10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1
First Name
Surname
School or Area Office
Home Address
Post Code
E...
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Ko te Tamai...
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10013
Table of contents
Unit Standard 10013 4
Assessment Criter...
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On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to:
Outcome...
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To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in...
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Statement of Authenticity
Types of plagiarism
Using a few sente...
10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 7
Guidelines for referencing
Read the book or reading, then re-writ...
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List of definitions
Early childhood setting
Home-based services i...
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Te Whāriki is the first national curriculum for early childhood e...
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Te Whāriki - the Structure
Part A
Purpose, Structure, Principles...
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Question
Read the questions below
Word Bank
Select the correct w...
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Reading
Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 9 - 10 to help...
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Reading
Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 9 and 10.
Asse...
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Assessment Activity Three - Structure of Te Whāriki
In your own ...
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Exploring the Principles
The curriculum is about the individual ...
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Relationship Between Principles, Strands, Goals & Learning Outco...
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Reading
Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 14 and 40 - 43...
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Reading
Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 15 & 16, and 4...
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Learning Activity Two - Walking through Te Whāriki
Now you have ...
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Making Te Whāriki Meaningful
Te Whāriki becomes meaningful when ...
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Assessment Activity Five - Te Whāriki in Practice
In the table b...
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Assessment Activity Six - Te Whāriki in Play
As you have worked ...
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Assessment Activity Six - Te Whāriki in Play
A) Identify and rec...
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In your own words, explain why Te Whāriki is relevant and import...
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Partnerships - Educator, Whānau/Family
and the Wider Community
A...
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Reading
Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 39 - 43. These...
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My Reference List
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Further References and Resources
Ministry of Education (1996). T...
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Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
One
Explain th...
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POR420 10013 (Te Whariki)

POR420 10013 (Te Whariki)
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - POR420 10013 (Te Whariki)

  • 1. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1 First Name Surname School or Area Office Home Address Post Code Email Learning Guide 2016 10013 Unit Standard Explain the purpose, aspirations, structure, and relevance of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki. Version 4 | Level 3 | Credits 2 This material is under license to PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd (PE&T) and may not be reproduced or copied without written permission SignedOffice use only Achieved Date The National Certificate in Early Childhood Education & Care (Level 3) POR420
  • 2. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 210013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Ko te Tamaiti te Putake o te Kaupapa The Child - the Heart of the Matter Education Review Office 2012 2
  • 3. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 3 10013 Table of contents Unit Standard 10013 4 Assessment Criteria 5 Plagiarism and Referencing 6 Definitions 8 Background to Te Whāriki 9 Te Whāriki - the Structure 10 Exploring the Principles 15 Relationship Between Principles, Strands, Goals & Learning Outcomes 16 Partnerships - Educator, Whānau/Family and the Wider Community 25 My Reference List 27 Further References 28 Marking Criteria 29
  • 4. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 4 On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to: Outcome One Explain the purpose, aspirations, structure, and relevance of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki. Evidence Requirements 1.1 Te Whāriki is explained in terms of its purpose and aspirations. 1.2 Te Whāriki is explained in terms of its structure. 1.3 The relevance of Te Whāriki as a framework for ECE programme development is explained in terms of children’s early learning and development and building partnerships between educators and whānau/families. Learning Guide Resources You will need to obtain a copy of Ministry of Education. (1996). Te Whāriki: He Whāriki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna o Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Available at - http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/te-whariki.pdf To successfully complete this Learning Guide you are required to fully understand the purpose of Te Whāriki and how its implementation makes a difference to children’s learning and development. You will need access to an early childhood service to discuss the meaning of Te Whāriki with the people involved in the service, how Te Whāriki is used for planning, evaluation and assessment of children’s learning programmes, and how the relationship between the educator and the whānau/family is important to the child’s learning and development planning process. NZQA unit requirements 10013 Unit Standard Explain the purpose, aspirations, structure, and relevance of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki. Version 4 | Level 3 | Credits 2
