10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1
Learning Guide 2016
This material is under license to PORSE Educa...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 210023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd
What we lea...
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10023
Table of contents
Unit Standard 10023 4
Assessment Criter...
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On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to:
Outcome...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 5
To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 6
Statement of Authenticity
Types of plagiarism
Using a few sente...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 7
Guidelines for referencing
Read the book or reading, then re-writ...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 8
List of definitions
Early childhood setting
Home-based services i...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 9
Learning Activity One - New Situations
The settling of young chil...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10
Transition
Transition is a period when a child moves from one ac...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 11
Learning Activity Two - Analysing Behaviour
Let’s take a closer ...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 12
Helping Young Children Settle
Responding to children’s cues in a...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 13
Assessment Activity One - Minor Transitions
Minor Transitions ar...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 14
Assessment Activity One - Minor Transitions
1
Name the Minor Tra...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 15
Name the Major Transition (Describe the situation in detail)
Typ...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 16
Assessment Activity Two - Major Transitions
2
Name the Major Tra...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 17
Communication Skills
Effective communication occurs when the mes...
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 18
Assessment Activity Three - Communication Strategies
When used e...
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Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)?
...
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Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)?
...
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Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)?
...
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Assessment Activity Four - Health and Safety Strategies
The heal...
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Assessment Activity Four - Health and Safety Strategies
4
Transi...
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My Reference List
10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 25
Further References and Resources
Mathews, C. (2001). Healthy chi...
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Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A
One
Describe t...
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POR425 10023 (Transition Situations)

POR425 10023 (Transition Situations)
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
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Transcripts - POR425 10023 (Transition Situations)

  • 1. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 1 Learning Guide 2016 This material is under license to PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd (PE&T) and may not be reproduced or copied without written permission POR425 Date 10023 Unit Standard Describe transition situations in an ECE service Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 2 The National Certificate in Early Childhood Education & Care (Level 3) SignedOffice use only Achieved First Name Surname School or Area Office Home Address Post Code Email
  • 2. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 210023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd What we learn with pleasure we never forget Alfred Mercer 2
  • 3. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 3 10023 Table of contents Unit Standard 10023 4 Assessment Criteria 5 Plagiarism and Referencing 6 Definitions 8 New Situations 9 Transition 10 Helping Young Children Settle 12 Communication Skills 17 My Reference List 24 Further References 25 Marking Criteria 26
  • 4. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 4 On completion of this Learning Guide you will be able to: Outcome One Describe transition situations where children require settling in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 1.1 Minor and major transition situations where children require settling are described in terms of assisting children to adjust to their new ECE environment. 1.2 Possible cause for children’s unsettled behaviour in the transition situations are described in terms of environment. Outcome Two Describe strategies for assisting Whānau/families and children through transition situations in an ECE Service. Evidence Requirements 2.1 Communication strategies are described in terms of how they assist whānau/families and children through transition situations. 2.2 Health and safety strategies are described in terms of how they assist children through transition situations. Learning Guide Resources Essential readings are in the front pocket of this Learning Guide. Read the Learning Guide in full before commencing this workbook. To successfully complete this Learning Guide you are required to complete all the assessment activities in this Learning Guide. You will need to draw on your own experiences or observations in an ECE service to complete the assessment activities. NZQA unit requirements 10023 Unit Standard Describe transition situations in an ECE service Version 4 | Level 2 | Credits 2
  • 5. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 5 To achieve this unit standard you will need to show competency in all practical and written assessment activities. Use the marking criteria on the last page of this workbook to ensure you have met all the assessment requirements. You are required to meet the following criteria for successful completion: Complete all assessment activities in this Learning Guide to achievement level. Complete child observations, fulfilling all set assessment criteria. Complete all practical assessments in an ECE setting (home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, play groups), and hospital-based services (paediatric playrooms). Practice and interaction with all children must be physically and emotionally safe. Provide evidence of your learning in relation to the Unit Standard in the Child Programme Journal (when appropriate). Complete Child Programme Journal entries (if applicable). Do not be limited by the space given for each response. If you choose to, you can use a computer to type your answers and paste them in the Learning Guide. Alternatively, you can use additional paper if required when writing a response and paste it in the Learning Guide. The programme is competency-based. This is defined by NZQA as “the ability to apply particular knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to the standards of performance required in specific contexts”. Your work will be graded Achieved (A) or Not Achieved (NA). If your work is deemed NA, you will be given guidance on extra work required and have further opportunities to resubmit. Assessment Criteria Icon Key Assessment Activity Icon Assessment Activities demonstrate your understanding of concepts and how to apply them when working with a child. Learning Activity Icon Learning Activities provide background learning in preparation for the assessments and support you to think about and practise new ideas. Readings Icon Readings icon indicates the textbook or article that will best help to support your learning. Website Icon Website icon indicates the additional on-line resources you can access to support your learning. Youtube Icon Youtube icon indicates there is a video you can watch to support your learning. Important Icon You need to pay particular attention to this information, and ensure you understand its meaning. All work must be completed in blue or black pen, NOT pencil or coloured gel pens.
