10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1
Learning Guide 2016
10019
Unit Standard
Describe and contribute t...
10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 2
Those who plan one year
ahead plant flowers.
Those who plan ten y...
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10019
Table of contents
Unit Standard 10019 4
Assessment Criter...
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On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to:
Outcome...
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To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in...
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Statement of Authenticity
Types of plagiarism
Using a few sente...
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Guidelines for referencing
Read the book or reading, then re-writ...
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List of definitions
Early childhood setting
Home-based services i...
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Safe Practices
May include visual and auditory scanning, routines...
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Health and Safety in Early Childhood Services
Health and safety ...
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Reading One
Reflect on the contents of READING ONE.
Durie, M. (1...
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Learning Activity One
Using the Licensing Criteria for Home-base...
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2
Safe Environment
Play environment
Street
Transition areas
Trav...
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What is a Safe Environment?
Providing a safe environment for chi...
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How Child Proof is Your Home?
Did you know?
Motor Vehicle - De...
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Learning Activity Two - Checking Home Safety
When was the last t...
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Reading Three
Ministry of Education (2015). Licensing Criteria f...
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Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety
1 Environmental F...
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Environmental Factors Range (select one)
Whole of premises/outsi...
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Environmental Factors Range (select one)
Whole of premises/outsi...
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Environmental Factors Range (select one)
Whole of premises/outsi...
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Environmental Factors Range (select one)
Whole of premises/outsi...
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Emergencies
Emergencies can occur anytime and when you least exp...
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Assessment Activity Two - Emergencies
1. State the type of ECE...
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Communication Strategy Describe in detail how you would deal wit...
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Children aren’t being naughty
when they put themselves in danger...
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Assessment Activity Three - Checking System and Checklist
There ...
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Area
Describe what a safe environment would
look like for each a...
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Keep Watch
Children always need close supervision - even if you ...
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Assessment Activity Four - Where is the Best Spot?
1. State th...
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3. Select four safe practices from the range below and discuss ...
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Assessment Activity Four - Verifying Student’s Practise
The only...
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Handwashing is the single most important
routine in child care t...
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Assessment Activity Five - Personal Hygiene
A safe environment i...
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Type of ECE Service Age Category
One
Assessment Activity Five - ...
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Assessment Activity Six - Keeping the Environment Clean
Environm...
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Assessment Activity Six - Keeping the Environment Clean
6
Type o...
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Assessment Activity Seven - Verifying Student’s Practise
The onl...
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Assessment Activity Eight - What Would I Do?
Redirecting techniq...
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Type of ECE Service Age Category
Describe in detail your unsafe ...
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Assessment Activity Eight - What Would I Do?
8 Situation Three
D...
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Assessment Activity Eight - Verifying Student’s Practise
The onl...
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Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills
An excellent method ...
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Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler
Explain what...
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Type of ECE Service Age Category
Assessment Activity Nine - Self...
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Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills
9 Explain what you w...
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Assessment Activity Nine - Verifying Student’s Practise
The only...
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Learning Activity Three - Being a Reflective Practitioner
Look b...
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My Reference List
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Further References and Resources
Ministry of Education (1996). T...
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Further References and Resources
http://www.education.govt.nz/as...
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Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
One
Describe a...
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Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
Three
Describe...
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POR421 10019 (Safe Practices and Environments)

POR421 10019 (Safe Practices and Environments)
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
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Transcripts - POR421 10019 (Safe Practices and Environments)

  • 1. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1 Learning Guide 2016 10019 Unit Standard Describe and contribute to safe practices and a safe environment for a child in an ECE Service Version 4 | Level 3 | Credits 4 This material is under license to PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd (PE&T) and may not be reproduced or copied without written permission POR421 SignedOffice use only Achieved Date The National Certificate in Early Childhood Education & Care (Level 3) First Name Surname School or Area Office Home Address Post Code Email
  • 2. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 2 Those who plan one year ahead plant flowers. Those who plan ten years ahead plant trees. But those who plan 100 years ahead care for children. 2
  • 3. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 3 10019 Table of contents Unit Standard 10019 4 Assessment Criteria 5 Plagiarism and Referencing 6 Definitions 8 Health and Safety in Early Childhood Services 10 Safety Factors 13 What is a Safe Environment? 14 How Child Proof is Your Home? 15 Emergencies 23 Keep Watch 29 My Reference List 49 Further References 50 Marking Criteria 52
  • 4. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 4 On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to: Outcome One Describe a Safe Environment for Children in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 1.1 Factors contributing to a safe environment for children are identified and described in terms of regulatory requirements and current ECE practice. 1.2 Methods of minimising risk factors are described in relation to providing a safe environment. 1.3 Procedures for dealing with emergencies are described in terms of current ECE practice. Outcome Two Contribute to a safe environment for children in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 2.1 A checking system and checklist is employed to maintain a safe environment in accordance with current ECE practice. 2.2 Safe practices that contribute to a safe environment for children are employed and modelled. 2.3 Personal and environmental hygiene practices are employed and modelled to maintain a safe environment. Outcome Three Describe and demonstrate techniques to assist a child to use safe practices in an ECE service. Evidence Requirements 3.1 Techniques to redirect children from unsafe situations are described and demonstrated in terms of current ECE practice. 3.2 Techniques that assist children to learn safe self-care skills are described and demonstrated in terms of current ECE practice. 3.2 Techniques are described and demonstrated that assist children in choosing methods to keep themselves safe. Learning Guide Resources Essential readings are in the front pocket of this Learning Guide. Read the Learning Guide in full before commencing this workbook. To successfully complete this Learning Guide you are required to have access to a preschool child in an early childhood setting to demonstrate how you maintain a safe environment and assist the child in keeping safe. Familiarity with the child is essential, and demonstration of the required techniques must be verified by a parent/legal guardian, ECE Service Manager/Supervisor, or assessor (as applicable). NZQA unit requirements 10019 Unit Standard Describe and contribute to safe practices and a safe environment for a child in an ECE service Version 4 | Level 3 | Credits 4
