Political Wisdom
L. Michelle Price – August 18, 2013
For MOL 5110 Organizational Politics
Dr. Carl B. Summer
Political Wisdom
During the last few weeks and over the
course of my work life I have gained a bit of
political wisdom. No...
Don’t Keep My Head in the Sand
Don’t Keep My Head in the Sand
Early in my career, the first political mistakes I made were how I
misread political signal...
Don’t keep my head in the sand
• Be much more proactive instead of reactive.
• Be aware of the political things within my
...
Being Tough is Not Being Mean
But sometimes you have to give bad news…….
Being Tough is Not Being Mean
In my week 4 Analysis, I was faced with having to be the one to
let 24 people know they no l...
Being Tough is Not Being Mean
• Making tough employee decisions is
necessary.
• Keep team members aware of expectations
an...
It is Naive to Think that Everyone
Thinks Like You Do
It is Naive to Think that Everyone
Thinks Like You Do
My week three analysis focused on how I was overlooked for
promotion...
It is Naive to Think that Everyone
Thinks Like You Do
• Making sure to be seen as promotable by doing great work and
then ...
Summary
This course has taught me that sometimes I have to make tough choices and give people
really bad news. But, that I...
References
• Brandon, R., and Seldman, M., (2004),
Survival of the Savvy, High-Integrity Political Tactics for Career
and ...
of 13

Political wisdom presentation L. Michelle Price for MOL 5110

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: News & Politics      Career      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Political wisdom presentation L. Michelle Price for MOL 5110

  • 1. Political Wisdom L. Michelle Price – August 18, 2013 For MOL 5110 Organizational Politics Dr. Carl B. Summer
  • 2. Political Wisdom During the last few weeks and over the course of my work life I have gained a bit of political wisdom. Now that I have the vocabulary to label the things that I have learned it makes it much easier to reflect on and disseminate the information to others. Following are a few of the lessons that have been world-changing to me.
  • 3. Don’t Keep My Head in the Sand
  • 4. Don’t Keep My Head in the Sand Early in my career, the first political mistakes I made were how I misread political signals. From my week two analysis, I was set up by coworkers that didn’t like me and were trying to send me to JAIL! Before this major event, I treated the situation like they were "school girls that didn't like me" so just ignore them. In reality, these were co-workers that were not happy with their career path, and envious of mine. This escalated a bad situation into a potential disaster. • Brandon(2004) calls this "Behind-the-scenes-sabotage" (p.19). Not paying attention to them helped to inflame their animosity. This was a political blind spot.
  • 5. Don’t keep my head in the sand • Be much more proactive instead of reactive. • Be aware of the political things within my organization. • "Power of Savvy leaders detect deception in the form of misleading information, sabotage, and private power pockets. They use their awareness and skills to make good decisions about internal hires and promotions as well as external vendors and partners"(p.55). What I’ve learned:
  • 6. Being Tough is Not Being Mean But sometimes you have to give bad news…….
  • 7. Being Tough is Not Being Mean In my week 4 Analysis, I was faced with having to be the one to let 24 people know they no longer had jobs. My company purchased an existing station and changed the format. It wasn’t feasible to turn a team of 60-year old easy listening announcers into a social media savvy, Pop DJs. But that didn’t make letting them know they would not stay with the station any easier. • Brandon(2004) suggests that "developing one's strengths is more important than fixing weaknesses" (p.68). I concur that spending time and money to correct someone's typing skills, when they are a much better salesperson is not as productive as retraining that person to be a great sales person, or finding someone that can type.
  • 8. Being Tough is Not Being Mean • Making tough employee decisions is necessary. • Keep team members aware of expectations and how they benefit the whole. • When transitioning a team member, direct them in areas best suited for their talent. • Keeping someone in a job they are not suited for hurts the company, the person and the leader. What I’ve learned:
  • 9. It is Naive to Think that Everyone Thinks Like You Do
  • 10. It is Naive to Think that Everyone Thinks Like You Do My week three analysis focused on how I was overlooked for promotion until I actually got the nerve to ask. I had been caught in the loop of believing that since I worked hard, someone would notice my efforts and promote me. It never happened… until I stood up for myself. • Buchanan highlights "Nice girls don't get the corner office" (p. 168). This lesson for me and other women in the workplace was really revelatory. The text shows how girls are taught that success depends on being "lady-like". We are taught to be polite, agreeable, and less confrontational. Yet, these are the traits that cause an employee to be overlooked at promotion time. Buchanan references, "less confrontational ways of wielding power prevent women from increasing their organizational visibility and influence" (p. 168).
  • 11. It is Naive to Think that Everyone Thinks Like You Do • Making sure to be seen as promotable by doing great work and then telling the right people about it. • Don’t only play “nice” when everyone else is playing to win! • If you are More Political and you believe that it is your right to "shimmy" your way to the top because "that is how the world works". This makes you a manipulator. This is wrong! • If you are a Less Political and believe that everyone else is too, you will be overlooked for promotion and can probably list the number of times that you did not receive credit for your hard work. For you, it is easier to say, "my work should speak for me" because you are to afraid to speak for yourself. This is wrong! What I’ve learned:
  • 12. Summary This course has taught me that sometimes I have to make tough choices and give people really bad news. But, that I have to do what is best for the organization and best for the person. I try to make sure that I encourage everyone to know themselves and what they do best, and seek out what God made them for. When I think about how afraid I was, early in my career, to speak the words that I wanted a promotion, I realize how less political I was. I thought that if I said I wanted to be boss, he would think that I was being conceited or full of myself. If I had never pushed through the fear and asked, I would never have done the things that I have. Many times we think someone will tell us no, so we don't ask. I have learned to never tell myself no when it comes to accomplishing a task, or believing for promotion. It is an automatic failure if I tell myself no before I give someone else to tell me yes. Organizations are made up of many types of people. I wouldn't lie on someone else and it never crossed my mind that a co-worker would try to go after me in that way. But, I now understand that as a member of an organization, it is naive to think that everyone thinks like you/I do. Both political styles have merit and weakness, but it is important to find the vital balance of power.
  • 13. References • Brandon, R., and Seldman, M., (2004), Survival of the Savvy, High-Integrity Political Tactics for Career and Company Success, New York, Free Press • Buchanan, D. A., & Badham, R.J. (2008). Power, Politics, and Organizational Change: Winning the Turf Game. London, UK: Sage Publications, Ltd. ISBN: 978-1-4129-2833-5.

Related Documents