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Learning Guide 2016
10021
Unit Standard
Describe the basic needs o...
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Toddlers Cre...
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10021
Table of contents
Unit Standard 10021 4
Assessment Criteria...
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On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to:
Outcome ...
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To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in ...
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Statement of Authenticity
Types of plagiarism
Using a few senten...
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Guidelines for referencing
Read the book or reading, then re-write...
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List of definitions
Early childhood setting
Home-based services in...
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Some needs are more basic or powerful than others. Think for a mom...
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1. What three things would you choose?
Learning Activity One - S...
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Identifying Needs
The caring adult is responsible for meeting the...
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Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
Abraham Maslow (1954) was a researche...
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Reading Two
Gordon, A.M. & Williams-Browne, K. (2000). Beginnings...
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Learning Activity Two - Ladder of Needs
Using the information fro...
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The Essentials - Meeting the Child’s Basic Needs
Needs are essent...
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Assessment Activity One - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for ...
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Assessment Activity One - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for ...
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Clothing Shelter Sleeping
Age Category - Toddler (1 - 3 years)
2
...
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Assessment Activity Two - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for ...
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Clothing Shelter Sleeping
Age Category - Young Child (2½ years - ...
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Assessment Activity Three - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs fo...
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How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Health and Wellbeing?
The...
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Example The child attends playgroup twice a week where she social...
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Example Playing alongside others helps them develop social skills...
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Example Having friends gives young children opportunities to shar...
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How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Learning and Development?...
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Assessment Activity Seven - Child’s Learning and Development
Desc...
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Assessment Activity Seven - Child’s Learning and Development
7
Ov...
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Intellectual and Moral
Needs
Suitable for each child
learning opp...
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Patterns of learning and development are sometimes
seen as a prog...
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Assessment Activity Eight - Whānau/Family
Whānau/family and peopl...
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Environmental Influences on the provision of Basic Needs
(One poi...
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Environmental Influences on the provision of Basic Needs
(One poi...
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My Reference List
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Further References and Resources
Bruce, T. & Meggitt, C. (2002). ...
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Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
One
Describe th...
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POR423 10021 (Basic Needs)

POR423 10021 (Basic Needs)
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
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Transcripts - POR423 10021 (Basic Needs)

  • 1. 110021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Learning Guide 2016 10021 Unit Standard Describe the basic needs of children in an ECE service. Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 3 This material is under license to PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd (PE&T) and may not be reproduced or copied without written permission POR423 SignedOffice use only Achieved Date The National Certificate in Early Childhood Education & Care (Level 3) First Name Surname School or Area Office Home Address Post Code Email
  • 2. 210021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd10021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Toddlers Creed If I want it... IT’S MINE If I give it to you and change my mind later... IT’S MINE If I take it away from you... IT’S MINE If I had it a little while ago... IT’S MINE If it’s mine, it will never belong to anyone else... NO MATTER WHAT If we are building something together... all the pieces are MINE If it looks just like mine... THEN IT IS MINE 2
