1 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Light and darkAss...
3 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
4 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen Trenyce ...
5 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Life cycles: ourselv...
6 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
7 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesTrenyce drew ...
8 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Life cycles: butterf...
9 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen observin...
10 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Teddy materialsAss...
11 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s note...
12 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating how ...
13 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 The Garden Gang...
14 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceShe actively visited the b...
15 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thin...
16 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP p...
17 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Ourselves...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y1_s1

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
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Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y1_s1

  • 1. 1 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Trenyce (Year 1 securelevel 1)Child profileAs is often the case for Year 1 children, Trenyce makes observable progress within level 1 over a relativelyshort period, and here her work moves from very simple low level 1 achievement to a secure level 1 judgement.The evidence1. Light and dark2. Life cycles: ourselves3. Life cycles: butterflies4. Teddy materials5. Investigating how to keep Teddy dry6. The Garden Gang – growing plantsQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Light and darkAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4ContextThe class shared the book, Can’t You Sleep, Little Bear? The children were keen to communicate and theninvestigate their ideas to help Little Bear in the dark cave.Little Bear is afraid of the dark and Big Bear provides lanterns of increasing size to light up their cave. Finally,they go outside and Big Bear shows Little Bear the Moon.The children were asked to brainstorm the names of some light sources. They each then chose five or more ofthem to make drawings and to order them, from the brightest to the dimmest.In the following lesson, without any initial discussion, they were given four pictures of light sources tosequence.Waddell, M. illustrated by Firth, B (2005) Can’t You Sleep, Little Bear? Walker Books Ltd., UKQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen Trenyce was prompted, encouraged and supported, she could show her understanding of this topic indifferent ways: verbally by sharing ideas and describing observations, presenting evidence in a templateprovided, and through her own drawings.Her responses were not always correct and she often referred to an adult to seek clarification. Sheremembered using candles for birthday cakes and, when asked, said that they were not any good for lightingup a whole room.Next steps Use of bright and dim torches to explore things in the dark (using a very large box with various objects inside). Investigating the differences between light sources and objects that reflect light.Assessment commentaryTrenyce can begin to order objects according to their features and can use a fixed format to present aconclusion based on previous learning. She is beginning to show awareness of links between ideas developedat school and her prior experiences at home.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Life cycles: ourselvesAssessment focusesAF3, AF5ContextChildren had considered ideas about themselves in their work in the Early Years Foundation Stage. The activityhere was planned as a diagnostic assessment task at the beginning of a unit on ‘Ourselves’ to find out abouttheir current understanding. They were asked to draw pictures of themselves as babies, as they are now, andas they think they might be as adults. They then talked about the changes.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesTrenyce drew the pictures independently putting an individual drawing in each box. She did not follow thetemplate correctly and, when asked, it was clear that this was a reflection of her reading ability. Her drawingsdo not clearly show the changes from being a baby to being an adult, other than the increase in size. However,she could say that when she was a baby she ‘couldn’t walk or feed myself’. She said that when she was anadult she would have ‘longer hair and wear bigger clothes’.Next steps Use of visual and creative aids, including scaled cut-outs of stages of the human life cycle, and sorting these and cards with text labels into a sequence.Assessment commentaryThe evidence shows Trenyce describing the changes from baby to adult, using some everyday terms, andpresenting this independently in a template, although not in the prescribed order.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Life cycles: butterfliesAssessment focusesAF1, AF3ContextThis activity took place towards the end of the unit of work about ‘Ourselves’. The children had previouslylooked at how we grow from babies to adults and they had compared people to other animals.The children had the opportunity to look closely at caterpillars, in specially provided jars with food supplies, andto discuss how the caterpillars would change as they grew and got older.As a class, they were asked to think about where butterflies came from. They looked at pictures and a videoclip of butterflies and their life cycles.They were asked to record what they knew about the life cycle of butterflies, so that they could apply theirprevious learning and combine this with the new information from observations, discussions and the films. Itwas suggested that they used arrows to show the sequencing, as they had seen before, but after that theywere free to devise their own representations.