110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
First Name
Surname
School or Area Office
Home Address
Post Code
Em...
210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Tips to grow on
If you sleep on it, make it
If you drip on it, cle...
310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
10020
Table of contents
Unit Standard 10020 4
Assessment Criteri...
410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to:
Outcome ...
510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in ...
610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Statement of Authenticity
Types of plagiarism
Using a few senten...
710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Guidelines for referencing
Read the book or reading, then re-write...
810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
List of definitions
Early childhood setting
Home-based services in...
910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Personal hygiene is the basic concept of cleaning, grooming and ca...
1010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Toddlers are developing their independence so
caregivers can supp...
1110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Handwashing is the single most important means of preventing the ...
1210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal ...
1310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal ...
1410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal ...
1510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Environmental hygiene practices refer to those activities that ai...
1610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Maureen Perry (2002) asserts that young
children require predicta...
1710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Maintenance and cleanliness in an early childhood setting is esse...
1810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Two - Minimising Infection in the Environment...
1910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
How do these hygiene practices minimise infection?
Environmental ...
2010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Two - Minimising Infection in the Environment...
2110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environme...
2210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environme...
2310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environme...
2410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Four - Waste Product Disposal (Hygiene and Sa...
2510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Waste Product(s) Disposal Methods (two methods required) Hygiene ...
2610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Assessment Activity Four - Cleaning Products and Equipment
Thinki...
2710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Situation Two:
Clean up Routine
Equipment Used
Safety Practice
Hy...
2810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
My Reference List
2910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Further References and Resources
Kendrick, A.S., Kaufmann, R. & M...
3010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
One
Describe pe...
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POR422 10020 (Hygiene and Safety Practices)

POR422 10020 (Hygiene and Safety Practices
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
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Transcripts - POR422 10020 (Hygiene and Safety Practices)

  • 1. 110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd First Name Surname School or Area Office Home Address Post Code Email Learning Guide 2016 10020 Unit Standard Describe personal and environmental hygiene and safety practices in an ECE service. Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 2 This material is under license to PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd (PE&T) and may not be reproduced or copied without written permission SignedOffice use only Achieved Date The National Certificate in Early Childhood Education & Care (Level 3) POR422
  • 2. 210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Tips to grow on If you sleep on it, make it If you drip on it, clean it If you open it, close it If you drop it, pick it up If you wear it, hang it up If you empty it, fill it up If you turn it on, turn it off If you spill it, wipe it up If it rings, answer it If it howls, feed it If it climbs on you, hug it If it breathes, love it 2POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
  • 3. 310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10020 Table of contents Unit Standard 10020 4 Assessment Criteria 5 Plagiarism and Referencing 6 Definitions 8 Personal Hygiene 9 Infection Prevention 11 Environmental Hygiene Practices 15 Cleaning Routines 17 My Reference List 28 Further References 29 Marking Criteria 30
  • 4. 410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to: Outcome One Describe Personal Hygiene Practices Applied and Monitored by ECE Educators in an ECE Service Evidence Requirements 1.1 Personal hygiene practices applied and monitored by ECE educators are described in terms of minimising infection. Outcome Two Describe Environmental Hygiene and Safety Practices in an ECE Service in Accordance with Current ECE Practice Evidence Requirements 2.1 Environmental hygiene practices are described in terms of minimising infection. 2.2 Environmental safety practices are described in terms of minimising accidents. 2.3 Methods of disposing of waste products are described in terms of hygiene and safety practices. 2.4 Environmental hygiene and safety practices for using cleaning products and equipment are described. Learning Guide Resources Essential readings are in the front pocket of this Learning Guide. Read the Learning Guide in full before commencing this workbook. To successfully complete this Learning Guide you are required to complete all the assessment activities in this Learning Guide. NZQA unit requirements 10020 Unit Standard Describe personal and environmental hygiene and safety practices in an ECE service Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 2
  • 5. 510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in all practical and written assessment activities. Use the marking criteria on the last page of this workbook to ensure you have met all the assessment requirements. You are required to meet the following criteria for successful completion: Complete all assessment activities in this Learning Guide to achievement level. Complete child observations, fulfilling all set assessment criteria. Complete all practical assessments in an ECE setting (home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, play groups), and hospital-based services (paediatric playrooms). Practice and interaction with all children must be physically and emotionally safe. Provide evidence of your learning in relation to the Unit Standard in the Child Programme Journal (when appropriate). Complete Child Programme Journal entries (if applicable). Do not be limited by the space given for each response. If you choose to, you can use a computer to type your answers and paste them in the Learning Guide. Alternatively, you can use additional paper if required when writing a response and paste it in the Learning Guide. The programme is competency-based. This is defined by NZQA as “the ability to apply particular knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to the standards of performance required in specific contexts”. Your work will be graded Achieved (A) or Not Achieved (NA). If your work is deemed NA, you will be given guidance on extra work required and have further opportunities to resubmit. Assessment Criteria Icon Key Assessment Activity Icon Assessment Activities demonstrate your understanding of concepts and how to apply them when working with a child. Learning Activity Icon Learning Activities provide background learning in preparation for the assessments and support you to think about and practise new ideas. Readings Icon Readings icon indicates the textbook or article that will best help to support your learning. Website Icon Website icon indicates the additional on-line resources you can access to support your learning. Youtube Icon Youtube icon indicates there is a video you can watch to support your learning. Important Icon You need to pay particular attention to this information, and ensure you understand its meaning. All work must be completed in blue or black pen, NOT pencil or coloured gel pens.
