1 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standard...
2 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating light-...
3 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesT...
4 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Crisps and healthy e...
5 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
6 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran gave f...
7 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 FilteringAssessment ...
8 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009P...
9 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran and hi...
10 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Investigating air ...
11 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceWe found that the spinner ...
12 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating fric...
13 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-200...
14 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran work...
15 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Points of viewAsse...
16 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 ...
17 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP pr...
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Pri app sci_std_file_y6_l5

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pri app sci_std_file_y6_l5

  • 1. 1 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Ciaran (Year 6 low level 5)Child profileCiaran is confident in practical work, and is developing his scientific thinking from a sound base in level 4 toa real impact on the more sophisticated criteria at level 5, across all assessment focuses.The evidence1. Investigating light-reflecting surfaces2. Crisps and healthy eating3. Filtering4. Investigating air resistance5. Investigating friction6. Points of viewQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2. 2 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating light-reflecting surfacesAssessment focusesAF4, AF5ContextThe class had discussed reflective clothing, and were given the following scenario: It was time for the dolls’big night out. Children were asked to help the dolls decide which outfit would help them to be seen mostclearly by car drivers as they walked along the dark streets of Dollsville.Children worked in pairs to investigate a selection of materials, in order to arrange them in their order ofreflectivity. This was an open-ended exercise, with no guidance given on the method to be used.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3. 3 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesThere were significant differences in how children gauged how much light was reflected. Some simply made a direct judgement of the amount of brightness of light reflected. Some used magnifying glasses (though usually without a clear purpose). Some pairs, including Ciaran and his partner, used torches.Ciaran and his partner also devised a method using a white screen to judge secondary reflection. Whenasked why, they said:Partner: It’s easier to tell which is brightest.Ciaran: The light from the screen is not so bright, and it’s easier to tell not-bright light from hardly any lightat all.They made careful judgements and with several repetitions of each type of material, until they wereconfident they had the correct order.When asked what they were doing to ensure fair testing, they pointed out that they used a ruler to makesure that distances from torch to reflector and reflector to screen were always the same.The two worked well together, both providing ideas and recognising each other’s contributions.Next steps Encouragement of evaluation of the effectiveness of working methods while work is in progress, and developing their ideas accordingly. Use of light sensors and data loggers to provide more reliable data that can be analysed quantitatively.Assessment commentaryCiaran can recognise and talk about applications of science and the ideas that underpin them. He is able todecide when it is appropriate to carry out a fair test and can explain why particular methods and equipmentare appropriate, repeating observations in order to be satisfied with difficult judgements. He generates aconclusion that is matched to the evidence.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 4. 4 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Crisps and healthy eatingAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF5ContextAs part of work on healthy eating, children had previously added iodine solution to various foods, includingcrisps, and had been taught that the foods that turned black contained carbohydrates and were energy-providing foods.They were taught about the nutritional information on food packaging, including ‘traffic light’ systems andalternative approaches, and had made judgements about whether food manufacturers were concealinginformation.They looked, in particular, at different types of crisps, and recorded how much fat and salt each containedin order to investigate which are the healthiest. They chose to present results either as bar charts or intables.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 5. 5 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6. 6 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran gave fat and salt quantities in grams rather than in grams per specified mass of crisps. When thiswas pointed out to him he said that the amounts were all ‘per packet’, and that packets all had the same‘weight’ of crisps.He said it was difficult to say which crisps were the healthiest as those with the least amount of fat (Skips)did not have the least amount of salt, and those with least amount of salt (Wotsits) did not have the leastamount of fat.Next steps Consideration of other investigations where the question being asked may not provide definitive answers.Assessment commentaryCiaran relates the science, including the secondary data that he has collected, to health issues. Hechooses appropriate presentation of data and draws a valid conclusion, emphasising uncertainty from thetwo sets of data.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7. 