  • 5. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 5 To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in all practical and written assessment activities. Use the marking criteria on the last page of this workbook to ensure you have met all the assessment requirements. You are required to meet the following criteria for successful completion: Complete all assessment activities in this Learning Guide to achievement level. Complete all practical assessments in an ECE setting (home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, play groups), and hospital-based services (paediatric playrooms). Practice and interaction with all children must be physically and emotionally safe. Provide evidence of your learning in relation to the Unit Standard in the Child Programme Journal (when appropriate). Complete Child Programme Journal entries (if applicable). Do not be limited by the space given for each response. If you choose to, you can use a computer to type your answers and paste them in the Learning Guide. Alternatively, you can use additional paper if required when writing a response and paste it in the Learning Guide. The programme is competency-based. This is defined by NZQA as “the ability to apply particular knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to the standards of performance required in specific contexts”. Your work will be graded Achieved (A) or Not Achieved (NA). If your work is deemed NA, you will be given guidance on extra work required and have further opportunities to resubmit. Assessment Criteria Icon Key Assessment Activity Icon Assessment Activities demonstrate your understanding of concepts and how to apply them when working with a child. Learning Activity Icon Learning Activities provide background learning in preparation for the assessments and support you to think about and practise new ideas. Readings Icon Readings icon indicates the textbook or article that will best help to support your learning. Website Icon Website icon indicates the additional on-line resources you can access to support your learning. Youtube Icon Youtube icon indicates there is a video you can watch to support your learning. Important Icon You need to pay particular attention to this information, and ensure you understand its meaning. All work must be completed in blue or black pen, NOT pencil or coloured gel pens.
  • 6. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 6 Statement of Authenticity Types of plagiarism Using a few sentences or paragraphs without referencing the source. Copying whole parts of a book, other publications or the internet without referencing the source. Copying another learner’s work or allowing another learner to copy your work. Tutors giving the answers to assessment tasks to learners. As learners sometimes work in group environments, it is important to ensure that the assessment is your own individual work. You acknowledge this is your own individual work by completing, signing and dating the ‘Statement of Authenticity’ below. An activity may be discussed in a team environment and examples of answers can be mentioned, however, every learner needs to contribute and participate in the group activity, recording the answers in their own words. Learners who have written exactly the same answers in their Learning Guides have committed Plagiarism. This is not acceptable as it does not show your individual competence. Please refer to your student handbook or contact your Programme Tutor to obtain access to a copy of ‘A beginners guide to plagiarism’. Plagiarism and Referencing Learner’s name Learner’s signature Date confirm that this is an original assessment and is entirely my own work. It contains no material previously published or written by another person except where I have acknowledged this in the text. I Plagiarism, or copying of another’s work without referencing, is not acceptable.
  • 7. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 7 Guidelines for referencing Read the book or reading, then re-write your understanding of it in your own words. If you want to quote a particular sentence or paragraph, you must acknowledge the author. For example: Penrose (1998) says “play is a major means by which children learn and develop” (p.7). OR “talking to and with children encourages their thinking” (Penrose, 1998, p.7). You will find the published date usually on the back of the first page of the book or on the list of readings given to you. At the end of your writing you should list all books, journals/articles or websites/web pages you have made reference to in completing this learning guide. For example: Type of Ref Example Book Penrose, P. (1998). Take another look (23rd ed.) Auckland: New Zealand Playcentre Federation. Journal / Article Stonehouse, A. (2011). The more you know, the more you see. The space for anything about early childhood, Issue no.27, Autumn 2012, 14-15. Website Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead. Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ Web page Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead (Home Based ECE Services). Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ServiceTypes/HomeBasedECEServices.aspx For further information on APA referencing, go to http://owll.massey.ac.nz/pdf/Academic-Writing-Guide.pdf