  • 3. 310021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10021 Table of contents Unit Standard 10021 4 Assessment Criteria 5 Plagiarism and Referencing 6 Definitions 8 What do I Need? 9 Identifying Needs 11 Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs 12 The Essentials - Meeting the Child’s Basic Needs 15 How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Health and Wellbeing? 22 How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Learning and Development? 26 Environmental Influences and Children’s Needs 29 Reference List 34 Further References 35 Marking Criteria 36
  • 4. 410021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to: Outcome One Describe the basic needs of children in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 1.1 Basic needs of children in an ECE service are described in terms of their impact on the health and wellbeing of children. 1.2 Basic needs of children in an ECE service are described in terms of how they may impact on learning and development of children. 1.3 Basic needs of children in an ECE service are described in terms of how they will be provided to the children. Outcome Two Describe the environmental influences on the provision of basic needs of children in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 2.1 Environmental influences are described in terms of their impact on the provision of basic needs for children in an ECE service. Learning Guide Resources Essential readings are in the front pocket of this Learning Guide. Read the Learning Guide in full before commencing this workbook. To successfully complete this Learning Guide you are required to complete all the assessment activities in this Learning Guide. NZQA unit requirements 10021 Unit Standard Describe the basic needs of children in an ECE service Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 3
  • 5. 510021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in all practical and written assessment activities. Use the marking criteria on the last page of this workbook to ensure you have met all the assessment requirements. You are required to meet the following criteria for successful completion: Complete all assessment activities in this Learning Guide to achievement level. Complete all practical assessments in an ECE setting (home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, play groups), and hospital-based services (paediatric playrooms). Practice and interaction with all children must be physically and emotionally safe. Provide evidence of your learning in relation to the Unit Standard in the Child Programme Journal (when appropriate). Complete Child Programme Journal entries (if applicable). Do not be limited by the space given for each response. If you choose to, you can use a computer to type your answers and paste them in the Learning Guide. Alternatively, you can use additional paper if required when writing a response and paste it in the Learning Guide. The programme is competency-based. This is defined by NZQA as “the ability to apply particular knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to the standards of performance required in specific contexts”. Your work will be graded Achieved (A) or Not Achieved (NA). If your work is deemed NA, you will be given guidance on extra work required and have further opportunities to resubmit. Assessment Criteria Icon Key Assessment Activity Icon Assessment Activities demonstrate your understanding of concepts and how to apply them when working with a child. Learning Activity Icon Learning Activities provide background learning in preparation for the assessments and support you to think about and practise new ideas. Readings Icon Readings icon indicates the textbook or article that will best help to support your learning. Website Icon Website icon indicates the additional on-line resources you can access to support your learning. Youtube Icon Youtube icon indicates there is a video you can watch to support your learning. Important Icon You need to pay particular attention to this information, and ensure you understand its meaning. All work must be completed in blue or black pen, NOT pencil or coloured gel pens.
  • 6. 610021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Statement of Authenticity Types of plagiarism Using a few sentences or paragraphs without referencing the source. Copying whole parts of a book, other publications or the internet without referencing the source. Copying another learner’s work or allowing another learner to copy your work. Tutors giving the answers to assessment tasks to learners. As learners sometimes work in group environments, it is important to ensure that the assessment is your own individual work. You acknowledge this is your own individual work by completing, signing and dating the ‘Statement of Authenticity’ below. An activity may be discussed in a team environment and examples of answers can be mentioned, however, every learner needs to contribute and participate in the group activity, recording the answers in their own words. Learners who have written exactly the same answers in their Learning Guides have committed Plagiarism. This is not acceptable as it does not show your individual competence. Please refer to your student handbook or contact your Programme Tutor to obtain access to a copy of ‘A beginners guide to plagiarism’. Plagiarism and Referencing Learner’s name Learner’s signature Date confirm that this is an original assessment and is entirely my own work. It contains no material previously published or written by another person except where I have acknowledged this in the text. I Plagiarism, or copying of another’s work without referencing, is not acceptable.
