1 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating where ...
3 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
4 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript: What I need...
5 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript We found o...
6 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Encouragement ...
7 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Bird dataAssessment ...
8 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
9 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Further practi...
10 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 The human life cyc...
11 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Finding out ...
12 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 TeethAssessment fo...
13 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript Our teet...
14 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating the ...
15 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence© S. Naylor, B...
16 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. ...
17 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. ...
18 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke and hi...
19 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 BonesAssessment fo...
20 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-200...
21 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Constructing...
22 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science7 Designing paper ...
23 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s note...
24 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 ...
25 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript My group...
26 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thin...
27 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP p...
28 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Daily New...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y3_s2

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y3_s2

  • 1. 1 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Luke A (Year 3 securelevel 2)Child profileLuke is working at level 2 in those areas in which he can demonstrate his skills and understanding throughdirect activity or through the spoken word, but his written communication skills vary from day to day and ingeneral they present a significant limiting factor.The evidence1. Investigating where woodlice like to live2. Bird data3. The human life cycle4. Teeth5. Investigating the dissolving of sugar6. Bones7. Designing paper planesQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating where woodlice like to liveAssessment focusesAF3, AF4, AF5ContextChildren were asked to plan and carry out an investigation to find out where woodlice like to live.The teacher talked through ideas on how the class could find out the answer to the question, and thechildren then independently decided what method they would use.They were told they had to provide a picture to illustrate their work and to complete a written exercise withthe following headings: What I need What I will do Results What I found out.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript: What I need woodlouse 4 cups soil (wet) soil (dry) sand (dry) sand (wet) What I will do I am going to get four cups and put one cup in each corner. In one cup will be soil (wet), in the second cup will be soil (dry), in the third cup will be sand (dry) in the fourth cup will be sand (wet).QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript We found out that the woodlice liked the sand best now we have looked at where woodlice like to live now we know woodlice like to live they like dark and wet if I did this next time I would have a dark and wet cup.Teacher’s notesLuke completed the work independently. He could draw a tally chart to collect his data and referred to itwhen writing up his conclusion.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Encouragement of structuring and sequencing of work in various ways, such as here through a list of headings; through use of writing frames; or through use of captioned photographs sequenced in comic strip format, in order to communicate clearly to the reader exact methods used. Further practice at collecting and recording whole number data and presenting it in tables and bar charts.Assessment commentaryThe suggested sequence allows Luke to make a systematic record of his work. He can identify differentconditions to investigate and he makes observations and measurements. He reports these, reaching simpleconclusions from his data and makes suggestions as to how to improve his method if he were to repeat theinvestigation.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Bird dataAssessment focusesAF3, AF4ContextThe children were told that they needed to find out about the numbers of different types of bird that visitedtheir outdoor classroom. The teacher gave them the names and pictures to identify six birds and thechildren discussed different ways to record which birds visited, and how many.A pre-prepared tally chart was then provided and they were asked to think about how to record observationof a bird that was not included on the list. They then completed observations in the outdoor classroom,completing their tally charts and displaying the data on a bar chart.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Further practice at presenting data in bar charts to include clear labelling of axes. Identifying the importance of gathering sufficient evidence in investigative work, with consideration of repeating the survey over a period of time.Assessment commentaryThe simple table matches the bar chart, and identification and recording of birds in addition to thoseoriginally listed is made.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 The human life cycleAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe class discussed changes in living things, considering the changes that they themselves had beenthrough. They provided ideas about how they had grown from being babies; the first things they couldremember; growing up and having children themselves, and about growing old.The life cycle of frogs was provided as an example of a visual representation of changes and to illustraterepetition of events in one generation after another.The children were then asked to draw and label a human life cycle, based on the discussions.The evidenceTeacher’s notesThe labels are ‘pouch’ and ‘baby’.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Finding out information about other life cycles using simple texts and electronic media, illustrating the information graphically with annotations.Assessment commentaryLuke can use the concept of a cycle correctly to generate a model of a biological process, and he can relatethis to his own existence and experience. He presents his ideas in an appropriate format, albeit with only alittle labelling.