  • 5. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 5 To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in all practical and written assessment activities. Use the marking criteria on the last page of this workbook to ensure you have met all the assessment requirements. You are required to meet the following criteria for successful completion: Complete all assessment activities in this Learning Guide to achievement level. Complete child observations, fulfilling all set assessment criteria. Complete all practical assessments in an ECE setting (home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, play groups), and hospital-based services (paediatric playrooms). Practice and interaction with all children must be physically and emotionally safe. Provide evidence of your learning in relation to the Unit Standard in the Child Programme Journal (when appropriate). Complete Child Programme Journal entries (if applicable). Do not be limited by the space given for each response. If you choose to, you can use a computer to type your answers and paste them in the Learning Guide. Alternatively, you can use additional paper if required when writing a response and paste it in the Learning Guide. The programme is competency-based. This is defined by NZQA as “the ability to apply particular knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to the standards of performance required in specific contexts”. Your work will be graded Achieved (A) or Not Achieved (NA). If your work is deemed NA, you will be given guidance on extra work required and have further opportunities to resubmit. Assessment Criteria Icon Key Assessment Activity Icon Assessment Activities demonstrate your understanding of concepts and how to apply them when working with a child. Learning Activity Icon Learning Activities provide background learning in preparation for the assessments and support you to think about and practise new ideas. Readings Icon Readings icon indicates the textbook or article that will best help to support your learning. Website Icon Website icon indicates the additional on-line resources you can access to support your learning. Youtube Icon Youtube icon indicates there is a video you can watch to support your learning. Important Icon You need to pay particular attention to this information, and ensure you understand its meaning. All work must be completed in blue or black pen, NOT pencil or coloured gel pens.
  • 6. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 6 Statement of Authenticity Types of plagiarism Using a few sentences or paragraphs without referencing the source. Copying whole parts of a book, other publications or the internet without referencing the source. Copying another learner’s work or allowing another learner to copy your work. Tutors giving the answers to assessment tasks to learners. As learners sometimes work in group environments, it is important to ensure that the assessment is your own individual work. You acknowledge this is your own individual work by completing, signing and dating the ‘Statement of Authenticity’ below. An activity may be discussed in a team environment and examples of answers can be mentioned, however, every learner needs to contribute and participate in the group activity, recording the answers in their own words. Learners who have written exactly the same answers in their Learning Guides have committed Plagiarism. This is not acceptable as it does not show your individual competence. Please refer to your student handbook or contact your Programme Tutor to obtain access to a copy of ‘A beginners guide to plagiarism’. Plagiarism and Referencing Learner’s name Learner’s signature Date confirm that this is an original assessment and is entirely my own work. It contains no material previously published or written by another person except where I have acknowledged this in the text. I Plagiarism, or copying of another’s work without referencing, is not acceptable.
  • 7. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 7 Guidelines for referencing Read the book or reading, then re-write your understanding of it in your own words. If you want to quote a particular sentence or paragraph, you must acknowledge the author. For example: Penrose (1998) says “play is a major means by which children learn and develop” (p.7). OR “talking to and with children encourages their thinking” (Penrose, 1998, p.7). You will find the published date usually on the back of the first page of the book or on the list of readings given to you. At the end of your writing you should list all books, journals/articles or websites/web pages you have made reference to in completing this learning guide. For example: Type of Ref Example Book Penrose, P. (1998). Take another look (23rd ed.) Auckland: New Zealand Playcentre Federation. Journal / Article Stonehouse, A. (2011). The more you know, the more you see. The space for anything about early childhood, Issue no.27, Autumn 2012, 14-15. Website Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead. Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ Web page Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead (Home Based ECE Services). Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ServiceTypes/HomeBasedECEServices.aspx For further information on APA referencing, go to http://owll.massey.ac.nz/pdf/Academic-Writing-Guide.pdf
  • 8. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 8 List of definitions Early childhood setting Home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, playgroups), hospital-based service (paediatric playrooms). Young children Children between the years of birth to school entry. Three ‘broad age ranges’ are identified and the overlapping age categories are: Infant birth to eighteen months Toddler one year to three years Young child two and a half years to school entry age Educator Persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Risk Factors May include health and safety, inappropriate behaviour identified as dangerous to the young child, high child to adult ratios, number of young children available space, cultural insensitivity, premises and facilities (Building Warrant of Fitness, Resource Consent, Code of Compliance, Policies and Procedures). Safe Environmental Factors May include play environment, transition areas, indoor and outdoor areas, toilet area, street, vehicle use, storage. Emergencies May include civil emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, accidents, fire, chemical spillage, civil disputes; potential criminal acts such as hold-ups, kidnapping, terrorism; pandemics. Self-Care Skills May include personal hygiene, sun safety, road safety, water safety, play safety. Definitions 8
  • 9. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 9 Safe Practices May include visual and auditory scanning, routines, focus on high risk areas, positioning, sensitivity towards cultural practices. Personal Hygiene Practices May include toileting, hand washing, coughing and sneezing, dental hygiene (brushing teeth and flossing), bathing, hair care (washing, brushing and combing hair, and haircuts), laundering (wearing and washing clothes). Environmental Hygiene Practices May include preparation, handling, and consumption of food; toilet areas; sleeping areas; spills; resources. Employed To make use of (a checking system and checklist is used (employed) to maintain a safe environment). Modelling An educator, shows by example the practices and behaviour required, allowing children to learn new behaviours without the trial and error of doing things for themselves (ie personal hygiene practices are modelled so the child can see what is safe). First Aid Help given to a sick or injured person until full medical treatment is available. 9
  • 10. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10 Health and Safety in Early Childhood Services Health and safety in ECE services is not just about safeguarding children from illness, infections and unsafe practices. It is also about ensuring the health and wellbeing of the children we care for is considered from a wider more holistic perspective rather than just from a regulatory viewpoint. ‘Te Whare Tapa Wha’, the four cornerstones of Maori Health, is a holistic model that requires all four dimensions of health (mental, physical, spiritual and family health) to be balanced for wellbeing to exist. te taha hinengaro mental health te taha whānau family health te taha wairua spiritual health te taha tinana physical health (Ministry of Health, 1997). Taha Tinana Taha Wairua Taha Whānau Taha Hinengraro TE WHARE TAPA WHA Maori Health Model | Hauara Maori Taha Tinana Taha Wairua Taha Whānau Taha Hinengraro When educators are considering the health of their service they should consider “the service as a whole, together with the health of groups and individuals – children, staff, parents, caregivers, family and whānau” (Ministry of Health, 1997, p.6).
