1 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Coastal erosionAsses...
3 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 ...
4 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 ...
5 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 ...
6 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesDuring discus...
7 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Cola can scienceAsse...
8 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
9 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesHolly had ple...
10 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating para...
11 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 ...
12 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion o...
13 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Designing a bath m...
14 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen asked ...
15 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Electricity explan...
16 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-200...
17 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen asked,...
18 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Fair-testing dataA...
19 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s note...
20 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Focused inve...
21 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 ...
22 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP pr...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y6_h4

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y6_h4

  • 1. 1 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Holly (Year 6 high level 4)Child profileHolly is a thoughtful child and has good communication skills, working at level 5 in her literacy work. Herprogress in science shows her to be working at high level 4.The evidence1. Coastal erosion2. Cola can science3. Investigating parachutes4. Designing a bath mat5. Electricity explanations6. Fair-testing dataQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Coastal erosionAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextAfter a residential trip during which the children learned about coastal erosion, they were challenged toraise further questions that they could investigate scientifically. Which rocks will provide the best protection from coastal erosion? How can we protect the house on the cliff? What can we do to prevent landslips?They discussed these, as shown here in a video, and built a model, in groups. They then each wrote areport on protection of the coastline, and this evidence shows extracts from that.The evidenceSee the video clip of Holly’s class talking about coaastal erosion, available on the NationalStrategies web area (go to www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse theprimary standards files or search for ‘APP science standards file: Holly’).QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesDuring discussion, Holly was able to say how the people working to prevent coastal erosion needed tounderstand about waves and forces when they were designing protective structures.Next steps Work on consideration of different viewpoints, including those of local residents who want to be protected and of representatives of the wider community who claim that the costs are unjustified given the expectation of rising sea levels. Exploration of the use of scientific modelling to predict the outcomes from possible scenarios.Assessment commentaryThe work here shows thoroughness and thoughtfulness. Holly uses a simple physical model tocommunicate ideas, and recognises specific applications. She uses appropriate vocabulary in hercommunication about the process of coastal erosion and preventative measures.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Cola can scienceAssessment focusesAF2, AF3ContextThis was a stimulus activity introducing work on states of matter and changes of state. It began with somereal cola cans, straight from the fridge, which the children passed around. They were told to be asobservant as possible.They were then each provided with a photograph of a cola can and asked to annotate this to showwhatever science they could possibly associate with it.The children were challenged to collect condensation and to see if they could think of: a safe way to find out if it was water where it came from.During this, one group, including Holly, had an impromptu conversation about fridges and freezers, whichthe teacher joined.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesHolly had plenty of ideas from her observations, and she and her partner collected enough water toexamine closely, but couldn’t say how they could be sure that it was water.The group’s discussion of fridges and freezers raised many questions about heating and cooling. Thechildren knew that they have motors and these work by electricity. Holly knew that old appliances have tobe specially disposed of because they harm the atmosphere, although she was not able to say how, exceptthat ‘they have a gas inside them.’Next steps Work on changes of state of water, including open-ended investigations on freezing and evaporation.Assessment commentaryHolly relates scientific ideas to an everyday context, and touches on a negative consequence oftechnology. She makes use of some appropriate scientific terminology.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating parachutesAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children were shown a video of a parachute drop.They were asked to investigate how the size of the area of the parachute affects the speed that it will fall.They were told that they had to work independently to produce their parachutes, make and record enoughmeasurements to try to find an answer to the question, and say whether they thought their results answeredthe question as fully as possible.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion of justified precision in practical measurement. Consideration of conventional representation of quantitative data in line graphs.Assessment commentaryHolly uses some abstract representation in her diagram, and recognises how scientific ideas are applied toparachuting. She sensibly constructs a line graph to represent the data, although the graph does notrepresent the data in the conventional way. She identifies variables to investigate and makes sets ofmeasurements but does not explain them fully, and does not use the mean values to plot her graph. Sheidentifies patterns in data and uses them to reach a valid conclusion.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Designing a bath matAssessment focusesAF1, AF2ContextFollowing work on friction, and earlier work on materials and properties, the children were asked to applywhat they knew to design a non-slip, absorbent bath mat for a family.For continuation in a later lesson, the children looked at consumer reports and produced individual plans forpractical comparisons of friction provided by different mats when wet and dry, involving measurement offorces. They later worked with partners, deciding together which method they would actually follow.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen asked about what she meant by the statement that the mat was made of rubber because ‘it producesheat’ she explained that, ‘it makes your feet feel warm’. The class had not done specific work on energyand energy sources, so her mistake is understandable.In planning her practical to compare mats, Holly reported that she intended to use a forcemeter to drag aslipper along the mats, starting from a standstill in each case and moving a set distance. She planned torepeat this on wet and dry mats, using the same amount of water, spread evenly, for each wet mat.Next steps Discussion with partner and collaborative decision making on methods to be used, followed by the investigation of friction on different wet and dry mats. Investigation of absorbency of different proposed materials.Assessment commentaryHolly uses scientific ideas in her descriptions, and recognises the application of the idea of friction. For herplanned investigation she identifies variables, makes relevant decisions about fair testing, and choosesappropriate equipment.