  • 8. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 8 List of definitions Early childhood setting Home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, playgroups), hospital-based service (paediatric playrooms). Young children Children between the years of birth to school entry. Three ‘broad age ranges’ are identified and the overlapping age categories are: Infant birth to eighteen months Toddler one year to three years Young child two and a half years to school entry age Educator Persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Whānau/Families Persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Definitions 8
  • 9. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 9 Te Whāriki is the first national curriculum for early childhood education in New Zealand. It was developed in the early 1990s and involved a diverse range of practitioners, with Māori perspectives forming an important part of the framework. Care was taken to include participants from all types of early childhood arrangements and from special education and cultural minorities. (Smith, 2003) A draft was sent out to all early childhood services for comments in 1993. More than 600 people and groups responded describing ways to improve the draft. Building on these ideas the final version was published in June 1996. Once published, Te Whāriki gained widespread acceptance throughout the early childhood sector nationally, and become a model for other countries developing their own curriculum. (Nuttall, 2003) The early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, explains that everything we do has an impact on learning and teaching. We use the term ‘whāriki’ to describe the day-to-day, collective weaving of curriculum for our tamariki (children). The way we weave together the distinct patterns of our curriculum defines what we do and how we do it. As members of an early childhood education service, we belong to a community of weavers, working together to provide the best possible learning and teaching for children. (Ministry of Education, 2009) Background to Te Whāriki Video One Watch this short movie clip from Anne Smith (ECE Taskforce, 2011). ECE Taskforce (2011). Essay 6: Enhancing ECE through Te Whariki. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=0PvcS474bKw
  • 10. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10 Te Whāriki - the Structure Part A Purpose, Structure, Principles, Strands and Goals; ECE in NZ; Context of ECE Curriculum; Development of Learning Capabilities of Infants, Toddlers, and Young Children; Curriculum Implementation. Part B Māori Text. Part C Principles, Strands and Goals. Part D Essential Skills and Essential Learning Area Links. Te Whāriki is divided into four sections: Part A, B, C and D, and should be read as an integrated whole. Other features of Te Whāriki are: The principles, strands and goals are common to all ECE services, but acknowledges how these are put into practice may differ from service to service. (Ministry of Education, 1996) “The English and Māori texts parallel and complement each other. The Māori curriculum is designed specifically to provide a basis for appropriate practice in ngā Kohanga reo. It is also applicable to other Māori immersion programmes. The Māori curriculum is an integral part of the document and provides a basis for bicultural early childhood education in New Zealand”. (Ministry of Education, 1996, p.10)
  • 11. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 11 Question Read the questions below Word Bank Select the correct word Answer Write your answer in the space provided What is the name of the principle that tells you a child is allowed to learn and grow independently? Learning Outcomes Strand Exploration Empowerment (Whakamana) Reflection Holistic Development (Kotahitanga) Curriculum Framework Family & Community What is the name of the principle that involves cognitive, social, cultural, physical, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of human development and is integrally interwoven? A specific area of learning and development in Te Whāriki is known as a ______________. There are five of them. What is the name of the principle that involves the wider community and is an integral part of the early childhood curriculum? What two words best describe the working theories of knowledge about the world, skills and strategies, attitudes, and expectations? What two words best describe the purpose of Te Whāriki? What is the process you are using when you are questioning your own practices in planning, developing and evaluating a child’s programme? What is the name of the Strand that talks about a child being actively involved in their environment? Learning Activity One - What Do You See? Using your copy of Te Whāriki, browse through the document parts to become more familiar with the terms used inside the document. When you are ready, complete the learning activity below. 1
  • 12. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 12 Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 9 - 10 to help you answer Assessment Activities 1 and 2. Assessment Activity One - Aspirations of Te Whāriki The aspirations (aims) to Te Whāriki are a statement about what the document sets out to achieve. In your own words explain what you think the New Zealand Curriculum Te Whāriki aims to achieve? (two points required). Aspirations of Te Whāriki 1
  • 13. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 13 Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 9 and 10. Assessment Activity Two - The purpose of Te Whāriki Identify at least three statements from pages 9 and 10 of Te Whāriki you feel best reflect the documents’ purpose. Rewrite these three statements in your own words to reflect what they mean to you. The purpose provides or gives the reason for why certain things exist. 2 Why do all Early Childhood Educationservices use Te Whāriki? Why do we have/need Te Whāriki The New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum? Why does it exist?