  • 6. 610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Statement of Authenticity Types of plagiarism Using a few sentences or paragraphs without referencing the source. Copying whole parts of a book, other publications or the internet without referencing the source. Copying another learner’s work or allowing another learner to copy your work. Tutors giving the answers to assessment tasks to learners. As learners sometimes work in group environments, it is important to ensure that the assessment is your own individual work. You acknowledge this is your own individual work by completing, signing and dating the ‘Statement of Authenticity’ below. An activity may be discussed in a team environment and examples of answers can be mentioned, however, every learner needs to contribute and participate in the group activity, recording the answers in their own words. Learners who have written exactly the same answers in their Learning Guides have committed Plagiarism. This is not acceptable as it does not show your individual competence. Please refer to your student handbook or contact your Programme Tutor to obtain access to a copy of ‘A beginners guide to plagiarism’. Plagiarism and Referencing Learner’s name Learner’s signature Date confirm that this is an original assessment and is entirely my own work. It contains no material previously published or written by another person except where I have acknowledged this in the text. I Plagiarism, or copying of another’s work without referencing, is not acceptable.
  • 7. 710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Guidelines for referencing Read the book or reading, then re-write your understanding of it in your own words. If you want to quote a particular sentence or paragraph, you must acknowledge the author. For example: Penrose (1998) says “play is a major means by which children learn and develop” (p.7). OR “talking to and with children encourages their thinking” (Penrose, 1998, p.7). You will find the published date usually on the back of the first page of the book or on the list of readings given to you. At the end of your writing you should list all books, journals/articles or websites/web pages you have made reference to in completing this learning guide. For example: Type of Ref Example Book Penrose, P. (1998). Take another look (23rd ed.) Auckland: New Zealand Playcentre Federation. Journal / Article Stonehouse, A. (2011). The more you know, the more you see. The space for anything about early childhood, Issue no.27, Autumn 2012, 14-15. Website Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead. Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ Web page Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead (Home Based ECE Services). Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ServiceTypes/HomeBasedECEServices.aspx For further information on APA referencing, go to http://owll.massey.ac.nz/pdf/Academic-Writing-Guide.pdf
  • 8. 810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd List of definitions Early childhood setting Home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, playgroups), hospital-based service (paediatric playrooms). Educator May include persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Personal Hygiene Practices Include toileting, nose blowing, managing coughing and sneezing, dental care, skin care. Environmental Hygiene and Safety Practices May include preparation, handling, and consumption of food; toilet areas; sleeping areas; spills; resources. Young children Children between the years of birth to school entry. Three ‘broad age ranges’ are identified and the overlapping age categories are: Infant birth to eighteen months Toddler one year to three years Young child two and a half years to school entry age Definitions 8
  • 9. 910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Personal hygiene is the basic concept of cleaning, grooming and caring for our bodies and refers to practices that lead to cleanliness and health. As the responsible adult/caregiver, you have an obligation to support children to develop personal hygiene skills and implement personal hygiene practices for yourself and children in your care. This helps keep children free from illness and infections, preventing future health problems and promoting health. For example, washing hands prevents the spread of infections, brushing teeth prevents tooth decay and applying sunscreen keeps skin safe. A high level of personal health and hygiene care provides good protection for caregivers from infection, accidents and illness. Personal Hygiene Clothing Managing coughing and sneezing Covering of skin breaks Handwashing Hair care Bathing and showering Nose blowing Oral and dental hygiene Toileting Care of fingernails Use of personal body products (eg deodorant, moisturiser) Skin care Children have different needs as they develop and this requires different responses from the responsible adult/caregiver. Infants are dependent on caregivers for all their personal hygiene routines such as bathing, clean clothes and nappy changing. Hygiene routines are an important part of the planned learning experiences. Infants learn in a variety of ways, often relating certain activities to pleasant experiences. During bath-time where an infant happily kicks and splashes with the caregiver responding by talking, singing and smiling, positive feelings towards the hygiene routine are established. Stories, songs and chants can be used to promote personal hygiene (e.g. you are my sunshine, my only sunshine). Sharing familiar domestic experiences with the child using books and music gives lots of opportunities for the child and caregiver to enjoy hygiene routines in an interesting and direct way.