  • 6. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 6 Statement of Authenticity Types of plagiarism Using a few sentences or paragraphs without referencing the source. Copying whole parts of a book, other publications or the internet without referencing the source. Copying another learner’s work or allowing another learner to copy your work. Tutors giving the answers to assessment tasks to learners. As learners sometimes work in group environments, it is important to ensure that the assessment is your own individual work. You acknowledge this is your own individual work by completing, signing and dating the ‘Statement of Authenticity’ below. An activity may be discussed in a team environment and examples of answers can be mentioned, however, every learner needs to contribute and participate in the group activity, recording the answers in their own words. Learners who have written exactly the same answers in their Learning Guides have committed Plagiarism. This is not acceptable as it does not show your individual competence. Please refer to your student handbook or contact your Programme Tutor to obtain access to a copy of ‘A beginners guide to plagiarism’. Plagiarism and Referencing Learner’s name Learner’s signature Date confirm that this is an original assessment and is entirely my own work. It contains no material previously published or written by another person except where I have acknowledged this in the text. I Plagiarism, or copying of another’s work without referencing, is not acceptable.
  • 7. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 7 Guidelines for referencing Read the book or reading, then re-write your understanding of it in your own words. If you want to quote a particular sentence or paragraph, you must acknowledge the author. For example: Penrose (1998) says “play is a major means by which children learn and develop” (p.7). OR “talking to and with children encourages their thinking” (Penrose, 1998, p.7). You will find the published date usually on the back of the first page of the book or on the list of readings given to you. At the end of your writing you should list all books, journals/articles or websites/web pages you have made reference to in completing this learning guide. For example: Type of Ref Example Book Penrose, P. (1998). Take another look (23rd ed.) Auckland: New Zealand Playcentre Federation. Journal / Article Stonehouse, A. (2011). The more you know, the more you see. The space for anything about early childhood, Issue no.27, Autumn 2012, 14-15. Website Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead. Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ Web page Ministry of Education (2012). Early Childhood Education: ECE Lead (Home Based ECE Services). Retrieved from http://www.lead.ece.govt.nz/ServiceTypes/HomeBasedECEServices.aspx For further information on APA referencing, go to http://owll.massey.ac.nz/pdf/Academic-Writing-Guide.pdf
  • 8. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 8 List of definitions Early childhood setting Home-based services including a child’s family environment, centre-based services (childcare centres, kindergartens, play centres, Kohanga Reo, playgroups), hospital-based service (paediatric playrooms). Educator Persons and groups including teachers, supervisors, co-ordinators, whānau/families, and nannies who are involved in the learning and the development of children. Minor Transition Is defined as a situation where a smaller or less important change occurs from one position or condition to another eg transitions or short-term separation; sleep time; travelling in a vehicle; when child is unwell, hurt, distressed, angry, aggressive; moving from one area to another within the service. Major Transition Is defined as a situation where a greater or more important change occurs from one position or condition to another eg beginning in an early childhood service; moving from an early childhood service to school; the death of a family member; moving house. Caregiver Refers to the person primarily responsible for the child. Whānau/Families May be parents, guardians, or members of the extended family who have an interest in the child. Young children Children between the years of birth to school entry. Three ‘broad age ranges’ are identified and the overlapping age categories are: Infant birth to eighteen months Toddler one year to three years Young child two and a half years to school entry age Definitions 8
  • 9. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 9 Learning Activity One - New Situations The settling of young children should be handled in a sensitive, responsive, warm and consistent way. In everyday life, children face change and challenge in many situations, from minor disappointments and hassles through to more major events like beginning in an early childhood service. As the adult, it is your role to ensure the child in your care is settled and happy. As children are supported through change (settling), they develop resilience and are better able to cope with future change. 1 1. How do you feel when in a strange or new situation? 2. Do you think a child might also feel like this? Why?
