Learning to Exist in Social Media
A Grounded Theory about Adolescents’ Understanding
of Their Interactions in Social Medi...
Agenda
Context
Purpose
Review of The Literature
Research Questions
Methodology
Results
Conclusion
Suggestion for Future Re...
Context
Social media
Main communication tool used by adolescents
Lebanon
Highest percentage of users accessing the Inter...
Purpose of the Study
The purpose of this qualitative interpretive study was to
better understand adolescents’ mental repre...
Offline/ Online Adolescents
Bennett & Maton
Blais, Craig, Pepler, & Connolly
Boneva, Quinn, Kraut, Kiesler,
Shklovski
Cynka...
Research Questions
What are adolescents’ mental representations
of their practices with social media?
How do adolescents ...
Methodology
A Grounded Theory Design
Elements
Constructs
1 5
Data Analysis
RepGrid
Grounded theory approach
Transcribin...
Results
Open Coding
Elements (or factors) affecting adolescents' use of
social media
Related to the technology
Constraints to use (technical/c...
1st question: adolescents’ description and
interpretation of their practices in social media and
their outcomes
According...
The Foundations of Adolescents’ Interaction in Social Media
- the model emerging from the grounded theory
Learn to exist...
The Foundations of Adolescents’ Interaction in Social Media
- the model emerging from the grounded theory
Casual conditi...
Learn to [exist]
and
Learn [to exist]
Physiological
Safety
Love/Belonging
Esteem
Self-
actualization
PhysiologicalSafetyLove/Belonging
Esteem
Self-
actualizatio...
Conclusion
Transferable Construct 

Adolescents face two challenges to flourish online:
1.Learn to [exist] through acquiri...
Suggestions for Future Research
Action research to accompany a group
of adolescents in formal learning settings
and observ...
Examining Committee:
Dr. Ann-Louise Davidson, Supervisor
Dr. Saul Carliner
Dr. David Waddington
Dr. Pavel Trofimovitch,...
Naffi_Nadia_2012_Learning to Exist in Social Media- A grounded Theory About Adolescents Understanding of Their Interactio...
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Naffi_Nadia_2012_Learning to Exist in Social Media- A grounded Theory About Adolescents Understanding of Their Interactions in Social Media, Their Impact on Their Everyday Life and the Behavior They Develop to Manage Them

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Naffi_Nadia_2012_Learning to Exist in Social Media- A grounded Theory About Adolescents Understanding of Their Interactions in Social Media, Their Impact on Their Everyday Life and the Behavior They Develop to Manage Them

  • 1. Learning to Exist in Social Media A Grounded Theory about Adolescents’ Understanding of Their Interactions in Social Media, Their Impact on Their Everyday Life and the Behaviour They Develop to Manage Them Nadia Naffi 2012
  • 2. Agenda Context Purpose Review of The Literature Research Questions Methodology Results Conclusion Suggestion for Future Research
  • 3. Context Social media Main communication tool used by adolescents Lebanon Highest percentage of users accessing the Internet from their mobile phones / Smartphones in the Middle East Highest at home WI-FI availability in the Middle East Issues 2G cellular phones services (3G services launched in October 2011) Ranked 160th regarding Internet connectivity
  • 4. Purpose of the Study The purpose of this qualitative interpretive study was to better understand adolescents’ mental representation of their practices in social media and detect instances of informal learning, based solely on how participants construed their experiences.