  • 10. 1010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Toddlers are developing their independence so caregivers can support this while promoting positive hygiene practices. A sensitive caregiver will offer assistance when required while tenderly explaining why ‘bottoms need wiping’ and ‘hands need washing’. Toddlers can extend their experiences by relating personal hygiene to activities such as washing of toys, doll’s clothes and play tea sets. As a young child’s manipulative skills increase routines such as nose wiping will be carried out by him/her. Gentle reminders are required as there will be times such as when the child rushes in for lunch after an exciting outdoor activity and forgets to wash hands. (Mathews, 2001)
  • 11. 1110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Handwashing is the single most important means of preventing the spread of infection. Therefore, hands must always be washed at such times as... Before preparing food, eating, or feeding a child; and After toileting self or child, handling body secretions, and pets/animals. Infection Prevention Reading One Ministry of Health (1998). Nga Kupu Oranga Healthy Messages: A health and safety resource for early childhood services (pp. 10-27). Auckland, New Zealand. Available to download from the Ministry of Health Website. https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/ngakupuorangahealthymessages.pdf Watch this movie clip to see how germs spread. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical center (2014). How Germs Spread/Explaining the Science for Kids. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBGsoimPXZg
  • 12. 1210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal Hygiene Practices Personal hygiene practices What is the step-by-step procedure you use to apply this personal hygiene practice? What routines do you have in place to monitor this personal hygiene practice? How do these practices minimise (prevent) infection? Example Care of finger nails Example Step one: Sit the child down to cut fingernails. Step two: Use clippers or nail scissors to cut the nails. Step three: Check that there are no rough sides that could scratch, if so smooth over with a file. Example When the child is in the bath at night I always get him to clean his fingernails. This is when I check his fingernails to see if they need cutting. Example Keeping the child’s fingernails short and clean reduces the chances of the child scratching them self. If nails are long bacteria could build up and cause infection. 1 1. State the type of ECE service (centre-based, home-based, or hospital-based) and the type of educator represented (teacher, supervisor, co-ordinator, whānau/families, nanny). 2. The tables provided list five personal hygiene practices you will be expected to apply and monitor in the stated ECE service. For each of the five personal hygiene practices: Describe how each personal hygiene practice would be applied in the stated ECE service. Describe how each personal hygiene practice would be monitored to prevent infection occurring (an example has been provided for you). Type of ECE Service Home-based Type of Educator Nanny Careful hygiene practices are important in limiting the spread of infection. Prevention is achieved through education, good communication and co-operation. Lack of information often leads to improper care, such as spreading infection by not washing hands when necessary. Caregivers need to model and educate young children about good hygiene practices to create a healthy environment. (Kendrick et al., 1995)
  • 13. 1310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal Hygiene Practices Personal hygiene practices What is the step-by-step procedure you use to apply this personal hygiene practice? What routines do you have in place to monitor this personal hygiene practice? How do these practices minimise (prevent) infection? Toileting Nose blowing 1 Type of ECE Service Type of Educator
  • 14. 1410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity One - Application and Monitoring of Personal Hygiene Practices Personal hygiene practices What is the step-by-step procedure you use to apply this personal hygiene practice? What routines do you have in place to monitor this personal hygiene practice? How do these practices minimise (prevent) infection? Managing coughing and sneezing Dental care Skin care 1
  • 15. 1510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Environmental hygiene practices refer to those activities that aim at improving or maintaining a standard of basic environmental conditions affecting the well-being of people (eg preparation, handling, and consumption of food, toilet areas, sleeping areas, spills, resources). These practices minimise infection and accidents. Hygiene practices - both yours as the adult and those of young children - need to be of the highest standard to prevent the spread of infection. Careful hygiene practices and high standards will create a sanitary, healthy environment. Environmental Hygiene Practices Reading One Ministry of Health (1998). Nga Kupu Oranga Healthy Messages: A health and safety resource for early childhood services (pp. 10-27). Auckland, New Zealand. Available to download from the Ministry of Health Website. https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/ ngakupuorangahealthymessages.pdf Reading Two Mathews, C. (2001). Healthy children (pp. 163-172). Eastgardens, NSW: MacLennan & Petty Pty Limited. Reading Three Greenman, J. & Stonehouse, A. (1997). Primetimes: A handbook for excellence in infant and toddler programs (pp. 160-165). Melbourne: Longman. Reading Four Bruce, T. & Meggitt, C. (2002). Child care & education (3rd ed). (pp. 184-191). London: Hodder & Stoughton. Watch the youtube movie clip to learn more about accidents that could occur in ECE settings. Vea Australia - New Zealand (2014). Focusing on Early Years. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=6LcJSafNzw8 To assist you in gaining knowledge, particularly on the control of infection, use all available resources from your local library and/or Public Health Unit Contacts (http://www.health.govt.nz/new-zealand-health-system/key-health-sector-organisations-and-people/public-health-units/public-health-unit-contacts). To get you thinking about hygiene guidelines, routines and practices work through the following readings.
  • 16. 1610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Maureen Perry (2002) asserts that young children require predictability in routines and handling. Caregivers should let children know what is going to happen beforehand so they can be prepared. As educators, we need to give infants time to physically register what is being said before we actually do what we say we are going to do. The hygiene routine, e.g. nappy changing is then a gentle respectful activity with much talk, eye contact, enjoyment and one-on-one attention.
  • 17. 1710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Maintenance and cleanliness in an early childhood setting is essential to minimise infection. The caregiver is responsible for supervising and monitoring the cleaning and other maintenance activities. A caregiver should consider which cleaning products and equipment are most appropriate. Within an early childhood setting cleaning routines need to fulfil health and safety requirements (eg eliminate, isolate or minimise opportunities for infection and accidents to occur). It is essential that there are planned procedures for cleaning routines. Cleaning Routines Cleaning and disinfecting are different and should not be confused. Clean means to remove visible dirt by using a product suitable for the surface. Disinfect means to kill germs by using a disinfectant cleaner or chlorine bleach solution. (Kendrick et al., 1995). Planned Procedure for Cleaning Up vomit Isolate area Go to cleaning cupboard Find blue bucket (assigned for vomit only) Put in disinfectant sourced from the second shelf, add water Put on gloves Get plastic bag Get paper towels Clean up excess vomit with paper towels and place in plastic bag Clean floor area with disinfectant and water with new green cloth (wrapped in newspaper disposed in green bin after use) Wash out bucket after use.
  • 18. 1810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Two - Minimising Infection in the Environment 1. Select three environmental areas from the illustrations (range) below. 2. Create a poster or use the templates provided - one for each environmental area. Be as creative as you like with pictures and colour. Your poster or templates need to include: The type of ECE service (centre-based, home-based, or hospital-based) and the type of educator represented (teacher, supervisor, co-ordinator, whānau/families, nanny). A description of three hygiene practices you would follow for each of the environmental areas you have selected. A description of how these hygienic practices would minimise infection for the environments you have selected (the first one has been completed as an example for you). 2 Preparing Food ResourcesHandling FoodSleeping Areas Toilet AreasConsumption of Food Early Childhood Educators are able to protect children’s health by preventing the spread of illness and infection through the ECE service policies, safe practices or routines they have in place, and by helping children to develop their own self-care skills. Minimising infection strategies are commonly found within the ECE service’s exclusion and immunisation policies, and by having procedures in place for cleaning and personal hygiene practices. (Ministry of Health, 1997)
  • 19. 1910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd How do these hygiene practices minimise infection? Environmental Area: Hygiene Practice (three practices required): Type of ECE Service Type of Educator Type of ECE Service Home-based Type of Educator Nanny Example Assessment Activity Two - Minimising Infection in the Environment 2 Environmental Area: How do these hygiene practices minimise infection? Hygiene Practice (three practices required): Toileting Areas Check the toileting area regularly after children have used it. Clean up any accidents using disinfectant. Ensure that children have washed their hands. Cleaning up quickly after accidents will stop the next child being exposed to urine and faeces (minimises contamination). Checking regularly pre-empts and minimises other children from coming into contact with contaminated areas - especially if accidents occur that you don’t yet know about. Children washing their hands ensure no germs/bacteria are transferred onto the food – avoiding illness.