  • 7. 710021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Guidelines for referencing Read the book or reading, then re-write your understanding of it in your own words. If you want to quote a particular sentence or paragraph, you must acknowledge the author. For example: Penrose (1998) says “play is a major means by which children learn and develop” (p.7). OR “talking to and with children encourages their thinking” (Penrose, 1998, p.7). You will find the published date usually on the back of the first page of the book or on the list of readings given to you. At the end of your writing you should list all books, journals/articles or websites/web pages you have made reference to in completing this learning guide. For example: Type of Ref Example Book Penrose, P. (1998). Take another look (23rd ed.) Auckland: New Zealand Playcentre Federation. Journal / Article Stonehouse, A. (2011). The more you know, the more you see. The space for anything about early childhood, Issue no.27, Autumn 2012, 14-15. Website Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead. Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ Web page Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead (Home Based ECE Services). Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ServiceTypes/HomeBasedECEServices.aspx For further information on APA referencing, go to http://owll.massey.ac.nz/pdf/Academic-Writing-Guide.pdf
  • 8. 810021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd List of definitions Early childhood setting Home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, playgroups), hospital-based service (paediatric playrooms). Educator May include persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Young children Children between the years of birth to school entry. Three ‘broad age ranges’ are identified and the overlapping age categories are: Infant birth to eighteen months Toddler one year to three years Young child two and a half years to school entry age Whānau/Families Parents, guardians, or members of the extended family who have an interest in the child. Basic Needs These include clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding. Environmental Influences These include health of a child, safety, education of children and parents, culture and whānau/family. Definitions 8
  • 9. 910021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Some needs are more basic or powerful than others. Think for a moment about the needs that influence your own behaviour. Which seem the strongest? Which do you spend the most time and energy satisfying? Let’s examine this a bit further… What do I Need? Your Favourite Book Sun Hat Matches Safety Pin Rope Block Of Chocolate Safety Flare Swimming Togs Knife Bag Of Rice Blanket Ipod Learning Activity One - Survivor Challenge You are stranded on a desert island alone after your boat has sunk. The island has a supply of fruit and fresh water. Before the boat sank you had the opportunity to take three things from the items listed below with you in a waterproof bag. 1
  • 10. 1010021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1. What three things would you choose? Learning Activity One - Survivor Challenge 1 2. How will these objects satisfy your needs? 4. Why might your needs be different to other people? 3. Ask two other people what their three choices would be and compare the lists. How was your list different from the others? Person 1 Person 2
  • 11. 1110021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Identifying Needs The caring adult is responsible for meeting the basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) of children. The way these needs are met will vary considerably according to family circumstances, culture and the personalities of the child and the adult. Children’s needs can be listed in two categories: Reading One Gunstone, H., Matthews, N., Roy, E. & Watson, A. (1996). Journey through families & adolescence (pp. 27-32). Melbourne: Longman. Primary Which covers the physiological or physical conditions needed to grow and develop. Secondary Which are needs related to emotional health.
  • 12. 1210021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Abraham Maslow (1954) was a researcher and theorist who developed a visual model of the needs human beings require if they are to become the best they can be (to reach their full potential). This model is known as MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS. It can be presented as a ladder (or sometimes a pyramid) showing how important it is for children to have their physical needs met as a strong foundation for further growth and development. The ladder shows the most basic need on the bottom rung, progressing up to more complex needs, implying that to climb the ladder and reach the top, each rung must be strong and children must have each need met before moving on to the next rung. Dutch Renaissance Press (2013). Printable Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Chart. Maslow’s Pyramid Diagram. Retrieved from http://www.timvandevall.com/printable-maslows-hierarchy-of-needs-chart/
  • 13. 1310021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Reading Two Gordon, A.M. & Williams-Browne, K. (2000). Beginnings & Beyond (5th ed.) (pp.148-149). Albany, NY: Delmar. Reading Three Early Childhood Development. (2001). Children’s needs. Learning and development 0-3 years, 7. Watch this short animated movie clip to learn more about Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. PowToon. (2014). Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=TMJb5LhbifY Watch this longer youtube movie clip to more details about Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. About.com. (2012). Overview of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=EH04OsNuvcw An example would be that if a child’s basic need to keep warm and be well fed is not met, he/she cannot feel safe and secure; or a hungry, insecure or hurt children will find it more challenging to learn. Children need to be safe, to be in loving relationships with people who care for them, to know they are special in the eyes of the people in their lives, and to have opportunities to succeed to the best of their abilities if they are to reach the top of the ladder.