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen observing the caterpillars, Trenyce said that they were ‘getting bigger’. She asked some questionsincluding, ‘What is the stuff in with them?’ and ‘Will they really turn into butterflies?’She drew the different stages of the life cycle in the correct order and attempted to use simple arrows, althoughshe shows the stages in a linear way. She was working with an adult at her table and was given some supportin structuring her drawings but was able to talk about the stages independently. By the end of the lesson sheshowed confidence in talking about the life cycle of a butterfly.Next steps Clarification of the use of the term ‘cycle’ to indicate that the pattern repeats, with the butterflies producing eggs to start the next generation of life. Further work on reporting sequenced events in graphic format, including use of ICT for work on life cycles. Focus on observation drawing (do caterpillars really have smiley faces?), linked with art.Assessment commentaryTrenyce asks questions stimulated by her observations and successfully reports a sequence of events basedon observation and on secondary information sources.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Teddy materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF4ContextChildren were asked to bring in different materials that they could find in their indoor and outdoor environments.They reviewed earlier work about senses, and talked about the look and feel of the materials and how theycould be sorted into groups.They were given a template of a teddy with various labels, such as ‘soft’ and ‘shiny’. All the materials wereplaced together in the middle of the room and children had to work independently to find the right ones to stickonto the different parts of the teddy.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesTrenyce used phrases such as, ‘this is crackly’, ‘it’s shiny’, and ‘it’s all soft’. No support other thanencouragement was given and she did manage to find suitable materials for most of the properties.Next steps Opportunities for Trenyce to begin to develop her own questions to investigate based on properties of materials and their suitability for different purposes. Consideration of how properties can be used to sort and group materials, objects and living things.Assessment commentaryTrenyce was able to name and talk about properties of materials that can be detected using appropriatesenses.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating how to keep Teddy dryAssessment focusesAF2, AF4, AF5ContextThe children brought different materials into school, and they were asked how they could find out which onewould be best at keeping Teddy dry in the rain.They were provided with the structure for a simple investigation, which involved sitting Teddy underneathdifferent materials and pouring water on from a watering can. The children were asked to comment on whatthey might observe and what might happen.The children then carried out the investigation outside, substituting plastic animals for the teddy.The evidenceTeacher’s notesWhen speaking to the whole class, Trenyce did not volunteer suggestions about how to find out an answer.However, in a smaller group she was able to say that, ‘we could put Teddy in the rain’. With further questioningand encouragement, it was evident that she understood that Teddy would have to wear different things in therain to see what was best to keep him dry.After the experiment she was initially unable to say what we had found out, but when asked which material wasbest for keeping Teddy dry she correctly pointed to the plastic. She explained that she knew this ‘because thewater fell off of it’.Next steps Further investigations to encourage recording of observations and measurements using simple equipment.Assessment commentaryTrenyce is able to identify a link to science in a familiar object. With prompting, she makes simple suggestionsabout how to find an answer and uses her senses and simple equipment to make observations. She can statesome expectations of a simple investigation and can provide a meaningful comment on what happens.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 The Garden Gang – growing plantsAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThis work was linked to a literacy activity based on The Garden Gang series of books.The class had been learning about food. They had sorted different types of food and talked about what farmersdo. They looked at some potatoes, grown some time before in buckets. The buckets had become waterlogged,the potato plants were beginning to die back, and the potatoes themselves were starting to decay.Following suggestions from the children, the class planted potatoes, runner beans, radishes, peppers, onionsand grass seed. For the runner beans, each child also planted a bean in a clear plastic beaker with a wet papertowel. The children were able to observe how the beans were growing, making comparisons between the onein the beaker and the one in the soil.The various plants also provided contexts for some work in mathematics, and the children made modelgardens for design and technology work.Fisher, J. (1979–1980) The Garden Gang series, Ladybird Books Ltd., UKThe evidenceTrenyce could say that the runner bean ‘needs soil to grow’ and with prompting she could also say that shewould have to ‘give it water’ and ‘put it outside for the sun’. She said it would ‘grow leaves’ but didnt say whatmight happen to the bean in the plastic beaker.