  • 20. 2010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Two - Minimising Infection in the Environment 2 How do these hygiene practices minimise infection? Environmental Area: Hygiene Practice (three practices required): How do these hygiene practices minimise infection? Environmental Area: Hygiene Practice (three practices required):
  • 21. 2110020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environment 1. Select three environmental areas from the illustrations (range) below: Describe the safety practices you would follow for each of the environmental areas you have selected. Describe how these safety practices would minimise accidents for the environments you have selected (the first one has been completed as an example for you). 3 Preparing Food Handling Food Consumption of Food Toilet Areas Resources Sleeping Areas Children’s growth and development occurs when they are free to explore environments that are safe and free from hazards. Early Childhood educators are able to protect children through the use of policies, safe practices or routines, and by helping children to develop their own self-care skills. Minimising accident strategies are commonly found within the ECE service policies and by having procedures in place for that will help prevent injuries and accidents. (Ministry of Health, 1997)
  • 22. 2210020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environment 3 Example Type of ECE Service Home-based Type of Educator Nanny Environmental Area: Safety Practice (three practices required): Sleeping Areas Ensure there is a clear area from the bed to the doorway. Make sure there are no curtain cords hanging down and ensure there is nothing around the child’s neck. If the child is in a cot, make sure they are sleeping on their back with no bumper pads. How do these safety minimise accidents? If the child gets out of bed, clear areas between the bed and doorway minimises the child’s chances of getting hurt from tripping. Checking curtain cords eliminates the chances of the child getting the cords wrapped around their neck, which could cause death. If the baby sleeps on its back it reduces the chances of cot death. Environmental Area: Safety Practice (three practices required): How do these safety minimise accidents? Type of ECE Service Type of Educator Example
  • 23. 2310020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Three - Preventing Accidents in the Environment 3 Environmental Area: Safety Practice (three practices required): How do these safety minimise accidents? Environmental Area: Safety Practice (three practices required): How do these safety minimise accidents?
  • 24. 2410020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Four - Waste Product Disposal (Hygiene and Safety Practices) Waste products such as soiled nappies, dirty tissues, leftover food scraps and rubbish, and animal faeces, if left undisposed of are likely to contaminate surrounding areas and result in children becoming very sick or catching infections. As an educator you are able to minimise the risks associated to undisposed waste products by having policies in place such as nappy changing policies and food safety policies that protect the health and wellbeing of the children you are caring for. 1. Select two types of waste products you would find in an ECE service from the range of waste products below. Record the two types of waste products in the first column of the table. Nappies Food scraps Tissues Animal Faeces Rubbish 2. For each type of waste product you have chosen: Describe how you would dispose of the waste products (two methods required). Describe at least one hygiene practice and one safety practice that relates to the methods of disposal you have described. An example has been completed for you. 4 Waste Product(s) Disposal Methods (two methods required) Hygiene Practices Safety Practices Example Animal Faeces Example Pick up the animal faeces with a pooper scooper/shovel. Place in a plastic bag. Tie the plastic bag up and put in the outdoor rubbish bin. Example Wash my hands after I have picked up the animal faeces. or Use a designated pooper scooper that isn’t used for anything else. or Clean pooper scooper after use and keep in a secure area to prevent children from coming into contact with it. Example Faeces are removed so no one slips in it, and injures themself. or Make sure plastic bags are kept out of reach so children can’t suffocate.
