1 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating how to...
3 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
4 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Comparison of ...
5 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 BonesAssessment focu...
6 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
7 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Work with phys...
8 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating whethe...
9 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
10 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 ...
11 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 ...
12 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 ...
13 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 ...
14 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesAt the end ...
15 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Use of sprea...
16 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Explaining friction...
17 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceSee the video ...
18 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Forces and air res...
19 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-200...
20 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Investigatin...
21 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Habitats and adapt...
22 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-200...
23 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 ...
24 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesChristopher...
25 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment commentaryIn hi...
26 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thin...
27 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP pr...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y4_l4

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y4_l4

  • 1. 1 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Christopher (Year 4 lowlevel 4)Child profileChristopher is enthusiastic and articulate, and making good progress into level 4.The evidence1. Investigating how to keep an ice lolly cool2. Bones3. Investigating whether the person with the longest arms has the biggest head4. Explaining friction5. Forces and air resistance6. Habitats and adaptationsQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating how to keep an ice lolly coolAssessment focusesAF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children were working on changes to materials when heated and cooled. They had measuredtemperatures in the classroom using the Celsius scale, and had looked at melting and freezing. This hadled to some discussion of how to keep warm in cold weather, and the children discussed different types ofclothes and space blankets.They were set the challenge of investigating how to keep ice lollies solid for as long as possible. Thechildren mentioned fridges and freezers, and what the differences were between ‘keeping cold’ and‘keeping warm’.Working in groups of three, the children were provided with ‘ice lollies’ (ice cubes on sticks) and a range ofappropriate equipment and insulating materials. They worked in pairs.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Comparison of work from some different groups, leading to discussion of the benefit of quantitative work (such as measuring actual time to melt).Assessment commentaryChristopher can choose his own format for presenting data. He recognises the need for a fair test andidentifies the variables to be kept constant, and selects equipment from a range available. He shows thathe can draw an appropriate straightforward conclusion from data, and he uses a cause–effect associationwhen describing what he has found out.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 BonesAssessment focusesAF1, AF3ContextDuring the first lesson of a topic about moving and growing, the class were asked to complete the first twocolumns of their KWL grid (see pupil evidence). In the first column they wrote down everything they alreadyknew about this topic. In the middle column they were asked to write scientific questions for which theywanted to find answers. At the end of the topic, in the last lesson, they completed the third column to showtheir new learning.In the meantime, during literacy and science lessons based on information texts, the children were asked toresearch and select information for posters on the topic of moving and growing. They were told that theposters should be informative and understandable for other children of their age. They had an informationleaflet on the human body and they used the internet.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Work with physical models of bones and muscles, emphasising the understanding of mechanisms rather than simpler reporting of information. Information research on breaking bones and how the medical profession supports repair or replacement.Assessment commentaryThrough the use of clear and concise diagrams and text boxes, Christopher chooses appropriate ways tocommunicate scientific ideas. These include descriptions of the structure of the skeleton, examples of jointtypes and their roles. Christopher uses scientific terminology such as cartilage, cranium, joints, femur, andpelvis. In the KWL grid he poses interesting questions to research. He refers back to his questions to showthe increase in his knowledge. He selects appropriate information for the task.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating whether the person with the longest arms has the biggest headAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextDuring work on moving and growing, the teacher presented children with a scenario in which problemswere occurring regarding the school’s new PE kits. The teacher presented the children with letters writtenby parents complaining that the sweatshirts fitted perfectly but the hat was too tight and vice versa. Theywere asked to describe how they could collect information that would allow them to find out if there was acorrelation between arm length and head size. They were asked to work together to share ideas, and thencarry out this investigation.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesAt the end of the lesson Christopher was able to tell the class: how his investigation answered the original question whether or not the results matched his predictions.Christopher could also say that the measurements were more accurate when someone else held the tapemeasure and recognised that the age labels are not always the best way of choosing clothes that will fit.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Use of spreadsheets to work with data sets, producing accurate scatter and line graphs, with appropriate scales, that can be changed as measurements are taken. Discussion of the idea that some scientific investigations are not fair tests when there are variables (such as genetics, diet, exact age) that cannot be controlled.Assessment commentaryChristopher recognises the implications for clothing manufacturers when they are producing packs ofclothing for specific age ranges. He can present data clearly in more than one way – table, bar chart andscatter graph – and uses these to identify a general pattern: ‘Stefan had the longest arm and the biggesthead’. He identifies the advantages of working with a partner. He shows that he recognises the importanceof using the tape measure correctly. Christopher identifies a straightforward pattern in making a summarystatement of his investigation findings.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Explaining frictionAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe teacher introduced the topic of forces and friction and gave the children a couple of minutesto share ideas with a partner. Each couple then fed back to the whole class. Christopher wasasked to repeat his explanations to camera.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceSee the video clip of Christopher talking about friction, available on the National Strategies webarea (go to www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standardsfiles or search for ‘APP science standards file: Christopher’).Teacher’s notesChristopher went into great detail about his understanding of friction. He explained that friction was a forcethat happened when two surfaces rubbed together. He gave the example of a stone skimming across apond, and the more times it touched the surface of the water, the more it slowed down. He then went on totalk about air resistance and explained to the group that when a parachutist jumps out of a plane the gravitypulls him down to Earth, but the air pushes up against the parachute and slows it down.Next steps Consideration of how scientists and designers have worked together to make useable, safe parachutes.Assessment commentaryChristopher is able to explain his understanding of friction using scientific ideas and modelling. He relatesthese ideas to scenarios in the world around him such as skimming stones and using a parachute. Heexpresses himself clearly using appropriate scientific vocabulary to communicate his knowledge andunderstanding of the subject.