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceShe actively visited the beans each morning and was enthusiastic about showing how the bean in the beakerwas ‘growing up’. As both beans grew she was able to talk about the leaves and the roots ‘getting bigger’.When asked what would happen to the beans, she said, ‘we could eat them’.She asked about the grass seedlings, ‘Is this the same as the grass in real gardens?’Teacher’s notesTrenyce said, when talking about the potatoes, ‘there’s too much water, it’s all soggy’. When asked what shewould expect to find when she pulled up the plants she knew that there would be potatoes ‘by the roots’. Sheobserved that the potatoes were ‘a bit squashy’.Next steps Investigate the conditions that plants need to grow. Discussion of how farmers and gardeners use ways to make sure that their plants grow as healthily as possible. Simple comparison of life processes of plants and animals.Assessment commentaryTrenyce recognises that the plants she has grown can be eaten. She uses everyday terms to talk about hersensed observations of plants and the changes they go through.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyTrenyce asks questions and provides simple descriptions, recognising basic features and properties, anddraws on her everyday experience.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceShe understands that plants provide food and, in simple terms, that the conditions in which plants are grownmake a difference to them. She is beginning to identify links to science in familiar contexts.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceShe uses everyday terms to communicate her observations and uses a given template for them, and also agiven format to show a sequence of events.AF4 Using investigative approachesIn talking about materials, butterflies and plants, Trenyce shows that she is using her senses and some simpleequipment in her observations, and she is beginning to make simple suggestions about how to find things outthrough observation.AF5 Working critically with evidenceIn simple ways in spoken language, Trenyce can make statements of what she sees, including changes toliving things. She is beginning to be able to make a statement of her expectations of a simple investigation.Overall assessment judgementThe first pieces of evidence in this collection show Trenyce working at low level 1 but she makes progressthrough the level during the two terms from which this evidence is drawn, and her further work is at securelevel 1.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 1 and 2 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the applications AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically and implications of science collaborating in science approaches with evidence L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 2 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Draw on their observations and  Express personal feelings or opinions about  Present their ideas and evidence in  Make some suggestions about how  Say what happened in their ideas to offer answers to scientific or technological phenomena appropriate ways to find things out or how to collect experiment or investigation questions data to answer a question or idea  Describe, in familiar contexts, how science  Respond to prompts by using simple texts  Say whether what happened they are investigating  Make comparisons between basic helps people do things and electronic media to find information was what they expected, features or components of  Identify things to measure or acknowledging any  Identify people who use science to help  Use simple scientific vocabulary to describe objects, living things or events observe that are relevant to the unexpected outcomes others their ideas and observations question or idea they are  Sort and group objects, living  Respond to prompts to suggest  Identify scientific or technological  Work together on an experiment or investigating things or events on the basis of different ways they could have phenomena and say whether or not they are investigation and recognise contributions what they have observed  Correctly use equipment provided to done things helpful made by others make observations and  Respond to suggestions to measurements identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Make measurements, using or measurements) needed to standard or non-standard units as answer a question appropriate L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 1 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Ask questions stimulated by their  Identify a link to science in familiar objects  Use everyday terms to describe simple  Respond to prompts by making  Respond to prompts to say exploration of their world or contexts features or actions of objects, living things some simple suggestions about how what happened or events they observe to find an answer or make  Recognise basic features of  Recognise scientific and technological  Say what has changed when observations objects, living things or events developments that help us  Present evidence they have collected in observing objects, living things simple templates provided for them  Use their senses and simple or events  Draw on their everyday equipment to make observations experience to help answer  Communicate simple features or questions components of objects, living things or events they have observed in appropriate  Respond to suggestions to forms identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Share their own ideas and listen to the ideas or measurements) that has been of others used to answer a question     BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 1 Secure 1  High 1 Low 2 Secure 2 High 2 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Ourselves’ worksheet © The Windmill Press. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-03 © Crown copyright 2009