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 TeethAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4ContextThe class were learning about teeth and how to look after them. Having obtained parental permissions, thechildren carried out an experiment using disclosing tablets. Some children used the tablets before brushingto look at the amount of plaque, while other children brushed their teeth and then used the tablets to seehow much plaque remained.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript Our teeth investigation This is a picture of Miss Mitchell’s teeth. When we came in we are now going to see how much plaque she has on her teeth. I am going to see how much plaque I have on my teeth. I chewed it up and spat it out and looked again to see the plaque was left. I have learned that you need to look after my teeth and not eating sugary things and go to the dentist too.Teacher’s notesLuke independently wrote up what he did and knew it was important to brush his teeth and visit the dentist.He thought it would have been more useful to have before and after photographs of his own teeth andcould say how dentists might use disclosing tablets to see how well he had brushed his teeth.Next steps Consideration of how results could be compared to see if there are any patterns in where plaque tends to build up most. Identifying the cause and effect relationship by researching reasons for the build up of plaque.Assessment commentaryThe evidence shows a link being made between scientific observation and personal health, and includessome technical language. Luke reports on what happens but does not, in his writing, explain how hisobservations help to reveal the importance of brushing teeth or going to the dentist.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating the dissolving of sugarAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4ContextThe children were given a copy of ‘The Daily News’. They read through the article and talked about hownewspapers do not always report the truth.They went through the article in pairs and discussed which parts could be investigated, how this could becarried out, making predictions where appropriate. The children were then provided with appropriateequipment and carried out their investigations.They wrote their own newspaper article to report their findings.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by Millgate House Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by Millgate House Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by Millgate House Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.Transcript Looe Primary School has proven sugar disappears faster with hot water and if you stir it. We put sugar with hot water and … we stirred it.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 18. 18 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke and his partner were given guidance on finding points in the article that could be investigated. Theyinvestigated the effect of temperature (using hot and cold water) and of stirring or not stirring, but as theyworked simultaneously with these two independent variables, it made it hard for them to reach a validconclusion about the effects of either variable.Luke said:‘You don’t need to stir it in hot water.’‘You need to put the same amount of sugar in the hot and cold cup.’(To partner) ‘You stir it and I’ll leave mine alone.’Next steps Further opportunities to carry out investigations and work with control variables to develop ideas about fair testing.Assessment commentaryLuke can make observations to resolve issues raised by the original newspaper article. He can worksuccessfully with a partner. From the article, he is able to develop suggestions about how to find things out,and he can make use of the equipment provided. He is beginning to report on what happens, although heneeds careful support in developing his skills in written reporting.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 19. 19 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 BonesAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe children had looked at a model human skeleton and had compared the human body with the body of asnail, considering the advantages and disadvantages of each.In the following lesson, each child was given a piece of paper and asked to draw a picture of themselvesand the position of their bones. They were also asked to write one sentence explaining what they thoughttheir bones do to help them.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 20. 20 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 21. 21 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Constructing simple physical models of the human skeleton to show the movement of various joints. Sorting and grouping of various living things into those that have skeletons and those that do not.Assessment commentaryLuke is able to create his own simple visual interpretation based on his learning from a physical model. Heshows several key features, including vertebrae, ribcage, skull, and multiple bones in the hands and feet,and indicates one main function of the skeleton.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 22. 22 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science7 Designing paper planesAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4ContextUsing a Primary upd8 resource, ‘Paper Planes’ (www.primaryupd8.org.uk), for initial stimulation, thechildren were told that there was a national paper plane competition to find the plane that stayed up in theair the longest or that flew the furthest distance.The class mind-mapped the things that may affect the flight of the plane, coming up with a number ofvariables such as the type of paper used, size, weight and shape.Each group was given a large sheet of paper to write what they were going to find out, what they neededand what each of them was going to do. The children were provided with the resources to make theirdifferent planes and carried out their flight tests in the school hall. Back in the class they analysed theirresults and discussed their findings.Paper Planes Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 23. 23 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesAn adult helped Luke to transfer images to a computer and together they used Comic Life software, for thefirst time, to make a photo story. Luke selected appropriate text for the speech bubbles. (He looked at thisagain later with the adult, and produced a further draft with improved spelling.) Luke recognised that peoplewho designed aircraft needed to know about science.