  • 11. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 11 Reading One Reflect on the contents of READING ONE. Durie, M. (1982). Careersnz: mana rapuara Aotearoa (Te Whare Tapa Wha). Retrieved from http://www.careers.govt.nz/educators-practitioners/career- practice/career-theory-models/te-whare-tapa-wha/ Reading Three Ministry of Education (2015). Licensing Criteria for Home-based Education and Care Services 2008. Early Childhood Education Curriculum Framework, as amended May 2015. Retrieved from http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/Licensing-criteria/Home-based-ECE-services/ HomeBased2008LicensingCriteriaHomBasedEducationAndCareBooklet.pdf Watch this short movie clip - it explains each of the cornerstones and provides examples. Marsden, D. (2014). Te Whare Tapa Wha. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlMitK8I8IM Watch this short movie clip about ‘ Te Whare Tapa Wha’ and how it is applied to an adult learning perspective. The National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults (2012). Te Whare Tapa Wha. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Kpj9N-qHc You might want to visit the Ministry of Health website to take another look at some other models of health. Ministry of Health (2012). Maori Health Models. Retrieved from http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/ populations/maori-health/maori-health-models Visit the CareerNZ website to take another look at their interactive model of Te Whare Tapa Wha. Retrieved from https://www.careers.govt.nz/educators-practitioners/career-practice/career-theory-models/te- whare-tapa-wha/
  • 12. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 12 Learning Activity One Using the Licensing Criteria for Home-based Education and Care Services 2008, identify three regulations and criteria that match the Te Whare Tapa Wha dimensions. An example has been provided for each of the cornerstones of Māori health. See what examples you can come up with. Example Reg 46/HS29: All practicable steps are taken to protect children from exposure to inappropriate material (for example, of an explicitly sexual or violent nature). Example Reg 47/GMA2: Information is provided to parents about: how they can be involved in the service; any fees charged by the service; the amount and details of the expenditure of any Ministry of Education funding received by the service; and any planned reviews and consultation. Example Reg 43/C7: The service curriculum is inclusive, and responsive to children as confident and competent learners. Children’s preferences are respected, and they are involved in decisions about their learning experiences. Example Reg 45/PF12: There is a safe hygienic place for children attending to sit when eating. Te taha hinengaro Psychological health Te taha tinana Physical health Te taha whānau Family health Te taha wairua Spiritual health 1
  • 13. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 13 2 Safe Environment Play environment Street Transition areas Travelling in vehicles Indoor/outdoor flow Toilet/bathroom/kitchen - home Plants Excursions Now that we have looked at ECE from a health and wellbeing perspective, we can explore what safety factors are applicable to an ECE environment. Knowing our environment, the ability to identify risks that make the environment unsafe, and identifying strategies we can teach children on how to keep safe, helps us maintain the equilibrium between health and wellbeing for children to learn and grow. As you complete this learning guide, you need to consider the following: Safety Factors Safe Practice Visual and auditory scanning Routines Checklist systems Focus on high risk areas Position of self in relation to children Appropriate cultural practices Self Care Skills Personal hygiene Water safety Sun safety Road safety Play safety Fire Safety Risk Factors Hygiene practices Safe environment Cultural insensitivity Availability of space Inappropriate behaviour Identified as dangerous to the young child High child-to-adult ratios Numbers of young children in a particular space
  • 14. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 14 What is a Safe Environment? Providing a safe environment for children is a priority of all adults. Young children are usually unaware of the extent of dangers in the environment. They are keen to explore everything they encounter and this curiosity involves touching and tasting objects which could be poisonous or unhygienic. For the purposes of this Learning Guide, the focus will be on safety within the home setting and community. Safe practice by the adult is the key to minimising risk of accident or harm to a young child. The vigilance of the adult to use scanning techniques, being consistent with routines and boundary setting, as well as allowing each child to be treated as they would like to be treated makes for a happy and safe environment.