  • 14. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 14 Assessment Activity Three - Structure of Te Whāriki In your own words, explain how the content of Te Whāriki is structured by explaining the features of all the four parts. Part A Part B Part C Part D Part B Māori Text. Part C Principles, Strands and Goals. Part D Essential Skills and Essential Learning Area Links. Part A Purpose, Structure, Principles, Strands and Goals; ECE in NZ; Context of ECE Curriculum; Development of Learning Capabilities of Infants, Toddlers, and Young Children; Curriculum Implementation. 3
  • 15. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 15 Exploring the Principles The curriculum is about the individual child – the knowledge, skills and attitudes the child brings to their experiences, activities and events which make up their everyday life, at home or within the community. Te Whāriki is based on four principles of learning and development in early childhood: Empowerment Whakamana Holistic Development Kotahitanga Family and Community Whānau Tangata Relationships Ngā Hongonga These principles give us our underlying beliefs about how children learn and grow. They provide a foundation on which to build a quality early childhood curriculum. 15 Video Two Watch this slideshow about the principles and the five strands, of Te Whāriki. Training For You (2009). Te Whāriki Slideshow. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=zTtPCOJB7Hw
  • 16. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 16 Relationship Between Principles, Strands, Goals & Learning Outcomes In the curriculum document, the term ‘Whāriki’ is used as a metaphor for the curriculum - weaving together the principles, strands, goals and learning outcomes. All are woven together to make a framework or mat (whāriki) which forms the basis for consistent curriculum and programme planning in all early childhood services in New Zealand. The five strands and their goals arise from the four principles. Strands are the essential areas of learning and development. The principles and the strands together form the framework for the curriculum. Each strand has several goals. The goals of Te Whāriki give more detailed information on how the principles and strands can be put into practice in an early childhood setting. Goals are described in terms of learning outcomes and give examples of experiences that may be suitable for infants, toddlers, and young children. Learning Outcomes are what Te Whāriki is all about. These can be defined as the “combination of knowledge about the world, skills and strategies, attitudes, and expectations”. Children develop knowledge, skills and attitudes as a result of learning experiences, activities and events. (Ministry of Education, 1996, p.44). Contribution Goal 3 Te Whāriki, pp. 70-71 For infants Infants are included in appropriate social happenings. For toddlers There are realistic expectations about toddlers’ abilities to co-operate, take turns, or wait for assistance. For young children Children’s developing capacities and understanding about rules and social strategies are fostered through routines, such as sharing and taking turns.
  • 17. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 17 Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 14 and 40 - 43 to learn more about each of the Principles. Assessment Activity Four - Getting the Principles right! Write the name of all four principles in the table below (in both Māori and English). In your own words, give two points to show your understanding of each Principle. Principle 4 Principle Principle Principle
  • 18. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 18 Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 15 & 16, and 44 & 45. These sections discuss the strands and the goals, and how the goals and learning outcomes relate to each other. Assessment Activity Four - Strands, Goals and Learning Outcomes Write the names of the five strands (in both Maori and English), in the boxes below. Explain in your own words what each strand means to you. In the sixth box, describe in your own words how the goals and learning outcomes relate to each other. Strand 1 - Children experience an environment where: Strand 3 - Children experience an environment where: Strand 5 - Children experience an environment where: Strand 2 - Children and their families experience an environment where: Strand 4 - Children experience an environment where: What is the relationship between the Goals and the Learning Outcomes? 4
  • 19. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 19 Learning Activity Two - Walking through Te Whāriki Now you have a little bit more understanding of the Strands and Goals. Using page 50 of Te Whāriki, complete the following activity to explore the structure of one of these strands. After reading the questions for reflection on page 50, choose one example of an experience for each of the three age groups 2 Indicate what strand this page refers to _____________________________________________________________________ What goal number is referred to? __________________________________________________________________________ What is the goal? _______________________________________________________________________________________ Choose two learning outcomes that link to this goal __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Infant _____________________________________________________________________________________ Todder _____________________________________________________________________________________ Young child _____________________________________________________________________________________