  • 5. Offline/ Online Adolescents Bennett & Maton Blais, Craig, Pepler, & Connolly Boneva, Quinn, Kraut, Kiesler, Shklovski Cynkar Erikson Lehdonvirta & Rasanen Lenhart, Madden, Smith, Purcell, Zickuhr, & Rainie Margalit Mesch. The Nielsen Company Ong, Ang, Ho, Lim,, Goh, Lee & Chua Patchin, & Hinduja Pew Internet Reich Saul Subrahmanyam, Garcia, Harsono, Li & Lipana, Reich, Waechter & Espinoza Tapscott Twenge Valkenburg & Peter Van Cleemput Varnhagen, McFall,Pugh, Routledge,Sumida-MacDonaldKwong Social media’s affordances and risks (including addiction) Acier Amichai-Hamburger Block boyd & Ellison Chakraborty, Basu & Kumar Cotterell Foxman Grannovetter Guan & Subrahmanya Ito, Baumer, Bittanti, boyd, Cody, Herr-Stephenson &Trip Joinson Jonsson Kaplan & Haenlein, Liang, Commins & Duffy Maranto, & Barton Norton Roe Surratt, Thompson & Cupples, Villella, Martinotti, Di Nicola, Cassano, La Torre, Gliubizzi, Messeri, Petruccelli, Bria & Janiri Zamaria & Fletcher Informal learning Carliner Greenhow & Robelia Smith Learning with social media Perreault Tessier-Bouchard Wenger   Wesch   Williams  &  Edge Learning theories Bandura (self-efficacy) O'Donnell, D'Amico, Schmid, Reeve, & Smith Vygotsky & Cole Methodology Chevalier & Buckles Creswell Fransella Gaines & Shaw Glaser & Strauss Huberman & Miles Jankowicz Kelly Social media in Lebanon bayt.com. Economic Research & Analysis Department iloubnan.info Theories of motivation Maslow Rutledge Ryan & Deci Body of Literature Covered
  • 6. Research Questions What are adolescents’ mental representations of their practices with social media? How do adolescents explain their behavior in social media, and its consequences on their offline life? How do they construe their interactions with the social media apps they use inside their networks? Are adolescents aware of instances of learning while in social media? What type of learning do adolescents perceive as possible with social media?
  • 7. Methodology A Grounded Theory Design Elements Constructs 1 5 Data Analysis RepGrid Grounded theory approach Transcribing and translating 13 hours of interviews Open coding Axial coding Selective coding Credibility and trustworthiness Participants Instruments Semi-structured interview Construct analysis interview Validation interview
  • 8. Results Open Coding
  • 9. Elements (or factors) affecting adolescents' use of social media Related to the technology Constraints to use (technical/connection/quality/cost/etc.), Access- Practicality (wherever, whenever), Level of complexity (complicated/simple, clear, easy), Synchronicity (instant/delayed messages), Updates of the technology, Degree of privacy, Negative effects of social media Related to the user Prior impressions, Degree of formality/ amusement, Level of satisfaction, Degree of usefulness (as an indirect communication method, as a rapprochement facilitator, as self-disclosure tool), Identification as a present or future need, Out-datedness of the medium & Technology replacement, Egocentrism, Relationship with the medium (technology), Cyborg, Personification of the medium, Shaping of the technology,Level of "addiction", Red light effect, Relationship with online strangers, Level of online xenophobia (fear of online strangers) Related to others Expectations from others & Others' expectations, Replies, comments etc., Double life, Being alive only if active on social media, Competition's intensity, Parents' reactions Results Open Coding Reason for first use (Initiation to social media) Wow effect (Majority effect, Novelty effect) Peer pressure + Fear of disappearing (being forgotten) Curiosity/ Search/ Discovery Consequences of a hypothetical absence of social media on participants’ offline life Positive outcome Negative outcome Learning in social media Informal learning: to use the medium (Social learning, Autonomously through Experimentation, Social learning & Experimental learning) Informal learning: with the technology (Technology as a learning tool, Technology as a learning environment, Group knowledge, Socialization, Management skills, Texting/ Chatting abbreviations, Learning abbreviations,Creating abbreviations)
  • 10. 1st question: adolescents’ description and interpretation of their practices in social media and their outcomes According to participants, their practices in social media were an addiction, resulting from a necessity and managed by functionality 2nd question: Adolescents’ awareness of instances of learning while in social media According to participants, their main reason for using social media was to stay connected, to communicate and to have fun. Learning was never the purpose, unless one of their teachers used social media as an environment for class interactions Answers to the Research Questions A person’s processes are psychologically channelized by the ways in which he anticipates events (Kelly, 1991)
