affordable housing in perpetuity Zoning Recommendations
  • 50. Residential General (RG) District  Community wants to maintain modest, starter homes in Natick Center  Most lots are smaller than req. minimum  If a lot is up for development, goes to ZBA which determines whether there is adverse impact  Assess options: Monitor situation and making zoning changes as needed ZBA could potentially consider scale + quality in making determination Consider bylaw for allowing accessory-dwelling unit allowance and/or family suite provisions Zoning Recommendations
  • 51. recommendations connectivity
  • 52.  Overall, well connected neighborhood  Participants feel it is “walkable”  Sidewalk coverage is very good  Some problem intersections and cut- through streets Connectivity: Pedestrian Brick buffer between walking area and street Wide sidewalks in good condition Curb neck-out reduces pedestrian crossing distance ADA accessible Pedestrian scale lighting High visibility crosswalks (but not optimal material) Flashing crossing beacon increases safety Trees provide shade and comfort
  • 53. Wide sidewalk; parking as buffer Building meets sidewalk for improved ped. experience Overhead wiring is less desirable Deep setback with blank wall Grass buffer between walking area and street Narrower sidewalks appropriate for residential side street Lack of sidewalk adjacent to auto- centric land use Connectivity: Pedestrian
  • 54. Connectivity: Pedestrian Traffic Calming
  • 55. Connectivity: Pedestrian Traffic Calming
  • 56. Connectivity: Pedestrian Recommendations  Ensure sidewalks remain in good condition  Reduce curb cuts as development occurs  Traffic calming measures on cut-through streets Examine additional residential streets throughout Center (e.g., Plain Street) Chester Street lacks right of way for sidewalks Install speed humps: Relatively inexpensive (approximately $2,100 each) Appropriate for residential streets Speed of approximate 20 mph; shown to decrease speed on street by 20-25% Examine snow removal procedures Improve safety at identified intersections (see following section)
  • 57. Connectivity: Bicycle Recommendations Bike lanes Rt 27,north of Center, included in reconstruction plans (FY2019 TIP) Bike parking at station (implement near term even if part of long-term station redesign) Reconfigure angle-in parking (see Parking section) Secure funding and construct Rail Trail; examine options to bring to station at grade Consider bike lanes on Rt 135 using existing curb-to-curb space (7’ parking, 4.5’ bike lanes, 10.5 travel lanes) Longer term examine reconstruction options to include bicycle lanes on Rt 27, south of Center
  • 58. Connectivity: Intersections + Roadways Recommendations Reconstruct Marion Street Bridge to reduce Center congestion Continue redesign efforts for Rt 27 / Cottage St intersection -Crosswalk at Pond Street -“Don’t block intersection” box -Perform further analysis in coordination with Main Street Reduce curb radii: • North Ave (north side) • North Ave (south side) • Middlesex Ave (north side) Pedestrian beacon at Lincoln Street
  • 59. Connectivity: MBTA Station The station and access to Boston cited as one of the top assets in Natick Center Background Station accessibility has been a longstanding goal of the Town Fall 2012 Natick Town Meeting appropriated $80,000 for a feasibility study and conceptual development of a new Natick MBTA Station 2014 McMahon Associates provided design concepts Recommendations Continue working with MBTA on station redesign and securing funding Ensure that accessibility is a key component Examine feasibility of direct connection to Rail Trail
  • 60. recommendations parking
  • 61. Parking: Natick Center Overview Parking has been studied for years Results of recent study indicate Natick Center as a whole has adequate parking today:* Parking supply appears to be appropriate and adequate for short term Some blocks within the downtown are at capacity, but parking exists within 1-2 blocks of these locations The supply of parking exceeds current demand HOWEVER Many Forum + Survey participants think parking in Natick Center is a problem Future development may eventually require structured parking *Downtown Parking Strategy for Natick Town Center: Evaluations and Recommendations. Cecil Group with Nelson / Nygaard Consulting Associates, 2013
  • 62. Parking: Natick Center Recommendations Continue focus on “parking management” Implementation has begun with new rates and permit zones Install way-finding to make existing lots easier to find Review proposals from recent RFI for potential structured parking facility on two existing lots
  • 63. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Existing angle in Reverse angle Parallel Forum Survey Parking: Main Street Overview Preferred Main Street Parking Alternative 88% of Forum participants (n=44) and 68% of Survey participants (n=650) would like a change
  • 64. Existing Conditions 8’ 16’ 15’ 15’ 16’ 8’ side walk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking side walk 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale 42 spaces Dangerous for cyclists + motorists Long crossing distance Parking: Main Street Alternatives
  • 65. Reverse Angle 8’ 16’ 15’ 15’ 16’ 8’ Side walk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking side walk 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale Maintains 42 spaces Improved safety for cyclists + motorists Same crossing distance Loading/ unloading on sidewalk Concern among some residents of ease of parking Parking: Main Street Alternatives
  • 66. Reverse Angle 8’ 16’ 10.5’ 10.5’ 16’ 8’ Side walk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking side walk 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale Inclusion of bike lanes adds further safety Parking: Main Street Alternatives Bike lane Bike lane 5’ 5’
  • 67. Reverse Angle with Curb Bump Outs 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale Same benefits as previous but pedestrian crossing distance shortened approximately 15’ Parking: Main Street Alternatives 8’ 16’ 10.5’ 10.5’ 16’ 8’ Side walk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking side walk Bike lane Bike lane 5’ 5’
  • 68. Parallel (no bike lanes) 21’ 7’ 11’ 11’ 7’ 21’ sidewalk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking sidewalk 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale Far wider sidewalks Narrower travel lanes calm traffic (without impacting flow) 31 parking spaces (i.e., loss of 11) Safer for motorists + an improvement for cyclists Much reduced pedestrian crossing distance Parking: Main Street Alternatives
  • 69. Parallel (with Bike Lanes) 16’ 7’ 11’ 11’ 7’ 16’ sidewalk Parking Travel lane Travel lane Parking sidewalk 78’ Right of Way* * Measurements are estimates and not to scale Bike lane 5’ Bike lane 5’ Bike lanes greatly improve comfort + safety Sidewalks less wide than previous but ample room for seating, etc. Parking: Main Street Alternatives
  • 70. Parking: Main Street Recommendations Near term:  Install curb extensions to improve pedestrian safety (approximately $10-12K each) Pilot reverse angle parking  Can be “tested” inexpensively as a pilot using paint* Medium term:  Determine whether loss of parking spaces can be replaced  Invest in design for widened sidewalks Convert to parallel parking  Stripe bicycle lanes *As opposed to the more durable but expensive thermoplastic
  • 71. Breakout Groups – Breakout Groups to discuss recommendations DRAFT Report – Post for comments Finalize Report – Present to Board of Selectmen Stay up to date: http://www.mapc.org/natickcenterplan Next Steps

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