  • 20. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 20 Making Te Whāriki Meaningful Te Whāriki becomes meaningful when you can apply it directly to a child. To do this successfully you need to understand a little about the stages of child development. Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 20 - 26. The areas of development are explained clearly showing “that there can be wide variations in the rate and timing of children’s growth and development and in their capacity to learn new things in new places” (p. 20). Learning Activity Three - Check out the Characteristics Te Whāriki divides early childhood years into three categories with overlapping ages. Use pages 20-26 in Te Whāriki as a guide to help you decide what age category matches the child characteristics listed. Child Characteristics Infant Birth - 18 months Toddler 1 - 3 years Young Child 2½ years - school entry Focus on the here and now Have urgent needs which demand immediate attention Can recognise a wide range of patterns and respond to humour Uses imagination to explore their own and other identities Energetic and on the move Subject to rapid changes in health and wellbeing Very vulnerable, totally dependent on adults Impulsive and can lack self control 3
  • 21. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 21 Assessment Activity Five - Te Whāriki in Practice In the table below there are 10 examples to show you what Te Whāriki looks like in practice. Provide another 10 examples of your own, taking into consideration each strand and principle that are linked to each box. Wellbeing Mana Atua Belonging Mana Whenua Contribution Mana Tangata Communication Mana Reo Exploration Mana Aoturoa Empowerment Whakamana eg Johnnie chose his own shorts and shirt today. eg Aaron knows he has the right to try all the activities at PlaySchool. eg Sian chose the sand tray today and got the buckets by herself. Holistic Development Kotahitanga eg Susie brought her teddy to Playcentre because she was feeling anxious about the new environment and Mum’s gone away for a week. eg Aaron loves to dance and sing and ‘act out’ – with himself being the central person in the role. Family & Community Whānau Tangata eg Amelia talks about PlaySchool as “My PlaySchool” eg Tina shared photos of her family holiday. eg on the trip to the maze Aaron discussed the maize and how it was like the corn that we eat. Relationships Ngā Hononga eg Amelia comforted Aaron when he fell and hurt his knee eg Manu asked David to come and play at his house after kindergarten. Principles Strands 5
  • 22. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 22 Assessment Activity Six - Te Whāriki in Play As you have worked your way through Te Whāriki, and become familiar with its principles, strands, goals and learning outcomes, you will have seen how Te Whāriki provides a framework for ECE programme development. To explain the relevance of this to children’s early learning and development complete the table below, presenting one play activity which can be implemented in an early childhood setting. Identified examples need to be taken directly from Te Whāriki. State the type of ECE service you work in by selecting (tick) one of the options below: Choose an experience and describe in detail how and what you would provide for this activity: A) Identify the Principles of Te Whāriki which your play activity relates to. B) Explain why your play activity relates to these principles. A) Identify and record the most relevant strand that your play activity relates to: B) Explain why you have chosen this strand that your play activity relates to: Centre-based Service Hospital-based Service Home-based Service 6
  • 23. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 23 Assessment Activity Six - Te Whāriki in Play A) Identify and record the most relevant goal number for your play activity: B) Explain why you have chosen this goal for your play activity: A) Identify and record the most relevant learning outcomes for your play activity: B) Explain why you have chosen this/these learning outcomes for your play activity: A) Identify and record the most relevant reflective question for your play activity: B) Explain why you have chosen this reflective question for your play activity: A) Identify and record the most relevant experience that would help meet the outcomes you have selected for your play activity: B) Explain why you chose this/these particular experiences for your play activity: 6
  • 24. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 24 In your own words, explain why Te Whāriki is relevant and important when you are planning a learning and development programme for a child. Three points required. Assessment Activity Seven - Te Whāriki and Planning Te Whāriki is relevant and important in providing a framework for children’s early learning and development. State the type of service you work in by selecting (tick) one of the options below: 7 Centre-based Service Hospital-based Service Home-based Service
