1 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Exploring boiling an...
3 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence© S. Naylor, B. ...
4 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke was very...
5 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Investigating the ef...
6 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
7 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesAfter watchin...
8 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion of ...
9 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating the ef...
10 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhile the c...
11 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 How to get the air...
12 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke began ...
13 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Summer rainAssessm...
14 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTaken from Primary Upd8 ww...
15 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidencea. Interpretin...
16 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke did no...
17 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceb. Representing the water ...
18 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thin...
19 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP pr...
20 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Daily New...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y5_s3

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      Business      
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Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y5_s3

  • 1. 1 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Luke B (Year 5 securelevel 3)Child profileLuke enjoys practical work and, up to the limits of his ability, quantitative work. He often takes cues fromthose around him when developing methods or reaching conclusions that require thoughtful analysis.The evidence1. Exploring boiling and evaporation2. Investigating the effect of air flow on evaporation3. Investigating the effect of location on the saltiness of water4. How to get the air out of a test tube5. Summer rain a. Interpreting rainfall data b. Representing the water cycleQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Exploring boiling and evaporationAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4ContextThe children had previously explored the properties of solids, liquids and gases, with some brief discussionof change of state. The teacher used a transparent kettle and a portable stove with a frying pan todemonstrate what happens when water is heated. Before the demonstrations, the hazards were discussedand the children identified appropriate control measures to minimise the risk. Through discussion, thereversible nature of the change of state was also considered.The children then used the Daily News writing frame to explain what happens to water when a sample isheated.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence© S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by Millgate House Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke was very vocal during the discussion of what was happening in the boiling and evaporationdemonstrations. It was Luke who first made reference to evaporation, without prompting. He understoodthat the water changed state and did not cease to exist, but had some difficulty in verbalising this.During the demonstrations, Luke showed that he understood that it was important to remain a safe distancefrom the hot materials.Next steps Investigating the factors that affect the rate of evaporation of water. Opportunities to strengthen Luke’s understanding of scientific terms, such as vapour and gas.Assessment commentaryLuke represents real-world changes in a simple flow-chart model. He uses scientific language whencommunicating his ideas and identifies hazards to himself and others. When prompted Luke suggestssome effective control measures and links cause and effect by commenting that the state of change wasdue to heating.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Investigating the effect of air flow on evaporationAssessment focusesAF3, AF4, AF5ContextTemplates for a set of three investigations on evaporation were provided. The independent variables forthese investigations were temperature, surface area and air flow. The children were allowed to choose oneof these, and the class compared the results afterwards.Luke’s group decided to investigate the effect of air flow. The teacher suggested some locations that mayhave different air flows, and the group made their plans and gathered data.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesAfter watching other children, Luke’s group changed their minds about how they would carry out theinvestigation. It is because of this original plan that he writes about measuring the volume of water to besqueezed out of the paper towels (the dependent variable). During discussion, Luke’s group said that thepaper towel with the faster airflow dried much quicker.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion of the difficulty in controlling certain variables, with the idea that changing the location potentially changes more than just the air flow. Consideration of improvements to working methods to provide quantitative measurement of air flow, such as using a fan on different settings.Assessment commentaryLuke did not produce a table but he shows that he can present data using a simple bar chart. He makesreliable and relevant observations. He identifies straightforward patterns, and gives a simple description ofwhat happened, with a brief spoken group conclusion.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating the effect of location on the saltiness of waterAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe class had learned about evaporation as a way of purifying water.They collected samples of water from the sea and from three locations on the river, including tidal and non-tidal locations. They returned to the classroom and, in groups, chose equipment to evaporate the water.They later examined their samples and Luke’s group took photographs.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhile the class collected their samples of water they were asked to predict which water might contain thegreatest amount of salt and why. Luke could give a reason for his prediction.Next steps Emphasis on clarity of data presentation, since Luke’s table here is not clearly labelled. Research on the large-scale evaporation of saline to produce either salt or pure water supplies.Assessment commentaryLuke records his data in a simple table. He links cause and effect to demonstrate the reasoning behind hisprediction.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 How to get the air out of a test tubeAssessment focusesAF1, AF4, AF5ContextHaving looked at ideas about solids, liquids and gases, one group of children was set the challenge ofgetting the air out of a test tube. Working individually they each began with their own ideas, but also learnedthrough collaboration.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke began with ideas of forcing the air out by blowing, but quickly realised that this would not work andthought of displacing the air with wooden cubes. By watching another child he learned that water coulddisplace all of the air.Next steps Introduction to simple particle ideas to help explain some of the simple properties of solids, liquids and gases.Assessment commentaryLuke can respond to ideas provided, to solve a problem. He can select materials and make appropriateobservations. He amends his procedure in the light of learning and describes what he has found out, withexplanation.