http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1604267-natalia-dolgova2/
Natalia Dolgova was born inSiberia in 1968 and trained as anartist in Magadan and then at theV.I. Mukhina Academy of Art i...
A face turned to the sky
As the writer Jury Rytkheu wrote inthe Russian publication CreativeSpirit, Dolgova’s work represents “amythological enviro...
Get up! A festival iscoming to our village
The light of an old oil lamp is twinkling inside a wintertent in the snowstorm-stricken tundra. To make itsflame brighter ...
An accidental witnessDan-Dan (the way of fishing. A joke
Fishing Kopalkhen (lucky hunting)
Old people of the North… Wise and naive, silent, meekand active. In general, changeable like children.Here is my Grandmoth...
A love storyAlone in the sea
Tundra (first of a series of 4 portraits)
Blue ox
Brown deer
Come back to home
Convesation
I stand on white snow. Besideme there is the sea, whisperingwith its heavy waves.This whisper is trying to tel...
A letter from home
Girls and Walruses
Toys of theGrandmothers advice giant Lolgylin
Girls and Walruses
Two women at the seashore
Kukinyaku (first triptych picture)
Lucky hunter
Mistress of the SeaThe Mother of the Sea
My husband-whale
A new day is coming
Winter 1
One summers eve in the tundra
The scoop
The woman and the whale
The woman and the whale
Three sisters
The Snow QueenIcons of Faith & Fate
Inuit religion was closely tied to a system of rituals integrated into the ...
Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)
Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)
Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)
Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)
Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)
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Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)

YOU CAN WATCH THIS PRESENTATION IN MUSIC HERE (You have a link on the first slide): http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1604267-natalia-dolgova2/ Thank you! Natalia Dolgova was born in Siberia in 1968 and trained as an artist in Magadan and then at the V.I. Mukhina Academy of Art in St. Petersburg. “I love nature and Inuit culture, so I paint people and the myths” she says.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Travel      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Forgotten Voices (Natalia Dolgova2)

  • 1. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/michaelasanda-1604267-natalia-dolgova2/
  • 2. Natalia Dolgova was born inSiberia in 1968 and trained as anartist in Magadan and then at theV.I. Mukhina Academy of Art in St.Petersburg.She has lived and worked inDenmark and now lives and worksin the picturesque village ofNetherthong in the Pennines ofYorkshire. She paints in both oilsand watercolours to bring to lifestories, legends and personalitiesfrom the places she lives. She uses avariety of techniques includingBatik and the combination ofdifferent pigments to add depthand light to her compositions. I love nature and Inuit culture, so I paint people and the myths.
  • 3. A face turned to the sky
  • 4. As the writer Jury Rytkheu wrote inthe Russian publication CreativeSpirit, Dolgova’s work represents “amythological environment offeringinspiration to the will, letting off intofree flight the magic bird of creativeimagination.” (‘The Phenomenon ofNatalya Dolgova’)Before hunting
  • 5. Get up! A festival iscoming to our village
  • 6. The light of an old oil lamp is twinkling inside a wintertent in the snowstorm-stricken tundra. To make itsflame brighter a girl is putting some dry moss into it.Threads of reindeer veins, osseous thimble, aneedle… A needlewoman puts skins for cuttingunder her knees, and tenderly flattens thews with hersweet hand. She measures with her fingers and cutswith a sharp knife.A girl sewed a kuchlanka (a kind of fur coat) andwent out into the village street. And there the best oflads saw her and fell in love with her; he lost his restand soon married her.Old craftswomen pass on their skills to young girlsand edify them; “Learn to sew perfectly, for the oneyou are in love with could be proud, not only of yourbeauty but also of your art.”Embroidery is a traditional Eskimo art. Womenembroider beads and make patterns from theleather shreds. There are motives of national poetryin every single ornament. Eskimo folklore is based ontalks with spirits.A habitual life event can also be used as a plot forfolklore song, giving an idea for a new patternornament: Evrazhka the lemming is running intundra; it is running fast. Kirginaut cannot catch upwith Evrazhka. Though there is no fasterherdswoman than Kirginaut in the whole village, shecannot reach it.The embroiderer
  • 7. An accidental witnessDan-Dan (the way of fishing. A joke
  • 8. Fishing Kopalkhen (lucky hunting)
  • 9. Old people of the North… Wise and naive, silent, meekand active. In general, changeable like children.Here is my Grandmother-Sun. When young she worked asa reindeer breeder on a state farm. She passed for asmart and skilful girl. She lived her life as if she wasstringing glass beads on thin leather string. Life flew bylike a swift-winged swan. Lo and behold! - she is an oldwoman already. She has never aimed at material values -and in fact she has never needed them. All the treasuresshe has ever had are still with her. She has had freedomand she could touch the skies with her hand; she has hadthe earth, she is gliding by so lightly as if she is carryingthe wind. This earth is fruitless and deserted, so she didnot need to struggle for it, she did not need to plough it Grandmother sunand build houses and pave streets on it. It is all tundra,coast, and the sea - nothing but an endless way. And it ismy Grandmother-Sun with her childish light thatilluminates this way.
  • 10. A love storyAlone in the sea
  • 11. Tundra (first of a series of 4 portraits)
  • 12. Blue ox
  • 13. Brown deer
  • 14. Come back to home
  • 15. Convesation
  • 16. I stand on white snow. Besideme there is the sea, whisperingwith its heavy waves.This whisper is trying to tell methat there is no way back.And in front of me a familiarfootprint in the new snow hasjust appeared.“Have they come for me? Oram I mistaken? Or is thisfootprint mistaken?”The old men say that oneshould not turn round towardsthe vibrant sound like the songof a woman who had stayed onthe shore hoping and longingfor her husband, a hunter.“I cannot counteract thestrength of my own intuition. Iturn my head. I find the answer.I see the footprints in the brightred snow.” Footprints in the snow
  • 17. A letter from home
  • 18. Girls and Walruses
  • 19. Toys of theGrandmothers advice giant Lolgylin
  • 20. Girls and Walruses
  • 21. Two women at the seashore
  • 22. Kukinyaku (first triptych picture)
  • 23. Lucky hunter
  • 24. Mistress of the SeaThe Mother of the Sea
  • 25. My husband-whale
  • 26. A new day is coming
  • 27. Winter 1
  • 28. One summers eve in the tundra
  • 29. The scoop
  • 30. The woman and the whale
  • 31. The woman and the whale
  • 32. Three sisters
  • 33. The Snow QueenIcons of Faith & Fate
  • 34. Inuit religion was closely tied to a system of rituals integrated into the daily life of the people. These rituals were simple but held to be necessary. According to a customary Inuit saying, The great peril of our existence lies in the fact that our diet consists entirely of souls. By believing that all things, including animals, have souls like those of humans, any hunt that failed to show appropriate respect and customary supplication would only give the liberated spirits cause to avenge themselves. Text and pictures: Internet Copyright: All the images belong to their authors Presentation: Sanda Foişoreanu www.slideshare.net/michaelasandaSound: Inuit - From Traditional Greenlandic Music On Eagles wings ~ Tribal winds flutes ~ Carlos Nakai

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