  • 14. 1410021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Learning Activity Two - Ladder of Needs Using the information from READING ONE, fill in the boxes below. In column one, describe at least two needs at each level. In column two, describe what happens if the needs at each level of the ladder are not met. 2 The Needs What might happen if each need is not met? (two answers in each box) What might be included in each need? (two answers in each box) Esteem Love/Belonging Safety Physiological Self-actualisation
  • 15. 1510021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd The Essentials - Meeting the Child’s Basic Needs Needs are essential for survival and if not met can breed physical and emotional ill health. From the moment children are born they are completely dependent on an adult to meet all their basic needs. Bruce and Meggitt (2002) claim that to achieve and maintain healthy growth and development (that is physical, intellectual, emotional and social development), certain needs must be fulfilled. The six photos below represent the range of basic needs children need to enable them to learn and grow. Meeting these needs depends on the age of the child and the developmental stage they are in. Sleeping eg watch for signs of tiredness Clothing eg clothing is made out of natural material that allows skin to breathe such as cotton Bathing and Cleanlinesseg bath my baby daily toclean all areas of their body Feeding eg introduce solids slowly, one food at a time Nurturing eg engage with my child by playing and talking with him Basic Needs of Children in ECE Services All of these contribute to the holistic development of a healthy child Shelter eg keep the home dry and ventilated by opening windows to allow fresh air to flow
  • 16. 1610021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity One - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for an Infant? 1. Select (tick) the type of ECE service you are working in: Centre-based Home-based Hospital-based 2. In the boxes below, describe how you would meet the basic needs of an infant (provide two examples for each basic need). 1 Clothing Shelter Sleeping Age Category - Infant (birth - 18 months)
  • 17. 1710021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity One - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for an Infant? 1 Nurturing Bathing and Cleanliness Feeding Age Category - Infant (birth - 18 months)
  • 18. 1810021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Clothing Shelter Sleeping Age Category - Toddler (1 - 3 years) 2 Assessment Activity Two - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for a Toddler? 1. Select (tick) the type of ECE service you are working in: Centre-based Home-based Hospital-based 2. In the boxes below, describe how you would meet the basic needs of an toddler (provide two examples for each basic need). Note: please ensure your answers for this assessment activity are different to the previous assessment activity.
  • 19. 1910021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Two - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for a Toddler? 2 Nurturing Bathing and Cleanliness Feeding Age Category - Toddler (1 - 3 years)
  • 20. 2010021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Clothing Shelter Sleeping Age Category - Young Child (2½ years - school entry age) 3 Assessment Activity Three - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for a Young Child? 1. Select (tick) the type of ECE service you are working in: Centre-based Home-based Hospital-based 2. In the boxes below, describe how you would meet the basic needs of a young child (provide two examples for each basic need). Note: please ensure your answers for this assessment activity are different to the previous assessment activity.
  • 21. 2110021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Three - How Would you Meet the Basic Needs for a Young Child? 3 Nurturing Bathing and Cleanliness Feeding Age Category - Young Child (2½ years - school entry age)
  • 22. 2210021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Health and Wellbeing? There is a growing body of knowledge that shows a strong link between what happens in children’s younger years and the effect this has on their future health and wellbeing. Wellbeing is linked to a child’s health, their behaviours and their resilience, this can be influenced by their environment and their relationships within that environment. Health can also be influenced by the environment and a range of social factors within that environment, such as the availability and affordability of food. Now that you have identified how you would meet the basic needs of children its time to discuss how these basic needs have an influence on children’s health and well being. happy healthy parents make happy healthy children Dr Miriam Stoppard
  • 23. 2310021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Example The child attends playgroup twice a week where she socialises with other children. This can have a negative affect on her health due to being exposed to other children, who may be sick. Assessment Activity Four - Health and Wellbeing of an Infant Describe how you meet the basic need and then explain how the infant’s health and wellbeing are affected. Both positive and negative effects may be used in your examples. 4 Social Nurturing Sleeping Bathing and Cleanliness Shelter Clothing Feeding Basic Needs and the Infant’s Health & Wellbeing