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 18. 18 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Forces and air resistanceAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextDuring the work on forces and friction the class looked at the effect of air resistance on particular objects.They were asked to produce diagrams to show the direction and strength of air resistance on a cyclist andparachutist. They were asked to write a sentence to explain the effect of air resistance in each scenario.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 19. 19 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 20. 20 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Investigating air resistance and how it might be decreased or increased depending on need (as in the cases of a cyclist and a parachutist). Applying air resistance ideas within the animal and plant kingdoms (such as a diving kestrel and a dispersing dandelion seed).Assessment commentaryChristopher uses simple models to describe phenomena. His diagrams include arrows that show both thedirection and the size of the force. He can relate his understanding of scientific concepts to real lifeexperiences and can explain why air resistance can be helpful or not. He uses appropriate scientific formsof language to communicate his ideas.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 21. 21 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Habitats and adaptationsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe children were starting a unit of work based on adaptation of living things to different environments.Christopher created a series of mind maps to identify specific animals that could be found in four habitats.Subsequent work developed an understanding of specific adaptations that made some of the animalssuitable to their habitat.The class then undertook a D&T task to design and make a creature adapted to an imaginary extremehabitat. Christopher’s planning sheet includes specific adaptations for an ‘oven louse’.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 22. 22 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 23. 23 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 24. 24 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesChristopher said why he chose the animals for each of the mind maps and described specificcharacteristics that allowed the animal to survive in the given habitat. When questioned he could say whyan animal could not survive in one of the other habitats.For the oven louse, Christopher described why it was important to have eggs in order to make sure thatthere are future generations of the creature.Next steps Consideration of how adaptations have developed over extremely long periods of time, looking at times in history when conditions have changed and the effect that this had on various animals and plants.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 25. 25 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment commentaryIn his explanation of the mind maps, Christopher shows that he can identify similarities and differencesrelating to simple scientific ideas. Through his explanation of the adaptations of the oven louse, he is ableto show the impact of natural scientific developments and links specific characteristics to their purpose. Heuses appropriate scientific forms of expression to communicate ideas.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 26. 26 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyChristopher uses scientific ideas and simple models to describe how things happen. He usesstraightforward scientific evidence to answer questions and support findings, and can make sensiblecontrasts when considering science.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceChristopher can identify and explain implications of scientific ideas on aspects of our lives. He coulddiscuss the effects of textures and different surfaces on the amount of friction that they created. Throughhis discussion of the uses of air resistance, Christopher identifies some aspects of our lives based onscientific ideas. When making links between habitats and environments Christopher is able to explain thepurposes of some scientific developments in the natural world.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceChristopher demonstrates consistent use of appropriate scientific language and has presented data in awide range of forms that include the use of a table, bar graph, scatter graph, posters and labelled diagramsas well as more conventional written work. Christopher works well collaboratively.AF4 Using investigative approachesChristopher is able to carry out a fair test and uses equipment appropriately and accurately. Wheninvestigating the correlation between arm length and head circumference Christopher shows he is able tomake accurate measurements. In other investigations he is able to control variables.AF5 Working critically with evidenceChristopher is able to draw straightforward conclusions from the data presented in various forms. He hasused a scatter graph to compare two sets of numerical data, identifying simple patterns. Furtheropportunities need to be provided for him to demonstrate how he can suggest improvements to his working.Overall assessment judgementThe evidence here, which is drawn from two terms’ work, demonstrates that Christopher is able to showsome elements of a secure level 4, especially in AF3, and is certainly working at high level 3 across theother assessment focuses. His overall profile suggests that he is working at a low level 4.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 27. 27 of 27 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 3 and 4 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence science L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 4 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use scientific ideas when describing  Describe some simple positive  Select appropriate ways of  Decide when it is appropriate to carry  Identify patterns in data presented simple processes or phenomena and negative consequences of presenting scientific data out fair tests in investigations in various formats, including line  Use simple models to describe scientific and technological  Use appropriate scientific forms of  Select appropriate equipment or graphs scientific ideas developments language to communicate information sources to address  Draw straightforward conclusions  Identify scientific evidence that is  Recognise applications of specific scientific ideas, processes or specific questions or ideas under from data presented in various being used to support or refute scientific ideas phenomena investigation formats ideas or arguments  Identify aspects of science used  Use scientific and mathematical  Make sets of observations or  Identify scientific evidence they within particular jobs or roles conventions when communicating measurements, identifying the ranges have used in drawing conclusions information or ideas and intervals used  Suggest improvements to their  Identify possible risks to themselves working methods, giving reasons and others    L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 3 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Identify differences, similarities or  Explain the purposes of a variety  Present simple scientific data in  Identify one or more control variables  Identify straightforward patterns in changes related to simple scientific of scientific or technological more than one way, including in investigations from those provided observations or in data presented ideas, processes or phenomena developments tables and bar charts  Select equipment or information in various formats, including  Respond to ideas given to them to  Link applications to specific  Use scientific forms of language sources from those provided to tables, pie and bar charts answer questions or suggest characteristics or properties when communicating simple address a question or idea under  Describe what they have found out solutions to problems  Identify aspects of our lives, or of scientific ideas, processes or investigation in experiments or investigations,  Represent things in the real world the work that people do, which are phenomena  Make some accurate observations or linking cause and effect using simple physical models based on scientific ideas  Identify simple advantages of whole number measurements  Suggest improvements to their  Use straightforward scientific working together on experiments relevant to questions or ideas under working methods evidence to answer questions, or to or investigations investigation support their findings  Recognise obvious risks when prompted  BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 3 Secure 3  High 3 Low 4  Secure 4 High 4 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-09 © Crown copyright 2009