7 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 FilteringAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4ContextAfter discussion about the work of Northumbria Water in getting water from the Kielder Reservoir to ourhomes, pairs of children were each given a tablespoon of mud from the school field and they mixed thiswith 200 ml of water. They were asked to get the muddy water as close to ‘drinkable’ as possible, withoutusing any further water.A wide selection of materials was available. This included: sieves several kinds of fabric high and low quality filter paper funnels beakers buckets.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8. 8 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9. 9 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran and his partner used the equipment in a logical sequence, starting with coarse filtering and finishingwith the high quality filter paper, and cleaned the water significantly. He explained that he and his partneragreed on a filtration approach and decided together the order in which they would use the various filters.Next steps Work on water-borne diseases, including information research in which children act as ‘specialists’ on different infections, linking with work in geography and Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHEE).Assessment summaryCiaran uses abstract ideas about particles when describing water purification, linking technologicalapplications to underpinning science. He uses appropriate forms of scientific language and is able to justifythe use of particular items of equipment in their appropriate order.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10. 10 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Investigating air resistanceAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children used templates provided by the teacher to make spinners of three different sizes, and theywere asked to investigate how the size of the spinner affects its speed as it falls.The children worked in pairs, and no further guidance was given to them by the teacher.The evidenceDoes the size of a spinner affect the speed it travels?To investigate this question we set out a fair test to show the effects of air resistance on a spinner. Our fairtest beginning like this, we stood on a table and dropped the spinners from a certain height. We timed thespinner as it dropped (shown by the diagram below).QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11. 11 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceWe found that the spinner with the least air resistance was the medium, as its time was 0.95 sec – thequickest time. This was a weird result because we thought that the small spinner should have been the oneto hit the ground before the others because it would have the least air resistance. The problems in this testare that whenever someone says GO to drop the spinner some people have different reactions – forexample, someone might click the stopwatch too early or too late. The same as when you stop thestopwatch when the spinner hits the floor. Also the person dropping the spinner may accidentally push thespinner up a little or they may not hold the spinner at the same height for each drop.Teacher’s notesCiaran said that the circles on his diagram represented air particles which push up against the surface ofthe spinner.Next steps Discussion of use of decimal places in practical measurements, and consideration of sensible degrees of accuracy for scientific measurements. Encouragement to make practical suggestions for improving working methods when considering how effective they are.Assessment commentaryCiaran uses abstract ideas in this work, and uses the appropriate notation to represent the forces involved.He shows that he can present a simple set of scientific data appropriately, making repeated measurementsand calculating the mean speed. He discusses unexpected results, suggesting plausible explanations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12. 12 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating frictionAssessment focusesAF2, AF4, AF5ContextDuring work on friction, children were shown several pictures of goalkeepers from the 1960s and 1970s andasked if they noticed anything surprising. They were quick to spot that goalkeepers in those days did notwear gloves.They were then put in role as scientists working for a research company who had been approached by awell-known sportswear firm to develop a new range of ‘Supa-Grip’ goalkeeper gloves. They were asked toinvestigate the best material for the palms of the gloves.The children were given a range of six different materials, each providing different amounts of friction,asked to devise their own fair test and record their results in a table provided. They had previously beentaught to measure using forcemeters, and were familiar with making sense of varying results by finding themean.The children were then asked to present their recommendations for the most suitable material for the newgloves, with explanations. They were also asked to suggest other tests that it would be necessary to carryout to determine this material’s general suitability.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13. 13 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14. 14 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesCiaran worked with his partner, placing the 1 kg mass on the various materials and measuring the forcerequired in order to move each material. During the investigation he made suggestions about how to usethe forcemeter safely – he knew that the spring might fly out of his partner’s hand, and suggested wearingsafety glasses when taking measurements from the forcemeter at close range.Next steps Development of the investigation further to work with two continuous variables (mass used and force required to move the mass). Encouragement of the evaluation of the effectiveness of working methods while work is in progress, and developing their ideas accordingly.Assessment commentaryCiaran links applications to underpinning scientific ideas. The provision of a table here prevents him fromdemonstrating his own skills, but he carries out a fair test, and identifies possible risks. While he incorrectlycalculates averages, he remains able to draw a straightforward conclusion.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15. 