  • 24. 2410021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Example Playing alongside others helps them develop social skills such as sharing and taking turns. It helps their emotional wellbeing by helping them to learn to cooperate and understand the needs of others. Assessment Activity Five - Health and Wellbeing of an Toddler Describe how you meet the basic need and then explain how the toddler’s health and wellbeing are affected. Both positive and negative effects may be used in your examples. 5 Social Nurturing Sleeping Bathing and Cleanliness Shelter Clothing Feeding Basic Needs and the Toddler’s Health & Wellbeing
  • 25. 2510021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Example Having friends gives young children opportunities to share ideas and develop their social skills. This builds their emotional wellbeing by supporting the development of their self-esteem so they know they are important to other people. Assessment Activity Six - Health and Wellbeing of an Young Child Describe how you meet the basic need and then explain how the young child’s health and wellbeing are affected. Both positive and negative effects may be used in your examples. 6 Social Nurturing Sleeping Bathing and Cleanliness Shelter Clothing Feeding Basic Needs and the Young Child’s Health & Wellbeing
  • 26. 2610021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd How do Basic Needs Impact on Children’s Learning and Development? Learning and development can be defined as gaining and refining new skills and knowledge within the child’s physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual worlds. Learning and development is interwoven, therefore one cannot occur without the other. Within the child’s environment the experiences and relationships that they have influence their learning and development and have either a positive or negative effect. Now that you have looked at how basic needs influence children health and wellbeing, it’s time to look at how those basic needs influence their learning and development. Tell me and I forget Teach me and I remember Involve me and I learn. Benjamin Franklin
  • 27. 2710021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Seven - Child’s Learning and Development Describe how you meet the basic need and then explain how the child’s health and development are affected. Both positive and negative effects may be used in your examples. 7 Overlapping Age Categories Basic Needs Infant Toddler Young Child Example Social Example: Interactions with familiar people encourages the infant’s social skills and the development of attachment. The infant learns people can be relied on to meet their needs. Example: Toddlers need opportunities to interact with other children to develop their social skills. The toddler learns to share and develop friendships by socialising with other children. Example: A young child needs experiences that encourage cooperative play so they can learn the skills needed to build relationships with others. Skills such as cooperation, communication, sharing or turn taking helps them to develop into a valued member of society. Clothing Shelter Bathing And Cleanliness
  • 28. 2810021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Seven - Child’s Learning and Development 7 Overlapping Age Categories Basic Needs Infant Toddler Young Child Sleeping Nurturing Feeding
  • 29. 2910021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Intellectual and Moral Needs Suitable for each child learning opportunities values good role models culture beliefs social class acceptance time for the child education Adults create the environment that influences a young child’s growth and development by providing for... Environmental Influences and Children’s Needs The way families meet their young children’s basic needs may vary. For example, families have different opinions about sleeping, eating, keeping children safe, how they express love, affection and what they think is important for children’s development and learning. All of these things together create the environment in which children grow, develop and learn. Physical and Safety Needs Suitable for each child healthy food bathing shelter clothing sleeping good routines immunisation health checks safe from harm safe places feeding space things to do, things to see Social and Emotional Needs Suitable for each child love care shelter sense of belonging trust good self image boundaries acceptance self worth
  • 30. 3010021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Patterns of learning and development are sometimes seen as a progressive continuum linked to age, but such patterns vary for individual children in ways that are not always predictable. The direction and speed of learning and growing will often fluctuate from day to day, according to where the child is and the people they are with. (MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, 1996, p. 21) You might want to investigate the following websites to learn more about environmental influences and how they can impact on meeting the basic needs of children. Every Child thrives, belongs, achieves. http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/work-programmes/ policy-development/green-paper-vulnerable-children/green-paper-for-vulnerable-children.pdf Growing Up in New Zealand. http://www.growingup.co.nz/en/about-the-study/study-design-and-research-focus.html Growing up in New Zealand. http://www.growingup.co.nz/en/research-findings-impact/current-research.html The White Paper for Vulnerable Children Volume II. http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/work- programmes/policy-development/white-paper-vulnerable-children/whitepaper-volume-ii-web.pdf Factors such as health, safety, education of children and parents, and cultural diversity are influenced by the family/whānau values and beliefs. These also influence the pattern of learning and development of each child.
