Exploring narrative voice
The narrator is a creation the author uses to:
• Organise
• Select
• Present information
The narrator may also:
• Comment ...
Consider these aspects:
• A. Pronoun p-o-v: First (I, We)/Second (You)/Third
Person (He, She, It, They)
• B. Narrator’s de...
A narrator can:
Either:
Or
• Belong to the same reality as • Stand outside the story
the characters
• Tell the story witho...
Introducing Lockwood as the ‘frame narrator’
Lockwood is not the only narrator in
Wuthering Heights. However, his
narrativ...
Compare Lockwood’s and Nelly’s narratives
Lockwook
• On opening the little door, two hairy monsters flew at my throat, bearing me down, and
extinguishing the light;...
• What can you say about the narrative voice of
these extracts?
Extract One
.
My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my
infant tongue could make of both name...
Extract Two
As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said, "Sir, all that
you have said is well; now, ...
Extract Three
There was music from my neighbor's house through the
summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came a...
Extract Four
• Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the
deficiency of nature had been but little assisted
by education ...
Extract Five
• Mr. Jeavons said that I liked maths because it
was safe. He said I liked maths because it
meant solving pro...
Narrative voice 6th form
of 14

Narrative voice 6th form

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narrative voice 6th form

  • 1. Exploring narrative voice
  • 2. The narrator is a creation the author uses to: • Organise • Select • Present information The narrator may also: • Comment and judge • Directly address the reader • Be a participant in their own narrative • Be a detached observer • Be ‘transparent’, appearing to speak for the author
  • 3. Consider these aspects: • A. Pronoun p-o-v: First (I, We)/Second (You)/Third Person (He, She, It, They) • B. Narrator’s degree of Omniscience; Full, Limited, None • C. Narrator’s degree of Objectivity; Complete, None, Some, Ironic • D. Narrator’s Un/Reliability
  • 4. A narrator can: Either: Or • Belong to the same reality as • Stand outside the story the characters • Tell the story without any • Participate in the story involvement • Be perceptive • Misread events • Play a role in the story (the • Be ‘invisible’ (the reader is reader is aware of the narrator unaware of any narrator) as a character) • Be unreliable (deliberately • Be reliable (the reader believes misleading) or inadequate what the narrator relates) (unperceptive)
  • 5. Introducing Lockwood as the ‘frame narrator’ Lockwood is not the only narrator in Wuthering Heights. However, his narrative contains all the other stories. This type of narrator is called a ‘frame narrator’. This provides an alternating point of view. One of the ways to frame the narrative is by adding epistolary elements.
  • 6. Compare Lockwood’s and Nelly’s narratives
  • 7. Lockwook • On opening the little door, two hairy monsters flew at my throat, bearing me down, and extinguishing the light; while a mingled guffaw from Heathcliff and Hareton put the copestone on my rage and humiliation. Fortunately, the beasts seemed more bent on stretching their paws, and yawning, and flourishing their tails, than devouring me alive; but they would suffer no resurrection, and I was forced to lie till their malignant masters pleased to deliver me: then, hatless and trembling with wrath, I ordered the miscreants to let me out—on their peril to keep me one minute longer—with several incoherent threats of retaliation that, in their indefinite depth of virulency, smacked of King Lear Ellen • As I spoke, I observed a large dog lying on the sunny grass beneath raise its ears as if about to bark, and then smoothing them back, announce, by a wag of the tail, that some one approached whom it did not consider a stranger. Mrs. Linton bent forward, and listened breathlessly. The minute after a step traversed the hall; the open house was too tempting for Heathcliff to resist walking in: most likely he supposed that I was inclined to shirk my promise, and so resolved to trust to his own audacity. With straining eagerness Catherine gazed towards the entrance of her chamber. He did not hit the right room directly: she motioned me to admit him, but he found it out ere I could reach the door, and in a stride or two was at her side, and had her grasped in his arms.
  • 8. • What can you say about the narrative voice of these extracts?
  • 9. Extract One . My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip. I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister - Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair.
  • 10. Extract Two As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said, "Sir, all that you have said is well; now, however, order the tongues of the victims to be cut, and mix wine that we may make drink-offerings to Neptune, and the other immortals, and then go to bed, for it is bed time. People should go away early and not keep late hours at a religious festival." Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Men servants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filled the mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after giving every man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of the victims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings. When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as he was minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board their ship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.
  • 11. Extract Three There was music from my neighbor's house through the summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars. At high tide in the afternoon I watched his guests diving from the tower of his raft or taking the sun on the hot sand of his beach while his two motor-boats slit the waters of the Sound, drawing aquaplanes over cataracts of foam. On week-ends his Rolls-Royce became an omnibus, bearing parties to and from the city, between nine in the morning and long past midnight, while his station wagon scampered like a brisk yellow bug to meet all trains. And on Mondays eight servants including an extra gardener toiled all day with mops and scrubbing-brushes and hammers and garden-shears, repairing the ravages of the night before.
  • 12. Extract Four • Mr. Collins was not a sensible man, and the deficiency of nature had been but little assisted by education or society; the greatest part of his life having been spent under the guidance of an illiterate and miserly father; and though he belonged to one of the universities, he had merely kept the necessary terms, without forming at it any useful acquaintance. The subjection in which his father had brought him up had given him originally great humility of manner; but it was now a good deal counteracted by the self-conceit of a weak head.
  • 13. Extract Five • Mr. Jeavons said that I liked maths because it was safe. He said I liked maths because it meant solving problems, and these problems were difficult and interesting but there was always a straightforward answer at the end. And what he meant was that maths wasn’t like life because in life there are no straightforward answers at the end.