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 24. 24 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 25. 25 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript My group looked at if the style of the plane made it go further. What you need paper people camera clipboard pencil metre stick Jobs Me and Cleo – styling Sam – flying Eric – measuring Emily and me - camera I thought it would go the furthest because it was well made. It was good because Eric is good at making them. We went into the hall and Sam threw the planes and Eric measured them. I took some photos as well.Next steps Further opportunities to carry out investigations and work with independent variables (as it is not clear here how many different styles of plane were produced). Use of other media formats such as audio or video recording to present investigative work.Assessment commentaryGroup collaboration and acknowledgement of the contributions of others appear here. Luke and his groupselect appropriate variables to investigate. The Comic Life format, together with his paper report, provide anaccount of the activity, although some detail is missing.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 26. 26 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyLuke can draw on observations to answer a question, such as about the preferred habitat of woodlice, andis able to make comparisons.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceThere is evidence of recognition that health practitioners such as dentists make use of science in theirwork, and the importance of science in everyday life.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in sciencePresentation of simple ideas, of observations and of measurements in tables and a simple bar chart formatcan all be seen. Luke is beginning to use some scientific vocabulary and can work in a group, recognisingthe contributions of others (even if not always working in harmony).AF4 Using investigative approachesLuke is able to make suggestions when carrying out investigative work and identifies things to measure andobserve. He can use equipment correctly to carry out the activity, and can use some whole-numbermeasurements.AF5 Working critically with evidenceLuke uses teacher prompts to develop practical approaches, and can report what happened, albeit with aneed to develop sequencing and presentation skills.Overall assessment judgementThe evidence here, which is drawn from two terms’ work, shows that Luke is working at secure level 2. Heis currently more successful at performing practical work than in reporting on it, and needs encouragementto generate organised explanations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 27. 27 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 2 and 3 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the applications AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically and implications of science collaborating in science approaches with evidence L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 3 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Identify differences, similarities or  Explain the purposes of a variety of  Present simple scientific data in more  Identify one or more control variables in  Identify straightforward changes related to simple scientific scientific or technological developments than one way, including tables and investigations from those provided patterns in observations or in ideas, processes or phenomena bar charts data presented in various  Link applications to specific characteristics  Select equipment or information sources formats, including tables, pie  Respond to ideas given to them to or properties  Use scientific forms of language when from those provided to address a and bar charts answer questions or suggest communicating simple scientific ideas, question or idea under investigation  Identify aspects of our lives, or of the work solutions to problems processes or phenomena  Describe what they have found that people do, which are based on scientific  Make some accurate observations or out in experiments or  Represent things in the real world ideas  Identify simple advantages of working whole number measurements relevant investigations, linking cause using simple physical models together on experiments or to questions or ideas under investigation and effect investigations  Use straightforward scientific  Recognise obvious risks when  Suggest improvements to their evidence to answer questions, or to prompted working methods support their findings   L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 2 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Draw on their observations and  Express personal feelings or opinions about  Present their ideas and evidence in  Make some suggestions about how to  Say what happened in their ideas to offer answers to questions scientific or technological phenomena appropriate ways find things out or how to collect data to experiment or investigation answer a question or idea they are  Make comparisons between basic  Describe, in familiar contexts, how science  Respond to prompts by using simple  Say whether what happened investigating features or components of objects, helps people do things texts and electronic media to find was what they expected, living things or events information  Identify things to measure or observe acknowledging any  Identify people who use science to help that are relevant to the question or idea unexpected outcomes  Sort and group objects, living things others  Use simple scientific vocabulary to they are investigating or events on the basis of what they describe their ideas and observations  Respond to prompts to suggest  Identify scientific or technological have observed  Correctly use equipment provided to different ways they could have phenomena and say whether or not they are  Work together on an experiment or make observations and measurements done things  Respond to suggestions to identify helpful investigation and recognise some evidence (in the form of contributions made by others  Make measurements, using standard or information, observations or non-standard units as appropriate measurements) needed to answer a question   BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 2 Secure 2  High 2 Low 3 Secure 3 High 3 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 28. 28 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Daily News’ worksheets © S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by MillgateHouse Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-06 © Crown copyright 2009