  • 15. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 15 How Child Proof is Your Home? Did you know? Motor Vehicle - Deaths: an average of 16 children, aged 0 – 14 years, die each year as a passenger in a motor vehicle - the single largest cause of child injury deaths - with 38% being preschoolers. Falls - Children aged 0 – 4 years are most commonly seriously injured by falling from one level to another (e.g. down stairs, off furniture, out of windows, off balconies, off playground equipment, and whilst being carried by someone) Drowning - primary situations of drownings of children aged 0 – 4 years are: 42% “home pools” and 28% “domestic” (i.e. household bath, bucket) Posioning - Of the average 366 hospitalizations per year due to unintentional poisoning of children under 15 years, 80% are aged 0 – 4 years. Children aged 1, 2, and 3 years are by far the most at risk. Burns - Hot drinks are the #1 cause (and excessively hot water in baths, showers, sinks are the #2 cause) of burn injuries and hospitalisations among children under 5 years old. Cutting Injuries - Over 100 children, aged 0 – 4 years, are admitted to hospital overnight each year with cutting or puncture injuries - over 50% are foot injuries after standing on something sharp. Kiwi Families, 2014 Check out the interactive home safety guide by Raising Children Network - it provides a fun way for your to look at safety in the home for a range of age categories. Raising Children Network (2006-2015). Home Safety Interactive Guide. Retrieved from http://raisingchildren. net.au/home_safety/home_safety.html
  • 16. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 16 Learning Activity Two - Checking Home Safety When was the last time you crawled around your home on your hands and knees? Probably not since you were a child. It’s now time to try it again! An adult’s everyday environment is a new adventure to a toddler, which is why it is crucial to get down on the floor and see things from a toddler’s perspective. So, get down on the floor to a toddler’s level, and see if you can identify two safety issues in your home environment. 2 Reading Two Sarney, E. (2001). On the safe side. Little Treasures, October/November, p.89 CRAWL around the rooms to see what they will experience. What other safety aspects can you notice? Safety Issues 1. 2.
  • 17. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 17 Reading Three Ministry of Education (2015). Licensing Criteria for Home-based Education and Care Services 2008. Early Childhood Education Curriculum Framework, as amended May 2015. Retrieved from http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/Licensing-criteria/ Home-based-ECE-services/HomeBased2008LicensingCriteriaHomBasedEducationAndCareBooklet.pdf Reading Six Use READING THREE, the Home Based Licensing Criteria, or the licensing criteria that relates to your type of service and READING SIX, the ECE (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008, to complete this Assessment Activity. HomeBased2008LicensingCriteriaHomBasedEducationAndCareBooklet.pdf Reading Seven PIHC (2015). Licensing Requirements Termly Checks. We tell children how to be and they keep mirroring what we are. Children learn by example, if we are to raise happy intelligent children we must bring to wholeness the models they are following. Joseph Chilton Pearce Keeping your children safe can be tricky as ‘exploring’ is an important part of their development. Being curious, they will put things in their mouths, climb, open doors, and reach up and touch everything they possibly can. It is better to make them safe, so they can enjoy this time in their lives. You can do this by making their environment safe and teaching them how to keep safe. (Ministry of Social Development, 2004) When using the home as an early childhood setting, it is a legal requirement to meet the Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. Find out more by reading the regulations.
  • 18. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 18 Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety 1 Environmental Factors and Minimising Risk There are four tables you need to complete for this assessment activity. 1. State the type of ECE service you provide (centre-based, home-based, or hospital-based), and the age category (infant, toddler or young child) for the child/ren you care for. 2. From the list of environmental factors at the top of each table, select (tick) one environmental factor, describe what this type of environment would look like if it was safe, and link it to the appropriate regulation criteria. Hint! - the regulations will be very helpful here. 3. For each environmental factor you select, you also need to identify and describe two risk factors and describe two different methods you would use to minimise each risk factor (the first table has been completed as an example for you). Environmental Factors Range (select one) Whole of premises/outside Toilet, hand/body wash, nappy change Play environment  Kitchen/dining area Sleep Child health Office documentation Describe the safe environment. What type of things would you see if this environment was safe? The design and layout of premises support the provision of different types of indoor and outdoor experiences; and include quiet spaces, areas for physically active play, and space for a range of individual and group learning experiences appropriate to the number, ages, and abilities of children attending. The design and layout of the premises support effective adult supervision so that children’s access to indoor and outdoor spaces is not unnecessarily limited. A variety of equipment and materials is provided that is appropriate for the learning and abilities of the children attending. If infants, toddlers or children not walking attend, there are safe and comfortable (indoor and outdoor) spaces for them to lie, roll, creep, crawl, pull themselves up, learn to walk, and to be protected from more mobile children. Identify and state what ECE regulations/licencing criteria directly link to the environment you have stated above. 2008 Reg 45: PF1, PF2, PF4, PF11 (Premises & Facilities); 2008 Regs: schedule 2 (Adult Child Ratios - minimum), schedule 4 (Activity Spaces - minimum) Two Risk Factors Minimising Risk (two different methods required for each risk factor) 1. Broken equipment and materials could injure the child. Equipment is checked prior to use, any broken equipment is replaced. At the end of the day equipment is stored appropriately. 2. After heavy rain substantial surface water is visible on the ground. Rope off the area of heavy water. Constant supervision outside. Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler Example
  • 19. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 19 Environmental Factors Range (select one) Whole of premises/outside Toilet, hand/body wash, nappy change Play environment Kitchen/dining area Sleep Child health Office documentation Describe the safe environment. What type of things would you see if this environment was safe? Identify and state what ECE regulations/licencing criteria directly link to the environment you have stated above. Two Risk Factors Minimising Risk (two different methods required for each risk factor) 1. 2. Type of ECE Service Age Category One Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety 1
  • 20. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 20 Environmental Factors Range (select one) Whole of premises/outside Toilet, hand/body wash, nappy change Play environment Kitchen/dining area Sleep Child health Office documentation Describe the safe environment. What type of things would you see if this environment was safe? Identify and state what ECE regulations/licencing criteria directly link to the environment you have stated above. Two Risk Factors Minimising Risk (two different methods required for each risk factor) 1. 2. Type of ECE Service Age Category Two Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety 1