  • 10. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 10 Transition Transition is a period when a child moves from one activity to the next, or encounters situations they have never experienced before. For example, moving from play to a regular event such as bathing or resting (Saifer, 2002), or moving house or to another country. When a mother (attachment figure) leaves her child with a caregiver or babysitter it involves separation anxiety. In these short-term separation situations settling the child is often more difficult. Causes of Unsettled Behaviour Parents and caregivers need to recognise what the cause of the unsettled behaviour might be. In doing so, they are better prepared to prevent or deal with the situation in an appropriate way. Reading One Greenman, J. & Stonehouse, A. (1997). Prime times: A handbook for excellence in infant and toddler programs (pp. 99-103). Melbourne: Longman. Reading Two Gazel, C. (2010). Happy Handovers Feature. Littlies, May 2010. Possible causes of a young child’s unsettled behaviour could be: Cultural influences (eg being cared for by someone not from the same cultural environment) Social interaction (eg starting at a new ECE service and doesn’t know anyone in the service) Not prepared or pre-warned of the imminent change Child does not understand what is expected Missing security item eg teddy bear, blanket, soother Unfamiliar environment Separation anxiety (eg mother returning to work) Pick up and drop off time is rushed Frightened Hungry Tired
  • 11. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 11 Learning Activity Two - Analysing Behaviour Let’s take a closer look at situations where children may become unsettled and what caused the behaviour to occur. Read the scenario below and record your response to the following questions: 2 Four-year old Helina is playing happily with three of her friends outside. They are laughing and making zooming noises as they ride their bikes around and around on the path. Unexpectedly, Helina and one of her friends collide. Helina bumps her knee and gets a fright. She starts to cry and, looking around, sees her educator Malcolm standing nearby. She calls out to Malcolm, and then runs to his side. Malcolm talks calmly to Helina and gently rubs her knee. Within a few moments, Helina wipes away her tears and begins to smile. Malcolm helps her back on her bike, and she is off again, calling out to her friends. Helina has learnt over time that she can trust Malcolm to be reassuring and encouraging when she is upset or frightened. (Rolfe, 2004, p.4.) Reading Three Stoppard, M. (1995). Complete baby and childcare (pp.144-145). Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin Books Australia Ltd Today’s families are part of a mobile society – going out to work, play and shop as well as travelling away on holidays. As you read the next article think about the various ways children may become uncomfortable when travelling and how you could prevent this. 1. Identify the situation that led to the unsettled behaviour. 2. What was the cause of Helina’s unsettled behaviour? 3. How did her Educator cope with the situation?
  • 12. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 12 Helping Young Children Settle Responding to children’s cues in a positive way enables educators to build trusting relationships with the children they work with. This is particularly important for the infant or toddler who may be distressed and confused by too much change, undermining feelings of safety and trust (Rolfe, 2002). There are many methods of settling young children, including: Being ‘tuned in’ to ‘read’ the child’s needs Discussing with the parent the way they comfort and settle the child, creating consistency Talking to the child, asking how you can help Support the child and acknowledge their feelings Follow a no surprises approach – talk about possible issues before they arise Have favourite toys available Soothing – whispering, talking softly Cuddling and caressing Be with/beside the child Being familiar with child’s routines and method of communication Distraction – offer alternative eg “Let’s read a story”…..”Go for a walk”….. ”Have some apple”. Careful consideration needs to be given to the health and wellbeing of the child when deciding which method is best to reduce any stress he/she might be experiencing. It is important to maintain and promote a child’s sense of belonging and secure attachment by acknowledging the child’s feelings, which is part of his/her emotional health and wellbeing.