  • 31. 3110021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Assessment Activity Eight - Whānau/Family Whānau/family and people who care for children need to be aware of how environmental influences (health of a child, safety, education of children and parents, culture, whānau/family) impact on meeting the basic needs of children. 1. Create one resource sheet (template provided) you can give to the whānau/family or carer that describe how environmental influences can have an impact on meeting the basic needs of children. 2. Select one age category and two basic needs from the lists below. 8 3. Your resources sheet needs to answer the following question (one example for each environmental influence is required). How do each of the environmental influences (health of a child, safety, education of children and parents, culture and whānau/family) impact the provision of the two basic needs you have chosen for your specific age group? All must be covered in your resource sheets. Health of a Child Safety Education of children and parents Culture Whanau and family Select (tick) one of the age categories from the list below: Infant Toddler Young Child Select (tick) one basic need from the list below: Clothing Shelter Bathing and Cleanliness Sleeping Nurturing Feeding Environmental influences
  • 32. 3210021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Environmental Influences on the provision of Basic Needs (One point required for each Environmental Influence) Whānau/Family The family may live in a large extended family group which means that the child is exposed to more rituals and traditions of their culture. This supports their sense of belonging. Culture Each of my children has their own room which gives them privacy as this is valued in our culture. Safety I ensure that I have a well fenced outdoor play area to allow my child to explore the freely without risks to their safety. Education Of Parents And Children Parents have knowledge of how to child-proof their house for young children. This would include putting medicine and poisons in locked cupboards. Health Of A Child The home of the child needs to be warm, dry and well ventilated in order for the child to remain healthy. If the child’s home was cold this could lead to the child getting sick. Basic Need: Age Category:Shelter Young child Basic Needs Resource Sheet
  • 33. 3310021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Environmental Influences on the provision of Basic Needs (One point required for each Environmental Influence) Basic Need: Age Category: Whānau/Family Culture Safety Education Of Parents And ChildrenHealth Of A Child Basic Needs Resource Sheet
  • 34. 3410021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd My Reference List
  • 35. 3510021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Further References and Resources Bruce, T. & Meggitt, C. (2002). Child care & education (3rd ed.). London: Hodder & Stoughton. Drewery, W. & Bird, L. (2004). Human development in Aotearoa: a journey through life. Sydney: McGraw-Hill. Early Childhood Development. (2001). Children’s needs. Learning and development 0-3 years, 7. Gordon, A.M. & Williams Browne, K. (2000). Beginnings & Beyond (5th ed.) (pp.148-149). Albany, NY: Delmar. Gunstone, H., Matthews, N., Roy, E. & Watson, A. (1996). Journey through families & adolescence (pp.27-32). Melbourne: Longman. Ministry of Education (1996). Te Whāriki: He Whāriki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna a Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Education Council New Zealand (N.D.). Code of Ethics for Certificated Teachers. Retrieved from http://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/content/code-of-ethics-certificated-teachers-0 Royal New Zealand Plunket Society. (2011). Thriving Under 5 (2011 ed.). Auckland: New Zealand. Legislation and Conventions Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008 Care of Children Act 2004 Humans Rights Act 1993 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC) 1989 http://www.education.govt.nz/early-childhood/teaching-and-learning/ece-curriculum/te-whariki/ http://www.educationcouncil.org.nz/content/code-of-ethics-certificated-teachers-0 http://www.businessballs.com/maslow.htm
  • 36. 3610021 POR423 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A One Describe the basic needs of children in an ECE service. One - Meeting the basic needs of an infant Describes how the basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) of an infant are met (two examples for each basic need required). 16 Two – Meeting the basic needs of a toddler Describes how the basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) of a toddler are met (two examples for each basic need required). 18 Three - Meeting the basic needs of a young child Describes how the basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) of a young child are met (two examples for each basic need required). 20 Four - Basic needs and the health and wellbeing of an infant Describes how basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) impact on the health and wellbeing of an infant (one example for each basic need required). 23 Five - Basic needs and the health and wellbeing of a toddler Describes how basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) impact on the health and wellbeing of a toddler (one example for each basic need required). 24 Six - Basic needs and the health and wellbeing of a young child Describes how basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing and feeding) impact on the health and wellbeing of a young child (one example for each basic need required). 25 Seven - Basic needs and the child’s learning and development table complete Describes how basic needs (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing, and feeding) impact of the Learning and Development of children. 27 Two Describe the environmental influences on the provision of basic needs of children in an ECE service Eight - Basic Needs Resource Sheet One basic resource sheet is created. Resource sheet states: - The basic need category selected (clothing, shelter, bathing and cleanliness, sleeping, nurturing, or feeding). - The age category selected (infant, toddler, or young child). Provides one example for each of the environmental influence areas (health of a child, safety, education of children and parents, culture and whānau/family) explaining the impact on the provision of the basic need. 31 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10021 version 4 | level 2 | credits 3 Describe the basic needs of children in an ECE service Assessor’s signature Date achieved