  • 11. The Foundations of Adolescents’ Interaction in Social Media - the model emerging from the grounded theory Learn to existLearn to exist
  • 12. The Foundations of Adolescents’ Interaction in Social Media - the model emerging from the grounded theory Casual conditions Majority effect Novelty effect Peer pressure Gaining technical skills: Learning how to use the medium Gaining socialization skills: Learning to socialize through and within the medium Gaining managerial skills: Learning to manage the usage of the medium and deal with its constraints Extension of adolescents cognition Gaining new knowledge through accessing the group knowledge and receiving and sharing new pieces of information Autonomously and/or with social interactions Learn to [exist] Learn [to exist] Context Core category Phenomenon ConsequencesStrategies Actions/ Interactions Searching/ Discovering/ Experiencing/ Evaluating/ Making decisions Intervening conditions Related to the technology Related to the user Related to others Lebanon Social media main communication tool used by adolescents Need social presence [of] others Need social presence [to] others Fear of disappearing (being forgotten) Learn to exist
  • 13. Learn to [exist] and Learn [to exist]
  • 14. Physiological Safety Love/Belonging Esteem Self- actualization PhysiologicalSafetyLove/Belonging Esteem Self- actualization Physiological Safety Love/Belonging Esteem Self- actualization Physiological Safety Love/Belonging Esteem Self- actualization Physiological Safety Love/Belonging Esteem Self-actualization Physiological Safety Love/Belonging Esteem Self- actualization Physiological Safety Love / Belonging Esteem Self- actualization Physiological Safety Love / Belonging Esteem Self- actualization PhysiologicalSafetyLove / BelongingEsteem Self- actualization 19 8 7 65 4 3 2 Adapted from Maslow Physiological Safety Love / Belonging Esteem Self-actualization Internet connectivity Device (mobile phone, computer, iPad, iPod...) Applications Sites From strangers, cyberbullies, hackers, thiefs Digital health (moderate and controlled use) Privacy Online connections and friends Comunities of practice Online interest groups Self-esteem Respect of/ by others High Interactiactivity (posts, comments, likes) Self-efficacy Personal growth Personal fulfillment Self-development Feeling of own value Learning to exist Need to Exist
  • 15. Conclusion Transferable Construct 
 Adolescents face two challenges to flourish online: 1.Learn to [exist] through acquiring technical skills 2.Learn [to exist] through developing online soft skills Achieved due to adolescents’ self-determination and intrinsic motivation to learn. Future Research Questions Now that we understand the motives behind adolescents’ autonomous and seamless informal learning in social media, how can we 1. Create a learning environment in our schools that mirrors the environment in which adolescents are living while in social media, where students feel the need and the passion to learn, set goals for themselves and thrive autonomously to achieve them? 2. Integrate the technologies that are already part of our adolescents’ lives in this new school environment? Limitations of the Study 1. Not generalizable but transferable 2. Qualitative interpretive study (self-reported data, inductive analysis)
  • 16. Suggestions for Future Research Action research to accompany a group of adolescents in formal learning settings and observe: The qualitative changes that may occur in how this group construe learning with social media Participants’ engagement in new learning processes with social media Pedagogical changes with social media (shift of ownership of knowledge) Ethnography, narrative or case study with various groups of adolescents to: Observe them for a significant period of time Observe how adolescents’ social media behaviors affect their cognitive and emotional development directly and indirectly Apply new knowledge into the educational system
  • 17. Examining Committee: Dr. Ann-Louise Davidson, Supervisor Dr. Saul Carliner Dr. David Waddington Dr. Pavel Trofimovitch, Chair

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