  • 13. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 13 Assessment Activity One - Minor Transitions Minor Transitions are defined as a situation where a smaller or less important change occurs from one position or condition to another eg sleep time, travelling in a vehicle, when the child is unwell, hurt, distressed, angry, aggressive, or moving from one area to another within the service. Think about two minor transition situations you may encounter in an ECE service where you would have to settle a child: 1. State the type of ECE service (centre-based, home-based, or hospital-based) and the age category of the child/ren for the identified minor transition situations. 2. Identify the name of the minor transition, then describe in detail the transition situation and answer the questions following. 1 Name the Minor Transition (Describe the situation in detail) Type of ECE Service Age Category Scenario 1 What are the possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour? (two causes required) How are you going to assist the child to settle?(two settling techniques required)
  • 14. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 14 Assessment Activity One - Minor Transitions 1 Name the Minor Transition (Describe the situation in detail) Scenario 2 What are the possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour? (two causes required) How are you going to assist the child to settle?(two settling techniques required)
  • 15. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 15 Name the Major Transition (Describe the situation in detail) Type of ECE Service Age Category Scenario 1 What are the possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour? (two causes required) How are you going to assist the child to settle?(two settling techniques required) Assessment Activity Two - Major Transitions Major Transitions are defined as a situation where a greater or more important change occurs from one position or condition to another eg beginning in an early childhood service, moving from an early childhood service to school, the death of a family member, or moving house. Think about two major transition situations you may encounter in an ECE service where you would have to settle a child. Identify the name of the major transition, then describe in detail the transition situation and answer the questions following: 2
  • 16. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 16 Assessment Activity Two - Major Transitions 2 Name the Major Transition (Describe the situation in detail) Scenario 2 What are the possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour? (two causes required) How are you going to assist the child to settle?(two settling techniques required)
  • 17. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 17 Communication Skills Effective communication occurs when the messages given are the same as the one received. To achieve this the relationship, culture, and situation must be taken into consideration. Effective communication supports positive learning outcomes. To achieve positive learning outcomes with a child, adults need to establish reciprocal (two- way) and responsive (tuned-in) relationships with young children and with other adults for effective interactions to occur. Early childhood services use communication strategies such as reflective listening, redirecting, comforting, planning and consultation to establish and maintain these types of relationships. When open and trusting relationships are established between educators, whānau/families, and the child, positive learning outcomes can be achieved for the children. (Ministry of Education, 2009). Watch this youtube clip to see Relective Listening in practice. Colton, J. (2012). Reflective Listening. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95lANl1oeBk Communication Strategies Planning The process of making plans - discussing a course of action. Redirecting To divert attention and to change the course or direction of the child’s focus. Comforting To soothe, console, reassure and offer comfort with words and actions. Consultation The action or process of consulting or discussing with a child and/or child’s family/whānau. Reflective Listening Listener responds to the speaker by repeating back what the speaker has said (words and feelings).
  • 18. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 18 Assessment Activity Three - Communication Strategies When used effectively, communication strategies such as reflective listening, redirecting, comforting, planning and consultation can help you as an educator to assist whānau/families and children through transition situations. 1. State the type of ECE service (centre-based, home-based, or hospital-based) and the age category (infant, toddler, or young child) of the child/ren in care. 2. Think about how you use communication strategies in an ECE service and answer the questions in the table on the following pages: 3 Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)? Example Active Listening Example When you are actively listening you are showing you are attentive and interested in the child by adopting an alert listening posture (eg making eye contact, using open body language and gestures, leaning forward and being square-on with the speaker, listening for main points, don’t fidget too much). Encourage the speaker by using verbal response (eg ‘Yes’ ‘Mmm’ and ‘I see’). Ask open-ended questions. Avoid making judgements. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Active Listening to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Example I use active listening by making eye contact and nodding my head when the parents are sharing information about their child with me. This shows the parents that I am listening to them and they are able to share information with me that will assist me to settle their child. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Active Listening to assist the child through a transition situation. Example They know that you are there for them and engaging with them. They see you actively listening by having eye contact with them and being attentive to what you are saying. This shows you are listening to them and will respond to their communication. Type of ECE Service Home-based Age Category Toddler Example