  • 25. 2510020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Waste Product(s) Disposal Methods (two methods required) Hygiene Practices Safety Practices Assessment Activity Four - Waste Product Disposal (Hygiene and Safety Practices) 4
  • 26. 2610020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Four - Cleaning Products and Equipment Thinking about the type of ECE service you stated in Assessment Activity Two: 1. Identify and describe two situations when you would have to clean up after an incident. 2. Describe the cleaning routine you followed. 3. Describe what equipment you used and the health and safety procedures and practices you followed while cleaning up. 5 Development of cleaning routines is a really effective way of minimising infection within ECE services. The procedures should state how and when the items and areas will be cleaned. They should name the cleaning products and equipment that will be used and where these items should be stored. It is also a good idea to decide what cleaning equipment shouldn’t be used (e.g. equipment used to clean in the toileting areas should not be used to clean in the kitchen). (Ministry of Health, 1997) Example Situation Little Pete has rushed to the toilet, but has left it a bit late and has not made it to the toilet in time. Consequently there is urine on the floor. Clean up Routine Remove Pete from the toilet area. If you are on your own, shut the affected areas and clean up Pete. Gather up cleaning products and equipment and clean up the affected area. If you were with someone else get the other person to take care of Pete, and then mop and disinfect the area. Equipment Used Bucket of water and mop, disinfectant, gloves and a cloth. Safety Practice I would ensure I would dry the floor thoroughly to prevent anyone from slipping. Hygiene Practice I would ensure that I wore gloves to prevent my hands being contaminated.
  • 27. 2710020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Situation Two: Clean up Routine Equipment Used Safety Practice Hygiene Practice Situation One: Clean up Routine Equipment Used Safety Practice Hygiene Practice Assessment Activity Four - Cleaning Products and Equipment 5
  • 28. 2810020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd My Reference List
  • 29. 2910020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Further References and Resources Kendrick, A.S., Kaufmann, R. & Messenger, K.P. (1995). Healthy young children: A manual for programs. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children. Ministry of Education (1996). Te Whariki: He Whāriki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna a Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Ministry of Health. (1997). Nga Kupu Oranga Healthy Messages: A health and safety resource for early childhood services. Retrieved July 5, 2012 from http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/ nga-kupu-oranga-healthy-messages-health-and-safety-resource-early-childhood-services New Zealand Teachers Council (2004). Code of Ethics for Registered Teachers Code of Ethics. Perry, M. (2002). Toward a culture of respect for infants and toddlers. The First Years: Nga Tau Tuatahi. New Zealand Journal of Infant and Toddler Education 4(1), 25-28. Legislation and Conventions Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008 Care of Children Act 2004 Humans Rights Act 1993 Privacy Act 1993 Health (Immunisation) Regulations 1995 Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 http://www.education.govt.nz/early-childhood/teaching-and-learning/ece-curriculum/te-whariki/ http://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/content/code-of-ethics-certificated-teachers-0 www.healthed.govt.nz www.treasures.co.nz
  • 30. 3010020 POR422 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A One Describe personal hygiene practices applied and monitored by ECE educators in an ECE service. One – Application and monitoring of personal hygiene practices Describes how each of the five personal hygiene practices are applied in the stated ECE service. Describes how each of the five personal hygiene practices are monitored in the stated ECE service to minimise infection. 12 Two Describe environmental hygiene and safety practices in an ECE service in accordance with current ECE practice. Two – Environmental hygiene practices (minimising infection) Selects three environmental hygiene practices. Describes three hygiene practices for each of the environmental areas selected. Describes how the three hygiene practices described minimise infection for the each of the three environmental areas selected. 18 Three – Environmental safety practices (minimising accidents) Selects three environmental safety practices. Describes three safety practices for each of the environmental areas selected. Describes how the three safety practices described minimise accidents for the each of the three environmental areas selected. 21 Four – Waste product disposal (hygiene and safety practices) Selects two types of waste products familiar to them in an ECE service. Describes at least two methods of disposing waste products for each. Describes at least one hygiene practice and one safety practice that apply to the two waste products selected. 24 Five – Cleaning products and equipment For the two cleaning situations identified: Describes the procedures and the cleaning products used to clean up. Describes one hygiene practice and one safety practice followed when using the equipment and cleaning products. 26 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10020 version 4 | level 2 | credits 2 Describe personal and environmental hygiene and safety practices in an ECE service Assessor’s signature Date achieved