  • 21. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 21 Environmental Factors Range (select one) Whole of premises/outside Toilet, hand/body wash, nappy change Play environment Kitchen/dining area Sleep Child health Office documentation Describe the safe environment. What type of things would you see if this environment was safe? Identify and state what ECE regulations/licencing criteria directly link to the environment you have stated above. Two Risk Factors Minimising Risk (two different methods required for each risk factor) 1. 2. Type of ECE Service Age Category Three Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety 1
  • 22. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 22 Environmental Factors Range (select one) Whole of premises/outside Toilet, hand/body wash, nappy change Play environment Kitchen/dining area Sleep Child health Office documentation Describe the safe environment. What type of things would you see if this environment was safe? Identify and state what ECE regulations/licencing criteria directly link to the environment you have stated above. Two Risk Factors Minimising Risk (two different methods required for each risk factor) 1. 2. Type of ECE Service Age Category Four Assessment Activity One - Environmental Safety 1
  • 23. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 23 Emergencies Emergencies can occur anytime and when you least expect it. Young children are especially vulnerable during emergencies. For these reasons, licensed ECE programmes are required by law to have policies, procedures and plans in place to minimise confusion and trauma if and when an emergency occurs. Please refer to: Ministry of Education (2010). Emergency management and traumatic incidents – The guide. Retrieved from http://www.education.govt.nz/ assets/Documents/School/Traumatic-incidents-and-emergencies/ManagingEmergenciesandTraumaticIncidents-TheGuide.pdf http://www.getthru.govt.nz/disasters St John (N.D.). First Aid Library. Retrieved from http://www.stjohn.org.nz/First-Aid/First-Aid-Library/ Falls and fractures Burns Accidental poisoning Earthquake Fire Hygiene hazards Contagious disease outbreak Near drowning Cuts Choking Floods
  • 24. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 24 Assessment Activity Two - Emergencies 1. State the type of ECE service you provide (centre-based, home-based or hospital-based) and the age category of the child/ren you care for (infant, toddler or young child). 2. Identify four emergencies that may occur in your ECE setting. The emergencies could be from the list on the previous page, or they can be other emergencies you have thought of. 3. Describe in detail how you would deal with the emergency, including relevant first aid and ECE practices and requirements. An example has been completed for you. 2 Identify the Emergency Describe in detail how you would deal with this emergency, including any relevant first aid and ECE practices. Example Choking Example Infant Open infant’s mouth and check for foreign body – remove any obstructions you can see. If alone, take the infant with you to the phone and dial 111. Place the infant in a head downwards position across the rescuer’s lap/thigh. Support the infants head and give five back blows, checking in between each back blow to see if obstruction has been dislodged. If obstruction has not been dislodged, turn the infant over and give five chest thrusts, checking in between each chest thrust to see if the obstruction has been dislodged. If the obstruction is still not relieved, continue alternating five back blows with five chest thrusts until ambulance arrives. Child/Adults may be treated in a sitting or standing position - Ask “are you choking?” If they attempt to clear themselves do not interfere. If they cannot answer give five back blows, checking in between each back blow to see if the obstruction has been dislodged. If this does not work perform chest thrusts, again checking in between each chest thrust to see if the obstruction has been dislodged. If the obstruction is still not relieved, continue alternating five back blows with five chest thrusts until ambulance arrives. Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler Example
  • 25. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 25 Communication Strategy Describe in detail how you would deal with this emergency, including any relevant first aid and ECE practices. 1. 2. 3. 4. Type of ECE Service Age Category Assessment Activity Two - Emergencies 2
  • 26. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 26 Children aren’t being naughty when they put themselves in danger. They need to learn about ways to keep safe as they explore their world. (Ministry Of Social Development, 2004, P.1)
  • 27. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 27 Assessment Activity Three - Checking System and Checklist There are a number of checks an educator needs to complete on a daily basis to ensure the environment is free from hazards. If hazards are unable to be eliminated or isolated, steps should be taken to minimise the risks. This can be achieved by checking your environment daily using such techniques as scanning or using a predefined checklist. You will be required to use the checking system and checklist in your own ECE setting and have this verified by a parent, a service supervisor, a supervising adult, or an assessor. There are a number of daily checks an Educator needs to complete prior to children arriving in care. 1. State the type of ECE service you provide (centre-based, home-based or hospital-based) and the age category (infant, toddler, young child) of the child/ren you care for. 2. For each area listed, state what you observe to confirm the area is safe. 3. Identify at least one potential hazard per area, and state what action you would take to minimise the risk to children. The first one has been completed as an example for you. 3 Area Describe what a safe environment would look like for each area What hazards are you checking for in each area? What would you do to minimise the risk? Gates/Fences Example Gates secured and locked Example Hazard: A visitor may call and leave the gate open Action: Put a sign on the gate ‘please shut gate’ Rubbish in Play Area Hazard: Action: Sand pits Hazard: Action: Bark areas Hazard: Action: Swings Hazard: Action: Movable equipment Hazard: Action: Type of ECE Service Age Category
  • 28. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 28 Area Describe what a safe environment would look like for each area What hazards are you checking for in each area? What would you do to minimise the risk? Poisonous Plants Hazard: Action: Sheds Hazard: Action: Water Hazards Hazard: Action: Rubbish Bins Hazard: Action: Hazardous Substances Hazard: Action: Kitchen/Toilets Storeroom Hazard: Action: Play Area Hazard: Action: Electrical Hazards eg sockets Hazard: Action: Heating/Fires Hazard: Action: Paths/Driveways Hazard: Action: Assessment Activity Three - Checking System and Checklist 3 Verifier’s name Checked and Signed by Supervisor/Parent/Adult Date
  • 29. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 29 Keep Watch Children always need close supervision - even if you have done all you can to create a safe environment in the home. Sometimes the simplest and most innocent things around the home can cause injury – things we all take for granted (ACC, 2000). The Readings provide ideas for precautions you can take to keep the children safe. Reading Four Minett, P. (2001). Childcare & development (4th ed). (pp.300-303). London: Hodder & Stoughton. Reading Five Burge, K. (2008). Disaster in a cup. Little Treasures, Dec 08/Jan 09, 69-70. ‘Scanning’ is an effective skill to develop Scanning as an effective skill means: Positioning yourself to ALWAYS see the children. Using your eyes, look up from interactions with the children often. Using your ears to be aware of the usual noise levels and react to any changes. It is essential to scan the environment regularly Look behind and around you frequently, and watch the children’s every move to preempt any potential accidents. Children are creative and may find new ways to use equipment to challenge themselves. Arrange the play space and equipment for easy supervision. Be ready to react to any problem or potential problem.