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Summer rainAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4ContextThe children had explored the importance of air movements and changes of state to the work of weatherforecasters, and had discussed the difference between forecasting for a few days ahead and looking forpatterns of long-term climate change.The whole class discussed the data provided by an upd8 resource, ‘What makes summer more rainy?’(www.primaryupd8.org.uk) and the environmental impact that high rainfall may have, particularly in thesummer.a. Interpreting rainfall dataThe children used the data from the resource to make bar charts and to write their own conclusions.b. Representing the water cycleThey then looked at the water cycle shown on the resource, searched for similar images on the internet,and produced their own versions.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTaken from Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidencea. Interpreting rainfall dataQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesLuke did not understand the statement that ‘colder air can’t hold water, so it falls out as rain’. He wasconfident that the warmer weather affected evaporation although he needed to be prompted by anotherchild to remember previous investigations when they had discussed the statement that ‘wind makes waterevaporate quicker’.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceb. Representing the water cycleTeacher’s notesLuke used more than one source to produce the diagram, and showed he has a clear understanding of thewater cycle during discussions.Luke also talked about how data is useful in predicting weather patterns and asked some interestingquestions about the research behind the daily weather forecasts.Next steps Opportunity to work with more primary data from his own investigations and from secondary sources such as upd8, in order to provide interpretations of the meaning of patterns in data.Assessment commentaryLuke identifies straightforward patterns from the data displayed on the bar chart that he constructs from thetable data. Although Luke has not understood all the implications of the data given, he is beginning to see alink between science and how it can help us. In his representation of the water cycle, he identifiesprocesses of change and uses a cyclic model. He understands and uses scientific vocabulary appropriateto his explanations of the water cycle and weather patterns.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 18. 18 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyLuke uses pictorial representations, which are simple models, to help him to understand physicalprocesses. He identifies changes, and, in discussion, uses given scientific ideas to consider problems.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceLuke is able to identify some aspects of people’s lives and the work they do which are based on scientificideas. More evidence is needed to make any further judgement of progress within this assessment focus.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceLuke is able to present simple scientific data in more than one way, including using tables and bar charts,which are usually labelled, if not always with full clarity. He uses scientific forms of language whencommunicating simple ideas and processes.AF4 Using investigative approachesLuke identifies control variables and selects equipment from that provided to solve problems. He is able tomake reliable observations and whole-number measurements. He recognises risks to himself and othersindependently.AF5 Working critically with evidenceLuke identifies straightforward patterns in observations and data, and can describe in simple terms what hehas found out with some identification of cause and effect.Overall assessment judgementAlthough some further opportunities are required for Luke to show evidence of performance within AF2, heis working at secure level 3 with a consistent profile across the other assessment focuses. This sample ofevidence draws mainly from attainment target 3 during one term. Over the course of the rest of the yearLuke should encounter further opportunities to demonstrate his skills and understanding within other areasof science. This would provide a greater range of evidence to make a judgement against.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 19. 19 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 3 and 4 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence science L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 4 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use scientific ideas when describing  Describe some simple positive  Select appropriate ways of  Decide when it is appropriate to carry  Identify patterns in data presented simple processes or phenomena and negative consequences of presenting scientific data out fair tests in investigations in various formats, including line  Use simple models to describe scientific and technological  Use appropriate scientific forms of  Select appropriate equipment or graphs scientific ideas developments language to communicate information sources to address  Draw straightforward conclusions  Identify scientific evidence that is  Recognise applications of specific scientific ideas, processes or specific questions or ideas under from data presented in various being used to support or refute scientific ideas phenomena investigation formats ideas or arguments  Identify aspects of science used  Use scientific and mathematical  Make sets of observations or  Identify scientific evidence they within particular jobs or roles conventions when communicating measurements, identifying the ranges have used in drawing conclusions information or ideas and intervals used  Suggest improvements to their  Identify possible risks to themselves working methods, giving reasons and others L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 3 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Identify differences, similarities or  Explain the purposes of a variety  Present simple scientific data in  Identify one or more control variables  Identify straightforward patterns in changes related to simple scientific of scientific or technological more than one way, including in investigations from those provided observations or in data presented ideas, processes or phenomena developments tables and bar charts  Select equipment or information in various formats, including  Respond to ideas given to them to  Link applications to specific  Use scientific forms of language sources from those provided to tables, pie and bar charts answer questions or suggest characteristics or properties when communicating simple address a question or idea under  Describe what they have found out solutions to problems  Identify aspects of our lives, or of scientific ideas, processes or investigation in experiments or investigations,  Represent things in the real world the work that people do, which are phenomena  Make some accurate observations or linking cause and effect using simple physical models based on scientific ideas  Identify simple advantages of whole number measurements  Suggest improvements to their  Use straightforward scientific working together on experiments relevant to questions or ideas under working methods evidence to answer questions, or to or investigations investigation support their findings  Recognise obvious risks when prompted     BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 3 Secure 3  High 3 Low 4 Secure 4 High 4 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 20. 20 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Daily News’ worksheets © S. Naylor, B. Keogh, A. Goldsworthy 2004. Published by MillgateHouse Education Ltd, www.millgatehouse.co.uk. Used with kind permission.Primary Upd8, www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kindpermission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-07 © Crown copyright 2009