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Electricity explanationsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF5ContextAs part of a sequence of work on electricity, Holly, working alone, set up some circuits, using circuitdiagrams provided. She photographed them, adding annotations to explain why they did or did not work.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen asked, Holly was able to say that, in the last circuit, she had made a minor mistake, and meant toshow that the bulb would become brighter and eventually break.Next steps Work on benefits and drawbacks of electrical technologies, and exploration of appropriate technologies for use in remote locations in the world. Draw more accurate circuit diagrams to ensure there are no breaks in the circuit (either side of the battery).Assessment commentaryHolly interprets circuit diagrams, which are pictorial models that make use of established conventions. Thepoints she makes are conceptually valid, using abstract ideas to explain observations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 18. 18 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Fair-testing dataAssessment FocusesAF3, AF4 and AF5ContextAs a review of the principles of fair testing, the children carried out a series of simple dissolvinginvestigations. They worked individually and chose questions to answer from the following list. Templateswere provided in all cases. Does stirring speed up dissolving? Does the amount of sugar make a difference to how fast it dissolves? Does water temperature affect speed of dissolving? Does speed of stirring affect how fast it dissolves? Does the size of a sugar granule affect the speed of dissolving?For each question selected, children recorded which factors would have to be kept the same (see yellowhorizontal bars in the tables). They then had to carry out a fair test and write brief conclusions.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 19. 19 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesIt was Holly’s decision to write her conclusions between the tables. She also explained that she couldextend and improve her investigations by trying different temperatures, different speeds of stirring and arange of different sizes of sugar granules.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 20. 20 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Focused investigation on one dependent variable with due consideration of an appropriate range and intervals for the independent variable. Identification of possible risks in experimental and investigative work.Assessment commentaryThe work shows application of fair testing, although the prescribed format provides little opportunity forHolly to show her own thinking on this. She does, however, calculate averages correctly and uses ameaningful level of precision. She uses a concise format to provide conclusions.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 21. 21 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyThe evidence here shows stronger progress than in other assessment focuses. Holly shows an ability tomake use of abstract ideas and models in her work on circuits and the parachute investigation.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceThe evidence suggests Holly addresses all of the criteria at level 4, and further opportunities should allowher to demonstrate performance at level 5.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceHolly makes confident use of circuit diagrams and uses appropriate forms of language through her work.Her presentation of scientific data is developing well, although she would benefit from more opportunity torefine these skills.AF4 Using investigative approachesHolly shows established confidence in fair testing, and is seen to be carrying out investigations withguidance. With greater freedom she should soon be able to make progress at level 5.AF5 Working critically with evidenceThere is clear evidence of identification of patterns and development of straightforward conclusions. Hollyneeds opportunities to evaluate her working methods and to work with different pieces of evidence.Overall assessment judgementHolly succeeds across all assessment focuses at level 4, and fulfils some criteria at level 5. Herwork takes her to a high level 4 judgement, but not yet as far as level 5 overall. This evidence isdrawn from two terms. Over the rest of the year Holly should be provided with further opportunities todemonstrate her skills and understanding within other areas of science, particularly attainment target 2.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 22. 22 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 4 and 5 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence science L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 5 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use abstract ideas or models or  Describe different viewpoints a range of  Distinguish between opinion and  Recognise significant variables  Interpret data in a variety of more than one step when people may have about scientific or scientific evidence in contexts related to in investigations, selecting the formats, recognising obvious describing processes or technological developments science, and use evidence rather than most suitable to investigate inconsistencies phenomena  Indicate how scientific or technological opinion to support or challenge  Explain why particular pieces of  Provide straightforward  Explain processes or developments may affect different scientific arguments equipment or information explanations for differences in phenomena, suggest solutions to groups of people in different ways  Decide on the most appropriate formats sources are appropriate for the repeated observations or problems or answer questions by  Identify ethical or moral issues linked to to present sets of scientific data, such questions or ideas under measurements drawing on abstract ideas or scientific or technological developments as using line graphs for continuous investigation  Draw valid conclusions that models variables  Repeat sets of observations or utilise more than one piece of  Link applications of science or  Recognise scientific questions technology to their underpinning  Use appropriate scientific and measurements where supporting evidence, including that do not yet have definitive scientific ideas mathematical conventions and appropriate, selecting suitable numerical data and line graphs answers terminology to communicate abstract ranges and intervals  Evaluate the effectiveness of  Identify the use of evidence and ideas  Make, and act on, suggestions their working methods, making creative thinking by scientists in  Suggest how collaborative approaches to control obvious risks to practical suggestions for the development of scientific to specific experiments or investigations themselves and others improving them ideas may improve the evidence collected   L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 4 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use scientific ideas when  Describe some simple positive and  Select appropriate ways of presenting  Decide when it is appropriate to  Identify patterns in data describing simple processes or negative consequences of scientific and scientific data carry out fair tests in presented in various formats, phenomena technological developments  Use appropriate scientific forms of investigations including line graphs  Use simple models to describe  Recognise applications of specific language to communicate scientific  Select appropriate equipment or  Draw straightforward scientific ideas scientific ideas ideas, processes or phenomena information sources to address conclusions from data  Identify scientific evidence that is  Identify aspects of science used within  Use scientific and mathematical specific questions or ideas presented in various formats being used to support or refute particular jobs or roles conventions when communicating under investigation  Identify scientific evidence they ideas or arguments information or ideas  Make sets of observations or have used in drawing measurements, identifying the conclusions ranges and intervals used  Suggest improvements to their  Identify possible risks to working methods, giving themselves and others reasons   BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 4 Secure 4  High 4  Low 5 Secure 5 High 5 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-10 © Crown copyright 2009