  • 30. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 30 Assessment Activity Four - Where is the Best Spot? 1. State the type of ECE service you provide (centre-based, home-based or hospital-based), and the age category of children you work with (infant, toddler or young child). 2. Choose either the indoor or outdoor environment of your ECE service to sketch. Mark where you would position yourself to ensure a safe environment. 4 Type of ECE Service Age Category If children are here I would need to move Indoor example door onto deck Kitchen Lounge sitting here Dining Grass View from decking tree m ove to here Outdoor example Sandpit sitting here Deck Boundary Fence Swings steps Driveway
  • 31. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 31 3. Select four safe practices from the range below and discuss how they apply to the environment you sketched on the previous page. Assessment Activity Four - Where is the Best Spot? 4 Safe practices (select four) Visual and auditory scanning Routines High Risk Area Positioning Sensitivity towards cultural practices Discuss how they apply to the environment you sketched on the previous page
  • 32. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 32 Assessment Activity Four - Verifying Student’s Practise The only way children are kept healthy and safe is by putting the things you have learned into practice in a real Early Childhood Education work environment. You are required to obtain verification (a signature) from within your own ECE service from a parent, service supervisor, supervising adult or an assessor. This verification confirms you have employed and modelled the four safe practices you described in Assessment Activity 4, in your own ECE service. 4 Verification Form Verifier’s name Signature Date has employed and modelled the four safe practices described in Assessment Activity 4, in their own ECE service. I can verify Learner’s name
  • 33. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 33 Handwashing is the single most important routine in child care that will help prevent the spread of infection. (NHMRC, 1997, CITED IN MATHEWS, 2001) 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 33
  • 34. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 34 Assessment Activity Five - Personal Hygiene A safe environment includes having a home which is healthy and hygienically clean, as it is necessary to minimise the risk of adversely affecting others. Personal hygiene practices refer to those safe practices or routines children are involved in when toileting, handwashing, coughing and sneezing, dental hygiene (brushing teeth and flossing), bathing, hair care (washing, brushing and combing hair, and haircuts), laundering (wearing and washing clothes), which keep them and other children healthy when attending the ECE service. 1. Select two personal hygiene practices you will use in your own ECE service and state at least three points for each practice that shows your understanding of how you would maintain the appropriate health and safety hygiene practices. 2. Identify two regulations from the ECE regulations and licensing criteria that your personal hygiene practice relates to. 3. Compare your description of the personal hygiene practice with the identified regulation. 4. State at least two points that you have not already described. You will be required to employ (use) and model the two personal and hygiene practices you have described in your own ECE setting and have this verified by a parent, a service supervisor, supervising adult, or an assessor. 5 Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler Example Personal Hygiene Caring for sick children Check before caring for a child, if s/he has had any infectious diseases or infections that may put other children at risk. The child that is unwell must be able to rest away from other children while still being supervised (minimising the spread of infection). Medicine is not administered to a child unless the parent has provided written consent to the service to do so. Regulation/Criteria Reg 46/HS23-26, Child health and wellbeing Reg 45/PF14, Sanitary Facilities Points not already described Immediate medical assistance (if required), and notify the parent or caregiver. Medicines are stored securely, thrown away or sent home with a parent. Staff have sufficient information and have had adequate training to administer the medication. Any sick child is able to rest well away from food areas.