15 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Points of viewAssessment focusAF2ContextFor work on literacy, children are required to produce some writing on balanced arguments. They wereasked to identify arguments for and against scientific research using animals, and to find some examples.They completed this as a homework task.The evidenceNext steps Further activity to explore opinions in different contexts, including use of additives in water and in food, and application of technologies to sports. Looking at the difference between opinion and scientific evidence and how evidence rather than opinion should be used to support or challenge scientific arguments.Assessment commentaryCiaran describes different viewpoints held by a range of people about scientific developments, andidentifies some ethical and moral issues.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16. 16 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyCiaran works with abstract ideas and models using particle ideas and scientific ideas about reflection,friction and forces.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceIn work on the use of animals for research he can provide simple descriptions of different points of view ona science-related topic, identifying ethical and moral issues. Elsewhere he links applications to underlyingscience, such as in the importance of friction in goalkeepers’ gloves.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceCiaran can use appropriate scientific and mathematical conventions and terminology and recognises theimportance of collaboration with others in practical activity. He would, however, benefit from being providedwith opportunities to work more regularly with quantitative data to develop presentation and analytical skills.AF4 Using investigative approachesCiaran not only selects appropriate equipment when given a free choice, but can provide valid reasons fordoing so. He chooses to repeat measurements where appropriate, although this suggests a greaterprecision than is justified by using too many decimal places in values. This will improve through further workwith quantitative data.AF5 Working critically with evidenceCiaran is able to provide explanations for varying values, and draws valid conclusions using detailedevidence.Overall assessment judgementCiaran can be judged to have made a move onwards into low level 5. He satisfies a significant number ofcriteria in all assessment focuses at that level, although not always with confidence. This sample ofevidence is drawn from two terms’ work.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17. 17 of 17 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 4 and 5 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence science L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 5 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use abstract ideas or models or  Describe different viewpoints a range of  Distinguish between opinion and  Recognise significant variables  Interpret data in a variety of more than one step when people may have about scientific or scientific evidence in contexts related to in investigations, selecting the formats, recognising obvious describing processes or technological developments science, and use evidence rather than most suitable to investigate inconsistencies phenomena  Indicate how scientific or technological opinion to support or challenge  Explain why particular pieces of  Provide straightforward  Explain processes or developments may affect different scientific arguments equipment or information explanations for differences in phenomena, suggest solutions to groups of people in different ways  Decide on the most appropriate formats sources are appropriate for the repeated observations or problems or answer questions by  Identify ethical or moral issues linked to to present sets of scientific data, such questions or ideas under measurements drawing on abstract ideas or scientific or technological developments as using line graphs for continuous investigation  Draw valid conclusions that models variables  Repeat sets of observations or utilise more than one piece of  Link applications of science or  Recognise scientific questions technology to their underpinning  Use appropriate scientific and measurements where supporting evidence, including that do not yet have definitive scientific ideas mathematical conventions and appropriate, selecting suitable numerical data and line graphs answers terminology to communicate abstract ranges and intervals  Evaluate the effectiveness of  Identify the use of evidence and ideas  Make, and act on, suggestions their working methods, making creative thinking by scientists in  Suggest how collaborative approaches to control obvious risks to practical suggestions for the development of scientific to specific experiments or investigations themselves and others improving them ideas may improve the evidence collected      L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 4 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use scientific ideas when  Describe some simple positive and  Select appropriate ways of presenting  Decide when it is appropriate to  Identify patterns in data describing simple processes or negative consequences of scientific and scientific data carry out fair tests in presented in various formats, phenomena technological developments  Use appropriate scientific forms of investigations including line graphs  Use simple models to describe  Recognise applications of specific language to communicate scientific  Select appropriate equipment or  Draw straightforward scientific ideas scientific ideas ideas, processes or phenomena information sources to address conclusions from data  Identify scientific evidence that is  Identify aspects of science used within  Use scientific and mathematical specific questions or ideas presented in various formats being used to support or refute particular jobs or roles conventions when communicating under investigation  Identify scientific evidence they ideas or arguments information or ideas  Make sets of observations or have used in drawing measurements, identifying the conclusions ranges and intervals used  Suggest improvements to their  Identify possible risks to working methods, giving themselves and others reasonsBL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 4 Secure 4  High 4 Low 5  Secure 5 High 5 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-11 © Crown copyright 2009