Matthieu Kassovitz
(1995, France)
World Cinema:
Urban Stories
‘La Haine’ intro
• The film is about three teenage friends and their struggle to live in
the banlieues of Paris.
• The fil...
„Vive la France!
• La Haine is a French film that is said to ‘subvert cultural expectations’.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Parlez vous l...
‘La Haine’ and modern multicultural France
•
•
La Haine is set in the banlieues of Paris. The phrase les banlieues has be...
Historical context of the film.
•
•
Kassovitz has said that the idea came to him when a young Zairian, Makome
M'Bowole w...
Historical Background
 Slavery in France
(1780‟s)
 The dependence on
colonial slavery
 French Colonial &
Postcolonial h...
Historical Background
 WWI and WW II:
The Senegalese
Shooters (Les
Tirailleurs
Sénégalais) French colonial
soldiers
 Lib...
French Immigration History
 1930‟s France had a
higher percentage of
foreigners than the
United States.
 Immigrants firs...
French Immigration History
 Recruitment of African
labor to come and work
in factories in the
aftermath of WWII.
 Establ...
Racism in France








The Extreme Right
National Front
Jean Marie LePen
National Preference
rationale.
“pure F...
Racism in France
• LePen receiving 16% of
the vote in 2002 1st round
(second largest share of
the vote).
• “Vote for the c...
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La haine intro

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - La haine intro

  • 1. Matthieu Kassovitz (1995, France) World Cinema: Urban Stories
  • 2. ‘La Haine’ intro • The film is about three teenage friends and their struggle to live in the banlieues of Paris. • The film focuses on a single day in the lives of three young friends in an impoverished multi-ethnic banlieues housing project in the aftermath of a riot. • Vinz (Vincent Cassel), who is Jewish, is filled with rage. An aspirational gangster. • Saïd (Saïd Taghmaoui) is a happy and talkative Maghrebin (Arab) who tries to find middle ground between his two friends' responses to life. • Hubert (Hubert Koundé) is an Afro-French boxer and drug dealer. The quietest of the three, he sadly contemplates the ghetto and the hate around him. • The title derives from a line spoken by one of them, Hubert: "La haine attire la haine!", "hatred breeds hatred."
  • 3. „Vive la France! • La Haine is a French film that is said to ‘subvert cultural expectations’. • • • • • • • Parlez vous la Francais? Have you been to France? What stereotypes would we associate with French culture and France as a nation? Love of art and high culture Fine wine and cuisine Haute couture fashion Garlic and smelly cheese Gross toilets! • What about characteristics/stereotypes of French people: • • • • Sophisticated and stylish. Passionate, romantic Rude and arrogant. Feel they are superior. • The last two are negative views often from a British perspective. Indeed the French think the British are equally rude and arrogant- and that we can‟t cook!
  • 4. ‘La Haine’ and modern multicultural France • • La Haine is set in the banlieues of Paris. The phrase les banlieues has been increasingly used as a euphemism to describe low-income housing projects in which mainly French of foreign descent reside. do we know about the immigrant groups in France? Is France multicultural? Can you name any famous non-white European French people? • So modern France is very multicultural with lots of immigrant communities mainly from Africa. Why Africa? • French colonial rule of Africa. Many nations in Africa speak French as first language including, Morocco, Tunisia Senegal, Ivory Coast, Cameroon and many more
  • 5. Historical context of the film. • • Kassovitz has said that the idea came to him when a young Zairian, Makome M'Bowole was shot in 1993. He was killed at point blank range while in police custody and handcuffed to a radiator. The officer was reported to have been angered by Makomé's words, and had been threatening him when the gun went off accidentally. How does the film reference this event? • Kassovitz wanted the film to be „wake up call‟ to France about the problems of the banlieues slums. • He also wanted to express the feelings of ‘marginalisation’ many immigrant groups felt as victims of social deprivation in a country that had ignored them for a long time. • In addition France was in the middle of period when the extreme „far right‟ party Front National (France‟s equivalent of the BNP) where gaining support. This is shown in the scene involving the skinhead.
  • 6. Historical Background  Slavery in France (1780‟s)  The dependence on colonial slavery  French Colonial & Postcolonial history in Africa
  • 7. Historical Background  WWI and WW II: The Senegalese Shooters (Les Tirailleurs Sénégalais) French colonial soldiers  Liberation of European cities by Africans
  • 8. French Immigration History  1930‟s France had a higher percentage of foreigners than the United States.  Immigrants first flowed in from neighboring countries (Spain, Italy, Poland, Be lgium)  (1914-1918) Aftermath of WWI, shortage of workforce  Recruitment of foreign labor, mostly Polish (1930)  Increase in African immigration (1963)
  • 9. French Immigration History  Recruitment of African labor to come and work in factories in the aftermath of WWII.  Establishment of harsh living conditions to discourage permanent immigration.  The labourers end up staying and bring their families over.  Shift from “les bidonsvilles” to “Les banlieues”.  Social exclusion
  • 10. Racism in France         The Extreme Right National Front Jean Marie LePen National Preference rationale. “pure Frenchness” Unassimilability based on culture and ethnicity “Second and third generation immigrants” Liberty, equality fraternity (contradiction)
  • 11. Racism in France • LePen receiving 16% of the vote in 2002 1st round (second largest share of the vote). • “Vote for the crook not the fascist” • Jacques Chirac 1995 2007 - healing the social rift (fracture sociale) • Sarcozy 2007 – 2012 tough on immigration/ insecurity (UMP – center right.).