  • 35. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 35 Type of ECE Service Age Category One Assessment Activity Five - Personal Hygiene 5 Two Personal Hygiene Regulation/Criteria Points not already described Personal Hygiene Regulation/Criteria Points not already described
  • 36. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 36 Assessment Activity Six - Keeping the Environment Clean Environmental hygiene practices refer to those safe practices used when preparing, handling, and consuming food; the cleaning and maintenance of toilet areas; sleeping areas; spills; and resources. 1. Select the type of ECE service your provide (centre-based, home-based or hospital-based) and the age category (infant, toddler or a young child) of the child/ren you provide care for. 2. Select two environmental hygiene practices you will use in your own ECE service and state at least three points for each practice that shows your understanding of how you would maintain the appropriate health and safety hygiene practices. 3. Identify two regulations from the ECE regulations and licensing criteria that your environmental hygiene practice relates to. 4. Compare your description of the environmental hygiene practice with the identified regulation. 5. State at least two points that you have not already described. 6. You will be required to employ (use) and model the hygiene practices you have described in your own ECE setting and have this verified by a parent, a service supervisor, supervising adult, or an assessor. 6
  • 37. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 37 Assessment Activity Six - Keeping the Environment Clean 6 Type of ECE Service Age Category Regulation/Criteria Points not already described Environmental Hygiene One Environmental Hygiene Two Regulation/Criteria Points not already described
  • 38. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 38 Assessment Activity Seven - Verifying Student’s Practise The only way children are kept healthy and safe is by putting the things you have learned into practice in a real Early Childhood Education work environment. You are required to obtain verification (a signature) from within your own ECE service from a parent, service supervisor, supervising adult or an assessor. This verification confirms you have employed and modelled the two personal hygiene and two environmental hygiene practices you described in Assessment Activity 5 and 6, in your own ECE service. 7 Verification Form Verifier’s name Signature Date has modelled two personal hygiene and two environmental hygiene practices as described in Assessment Activity 5 & 6, in their own ECE service. I can verify Learner’s name
  • 39. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 39 Assessment Activity Eight - What Would I Do? Redirecting techniques are strategies that can be used by those people caring for young children to divert the young child’s attention away from a dangerous situation. Redirecting techniques can also be used to intervene in times of conflict or when situations are deemed to be unacceptable. They are used primarily to distract young children from a situation that is unacceptable or dangerous and get them involved in more acceptable situations that are safe. As the educator, consider what redirecting techniques you have used when dealing with the children you care for. 1. Identify and describe three different unsafe situations you would need to redirect the child/ren so they are safe. 2. Describe how you would safely redirect them (two points are required for each situation). An example has been provided for you. 8 Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Young Child/Infant/Toddler Situation Frankie, 20-months old is feeding the ducks, near the lake. Frankie often chases the ducks, however, there is a downward slope running directly towards the lake. How would you redirect Frankie so he is safe? (two points required) I would place myself between Frankie and the lake at all times so that if Frankie starts to run I am in a position to stop him, turn him around and redirect him away from the lake. Talk to Frankie about staying close, or hold his hand and chase the ducks together. Throw the bread away from the lake so the ducks move away from the water. Doing this will ensure Frankie is positioned with his back towards the water. Example Scenario
  • 40. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 40 Type of ECE Service Age Category Describe in detail your unsafe situation Assessment Activity Eight - What Would I Do? 8 Situation One Describe in detail your unsafe situation Situation Two
  • 41. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 41 Assessment Activity Eight - What Would I Do? 8 Situation Three Describe in detail your unsafe situation
  • 42. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 42 Assessment Activity Eight - Verifying Student’s Practise The only way children are kept healthy and safe is by putting the things you have learned into practice in a real Early Childhood Education work environment. You are required to obtain verification (a signature) from within your own ECE service from a parent, service supervisor, supervising adult or an assessor. This verification confirms you have demonstrated the redirecting techniques for the situations described in Assessment Activity 8, in your own ECE service. 8 Verification Form Verifier’s name Signature Date has demonstrated the redirecting techniques for the situations described in Assessment Activity 8, in their own ECE service. I can verify Learner’s name
  • 43. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 43 Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills An excellent method of keeping children safe is to model and discuss self-care skills, giving them the ability to choose ways to keep themselves safe. Modelling safe practices is an ideal way to empower children. 9 Teaching Safe Practices When working with a child there are many routines eg bathing, toileting, dressing, sun safety, water safety that give you opportunities to teach safe practice. Select three from your own experience. Think about how you keep the child safe while involved in the routine, and how you assist the child to learn self-care skills, this will involve considering the child’s age and safety aspects of the routine. This assessment is about the child’s independence around self-care and safety, during routines. As an educator you will need to choose techniques that will start to develop the independence around the choices the child makes within these routines (eg questioning, offering). (The first one has been completed for you as an example). 1. State the type of ECE service you provide (centre-based, home-based or hospital- based), and the age category (infant, toddler, young child) for the child/ren you care for. 2. You will be required to demonstrate the three different routines and the two techniques in your own ECE setting and have this verified by a parent, a service supervisor, supervising adult, or an assessor. Reading Four Check Reading Four Minett, P. (2001). Childcare & development (4th ed.) (pp. 300-303). London: Hodder & Stoughton, for further ideas on modelling safe practices.
  • 44. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 44 Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler Explain what you would do to prepare for this routine to make them safe. What do you do to demonstrate (role model) and promote self-care skills? List two things the child does to keep themselves safe at each stage of the routine Routine: Washing Hands Hold their hands in yours and wash their hands with your hands. Model the process alongside the child. Sing a song while washing hands eg this is the way we wash our hands, wash our hands, wash our hands... Place soap on their hands, rub/wash hands independently. Dry hands independently. Wash your hands under clean running water. Use warm water if available. Put soap on your hands and wash for 20 seconds. Liquid soap is best. Rub hands together until the soap makes bubbles. Rub on both sides of hands, in between fingers and thumbs, and round and round both hands. Rinse all the soap off under clean running water. Use warm water if available. Dry your hands all over for 20 seconds. Using a paper towel is best (or, if at home, a clean dry towel). Example Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills 9
  • 45. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 45 Type of ECE Service Age Category Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills 9 Explain what you would do to prepare for this routine to make them safe. What do you do to demonstrate (role model) and promote self-care skills? List two things the child does to keep themselves safe at each stage of the routine Routine: Routine:
  • 46. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 46 Assessment Activity Nine - Self-Care Skills 9 Explain what you would do to prepare for this routine to make them safe. What do you do to demonstrate (role model) and promote self-care skills? List two things the child does to keep themselves safe at each stage of the routine Routine:
  • 47. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 47 Assessment Activity Nine - Verifying Student’s Practise The only way children are kept healthy and safe is by putting the things you have learned into practice in a real Early Childhood Education work environment. You are required to obtain verification (a signature) from within your own ECE service from a parent, service supervisor, supervising adult or an assessor. This verification confirms you have demonstrated the three techniques you described in Assessment Activity 9, to assist children in learning safe self-care skills, and demonstrated the two techniques described that will assist children in choosing methods to keep themselves safe in your own ECE service. 9 Verification Form Verifier’s name Signature Date has demonstrated the safe self-care skill techniques and the methods used to assist children in keeping themselves safe described in Assessment Activity 9 in their own ECE service. I can verify Learner’s name
  • 48. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 48 Learning Activity Three - Being a Reflective Practitioner Look back through this Learning Guide and reflect on new knowledge you have gained. Jot down five key points you have learned. 3 Health and safety is about being aware of your environment, understanding infants, toddlers and young children’s growth and development.