  • 25. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 25 Partnerships - Educator, Whānau/Family and the Wider Community A child’s learning and development is strengthened when positive relationships/partnerships are established and actively maintained between the educator, whānau/family and wider community. It is important to consider factors such as: How we support the wellbeing of the family and community. How we respect the family, culture, knowledge and community. How we ensure there are strong connections and consistency in all aspects of the child’s life. With these considerations we can strengthen the learning partnerships, in turn strengthening the learning and development of the child. (Ministry of Education, 1996) Young children experience their world as an environment of relationships, and these relationships affect virtually all aspects of their development – intellectual, social, emotional, physical, behavioural, and moral. Harvard University, 2009 25
  • 26. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 26 Reading Using your copy of Te Whāriki, read pages 39 - 43. These pages discuss the importance of the roles adults play in nurturing the wellbeing of a child, and how building partnerships with the wider family and community are an important aspect of the nurturing process. Assessment Activity Eight - Educator and Whānau/Family Partnerships Building relationships between educators and whānau/families is very important in early childhood education and care (ECE). Te Whāriki, as a framework for ECE programme development, is relevant to building these relationships. After exploring Te Whāriki, what have you identified that supports and helps you to build relationships with whānau/families and the wider community? Four examples required. Example Learning opportunities provided by the ECE service show clear links with the child’s experiences at home and with the people they interact with. Children’s learning and development are fostered if the wellbeing of their family and community is supported. 8 What have you identified in Te Whāriki to support you in building relationships?
  • 27. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 27 My Reference List
  • 28. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 28 Further References and Resources Ministry of Education (1996). Te Whāriki: He Whāriki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna a Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Available from http://www.education.govt.nz/ assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/te-whariki.pdf Nuttall, J. (2003). Weaving Te Whāriki: Aotearoa New Zealand’s Early Childhood Curriculum Document in Theory and Practice. Wellington: New Zealand Council for Educational Research. Smith, A.B. (2003). Te Whāriki: Diversity or standardisation? Innovative aspects of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum. Education in the Early Years: International Developments and Implications for Germany Conference, Munich, 16 July. Pendergrast, M. (1984). Feathers & Fibre. A survey of traditional and contemporary Maori craft. Auckland: Penguin Books. Legislation and Conventions Education Act 1989 Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008
  • 29. 10013 POR420 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 29 Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A One Explain the purpose, aspirations, structure, and relevance of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki One – Aspirations of Te Whāriki The aspirations of Te Whāriki are explained (two examples required). 12 Two – Purpose of Te Whāriki The purpose of Te Whāriki is explained (in your own words – three statements required). 13 Three – Structure of Te Whāriki The structure of Te Whāriki is explained. The four parts (A, B, C, & D) of Te Whāriki are explained. 14 Four – Principles, Strands, Goals and Learning Outcomes of Te Whāriki The names of the four principles of Te Whāriki are stated and at least two points are given to show your understanding of each principle. The names of the five strands of Te Whāriki are stated and two points are given to show your understanding of each strand. The statement provided in the sixth box explains how the Goals and Learning Outcomes relate to each other. 17 Five – Te Whāriki in Practice Table is completed (10 examples from own early childhood setting required). 21 Six – Te Whāriki in Play Table is complete, for a play activity which can be implemented in an early childhood setting. Explanations provided show how the play activity relates to Te Whāriki principles and strands, and what the goals and learning outcomes are for the child. Explanations also show what experiences would help achieve the learning outcome and what reflective questions could be used to extend the learning. 22 Seven – Te Whāriki and Planning The importance and relevance of using Te Whāriki as a framework for programme planning is explained (three points required). 24 Eight – Educator Partnerships Explanation provided describes how Te Whāriki supports and helps you to build relationships with whānau/families and the wider community (four examples required). 26 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10013 version 4 | level 3 | credits 2 Explain the purpose, aspirations, structure, and relevance of the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki. Assessor’s signature Date achieved