  • 19. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 19 Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)? Reflective Listening Give an example to explain how you would/could use Reflective Listening to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Reflective Listening to assist the child through a transition situation. Redirecting Give an example to explain how you would/could use Redirecting to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Redirecting to assist the child through a transition situation. Type of ECE Service Age Category Assessment Activity Three - Communication Strategies 3
  • 20. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 20 Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)? Comforting Give an example to explain how you would/could use Comforting Listening to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Comforting Listening to assist the child through a transition situation. Planning Give an example to explain how you would/could use Planning to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Planning to assist the child through a transition situation. Assessment Activity Three - Communication Strategies 3
  • 21. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 21 Communication Strategy Define the strategy (what does it mean)? Consultation Give an example to explain how you would/could use Consultation to assist the whānau/family through a transition situation. Give an example to explain how you would/could use Consultation to assist the child through a transition situation. Assessment Activity Three - Communication Strategies 3
  • 22. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 22 Assessment Activity Four - Health and Safety Strategies The health and wellbeing of a child in any situation is your number one priority, especially if the situation is likely to cause unwelcome stress to both the child and the whānau/family. Transition situations, particularly if they are new, can cause undue stress that could affect the health and wellbeing of a child. Think about four transition situations you may experience in an ECE service and describe these situations below. Transition Situations How do I ensure that the HEALTH needs of the child are met in these transition situations? Two points required. What SAFETY strategies do I need to be aware of in these transition situations? How do I prevent injury? Two safety strategies required. Example Transition Situation You are looking after a four-year old child in your own home. You have looked after the child during the day but this is the first time you have looked after the child overnight. Example Make sure the child is comfortable and has all she needs before leaving the room. Make sure the child has had something to eat and drink, and has gone to the toilet before going to bed. Example Ensure windows are secured so the child cannot climb out. Clear the floor of all clutter and trip hazards. 4
  • 23. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 23 Assessment Activity Four - Health and Safety Strategies 4 Transition Situations How do I ensure that the HEALTH needs of the child are met in these transition situations? Two points required. What SAFETY strategies do I need to be aware of in these transition situations? How do I prevent injury? Two safety strategies required.
  • 24. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 24 My Reference List
  • 25. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 25 Further References and Resources Mathews, C. (2001). Healthy children: A guide for child care. Eastgardens, NSW: MacLennan and Petty Pty Limited. Ministry of Education (1996). Te Whariki: He Whariki Matauranga mo nga Mokopuna a Aotearoa: Early Childhood Curriculum. Wellington: Learning Media. Rolfe, S.A. (2002). Promoting resilience in children. Watson, ACT: Australian Early Childhood Association. Rolfe, S. (2004). Rethinking attachment for early childhood practice. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin. Saifer, S. (2002). Practical solutions to practically every problem (New Zealand edition adapted by C. Hamer). Lower Hutt: Open Mind Publishing. Stoppard, M. (1995). Complete baby and child care (pp. 114-115). Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin Books Australia Ltd. O’Rourke, S. & Barnett, S. (2008). Communication: organisation and innovation (2nd Ed). Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson Education New Zealand. Legislation and Conventions Education Act 1989 Education (Early Childhood Services) Regulations 2008 http://www.education.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Early-Childhood/te-whariki.pdf
  • 26. 10023 POR425 ©2016 PORSE Education & Training (NZ) Ltd 26 Outcome Assessment Activity | Judgement Page(s) A One Describe transition situations where children require settling in an ECE service. One – Minor Transitions For scenarios one and two: Describes two minor transition situations for the stated ECE service. Describes two possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour for both minor transition situations (four causes in total). Describes two settling techniques that assisted the child to settle for both minor transition situations (four settling techniques in total). 13 Two – Major Transitions For scenarios one and two: Describes two major transition situations. Describes two possible causes for the child’s unsettled behaviour for both major transition situations (four causes in total). Describes two settling techniques that assisted the child to settle for both major transition situations (four settling techniques in total). 15 Two Describe strategies for assisting whānau/ families and children through transition situations. Three – Communication Strategies Communication strategies table is complete and contains the following information: Communication strategies (reflective listening, redirecting, comforting, planning and consultation) are described (definition). Describes how each communication strategy assists the whānau/family and the child through transition situations. 18 Four – Transitioning a Child (Health & Safety Strategies) Describes four transition situations. Two health and two safety strategies are described that would assist the child for each of the four transition situations. 23 Marking Criteria Unit Standard 10023 version 4 | level 2 | credits 2 Describe transition situations in an ECE service. Assessor’s signature Date achieved