  • 49. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 49 My Reference List
  • 50. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 50 Further References and Resources Ministry of Education (1996). Te Whariki: He Whariki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna a Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Ministry of Education (2008). Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008. Wellington: New Zealand. Ministry of Education (2010). Managing emergencies and traumatic incidents – The guide. Wellington: New Zealand. Ministry of Education (2011). Early Childhood Education Services. Emergency planning and guidance: Civil Defence Emergency Management Best Practice Guide [BPG 6/11]. Wellington: New Zealand. Ministry of Health (1997). Nga Kupu Oranga Healthy Messages: A health and safety resource for early childhood services. Wellington: New Zealand. Ministry of Social Development (2004). Strategies with kids/Information for parents [S.K.I.P]” Keeping kids safe. Wellington: New Zealand. New Zealand Teachers Council (2004). Code of Ethics for Registered Teachers Code of Ethics. Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Inc (2012). Thriving Under 5. Auckland: New Zealand. Legislation and Conventions Education Act 1989 Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008 Care of Children Act 2004 Humans Rights Act 1993 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC), 1989 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act 1989 Privacy Act 1993 Health (Immunisation) Regulations 1995
  • 51. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 51 Further References and Resources http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/te-whariki.pdf http://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/content/code-of-ethics-certificated-teachers-0 http://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/sites/default/files/coe-poster-english.pdf http://www.education.govt.nz/early-childhood/running-an-ece-service/ the-regulatory-framework-for-ece/licensing-criteria/home-based-ece-services/ www.acc.co.nz – excellent for home environment safety – keeping safe. www.kidshealth.org www.safekids.org.nz www.plunket.org.nz www.fire.org.nz www.homesafety.co.nz
  • 52. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 52 Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A One Describe a safe environment for children in an ECE service. One – Environmental Safety Four environmental factors are identified (one for each table). For each environmental factor selected a safe environment is described (four safe environments described). Clear links are made between the safe environment description and the regulation criteria (Regulations, licensing criteria, appendices or schedules are stated). Two risk factors and two different methods for minimising the risks are described for each environmental factor. 18 Two – Emergencies Four emergencies are identified and stated. Emergency procedures for each of the four emergencies are described in detail. Any first aid practices that would be used until full medical treatment is available are included in the emergency procedure description. 24 Two Contribute to a safe environment for children in an ECE service Three – Checking Systems and Checklists Safe environment descriptions are provided for each of the areas listed on the daily hazard checks. One potential hazard and one action you would take to minimise the potential hazard are described for each area listed on the daily hazard checks. Verification is obtained to confirm checking system and checklist has been employed in your own ECE service, and that it maintains a safe environment. 27 Four – Where is the Best Spot? A sketch of either an indoor or outdoor ECE environment is provided, showing where you would position yourself to ensure a safe environment. Four safe practices from the range provided are selected. The description provided discusses how the four safe practices you have selected apply to the sketch you have created for your own ECE environment. Verification is obtained to confirm the four safe practices you described have been employed and modelled in your own ECE service. 30 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10019 version 4 | level 3 | credits 4 Describe and contribute to safe practices and a safe environment for a child in an ECE service
  • 53. 10019 POR421 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 53 Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A Three Describe and demonstrate techniques to assist a child to use safe practices in an ECE service. Five – Personal Hygiene Two personal hygiene practices are selected and stated at the top of each table. State your understanding of how you maintain these hygiene practices in your ECE service (three points required). Initial answers are reviewed and compared with the regulations and licencing criteria for your service. Two regulations are identified for each personal hygiene practice. From the regulations, identifies two points for each personal hygiene practice not identified in your initial answers. 34 Six – Environmental Hygiene Two environmental practices are selected and stated at the top of each table. State your understanding of how you maintain these hygiene practices in your ECE service (three points required). Two regulations are identified for each environmental hygiene practice. From the regulations, identifies two points for each environmental hygiene practice not identified in your initial answers. 36 Seven - Verification Verification is obtained to confirm the four safe practices you described have been employed and modelled in your own ECE service. 38 Eight – Redirecting Techniques Three unsafe situations have been identified and described. Redirecting techniques you would use to safely redirect the child/ren you are caring for are described (two points required for each of the three situations you described). Verification from your own ECE service is obtained to confirm you have demonstrated these redirecting techniques for the situations you have described. 39 Nine – Self-care Skills Safe practices tables are complete and contain the following information: - Three routines you can use that assist children to learn safe self-care skills are described. - Two practices you could role model to demonstrate safe self-care skills are described. - Two things the child can do to keep themselves safe are described. Verification from your own ECE service is obtained to confirm you have demonstrated the self-care skill techniques and the methods used to assist children in keeping themselves safe you have described in your own ECE service. 43 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10019 version 4 | level 3 | credits 4 Describe and contribute to safe practices and a safe environment for a child in an ECE service Assessor’s signature Date achieved