SurGeA Collaborative Contemporary Art Center
2
NANCY FARAGE
ACADEMY of ART UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL of
INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN
FINAL REVIEW PROJECT I THESIS
S...
4
..
ANALYSIS
24 CLIENTS
26 USERS’ BIOS
32 SITE
36 BUILDING
STUDIES
14 HEADLANDS ART CENTER
16 SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL
18 A...
6
ABSTRACT
INCEPTION
NOTION
MISSION
CONCEPTION
8
ABSTRACT/INCEPTION
Surge aims to create a holistic and renewed
vantage point for struggling, emerging profes-
sional art...
10
ABSTRACT/MISSION /CONCEPTION
Surge is a holistic approach to art, consid-
erate of the past, concerned with the present...
12
STUDIES
HEADLANDS ART CENTER
SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL
AMSTEL INSTITUTE
GRAFFITI CAFE
14
This tranquil Art Center is situated just north of the
Golden Gate bridge at Fort Barry in the Marin Head-
lands on a b...
16
STUDIES/SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL, SHANGHAI, CHINA
The Art-in-Residence program at the Swatch Art
Peace Hotel faces Shangh...
18
STUDIES/UNIVERSITY OF ANSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
The University of Amsterdam’s Amstel campus is a hub
for mathematicians an...
20
STUDIES/GRAFFITI CAFE, VARNA, BULGARIA
Located in a hotel below the Gallery of Modern Art, the
Graffiti café was inspir...
22
ANALYSIS
CLIENTS
USERS’ BIOS
SITE
BUILDING
24
Developer/ Group i
Amongst these main supporters are three hundred plus, supporters contributing to the Surge community...
26
Established Professional Artist/ Jesse Barnard
Jesse is a focused, intense, and passionate
dancer who speaks to and ins...
28
An aspiring traveler and AAU jewlery design graduate
student, Kirsten adores bubble tea and creates her own
mixes each ...
30
Jada is a free-spirited, tree-hugging, critter loving
third-grade teacher in Southern California, who
simply loves to l...
32
THE CITY
San Francisco attracts people from all over the
world, often called “the New York of the West,” and
the “City ...
34
SOMA DEMOGRAPHICS
Total Population
Males
Females
Avg. Age
Total Households
Households w/ Children
Partner Living Arrang...
36
Situated in SOMA’s mid-market, the Butcher Building is a historical
cotton factory at 1161 Mission Street, between 7th ...
38
A B C D
23'-3" 23'-6" 23'-3"
75'
Basement
-11'-6"
Level 1
±0"
Level 2
+10'-6"
Level 3
+20'-6"
Level 4
+35'-3"
Level 5
+...
40
EXISTING PLANS/NTS
ANALYSIS/BUILDING
42
SCOPE
PROGRAM
PLANS
STRUCTURAL
44
SCOPE/PROGRAM
SPECS
Year Renovated: 2015
Zoning: B, A-2, A-3 (Business/Assembly)
Levels: 5, plus Basement & Rooftop
Foo...
46
CAVENOUS MUSIC STUDIO
NEXUS CAFE
DANCE STUDIO
FASHION STUDIO
NUCLEUS WORKSHOP
NUCLEUS ARTISTS' LOUNGE
STAFF BREAKROOM
V...
48
SCOPE/PLANS
11' TYP 17'-2" TYP 89'-1" 8'-5" TYP 9'-10" TYP 20'-2" TYP
6'-8"7'-6"
4'
32'-11"15'11'-7"TYP13'-1"TYP
22'-4"...
50
37'-6"10'-6"
79'-11" 78'-2"
37'-9"16'-6"
50' 19'-4" TYP
VIEWING LOBBY
FASHION + COSTUME STUDIO
DANCE STUDIO
GUEST CONFE...
52
48'6'-3"
32'-7" 70'-2" 6' 49'-5"
32'-8"14'-10"
10'-10" 59'-6"
4' TYP
13'-9"
UP
VANGUARD FORUM
VANGUARD LOBBY
VANGUARD B...
54
33'-6"2'18'-10"
37'-6"10'-6"
79' 17'-4" 61'-5"
11' 5'-2" 50'-2" 22'-9"
FUSINE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
FUSINE KITCHEN
1 RECE...
56
spaces
SURGE I LOBBY
NEXUS I CAFE
FRUITIOUS I GALLERY
CAVENOUS I MUSIC STUDIOS
NUCLEUS I WORK HUB
THE VANGUARD I FORUM
...
58
Fascia is a specialized system of densely woven, thin yet incredibly
strong connective tissue envelops, supports, conne...
LOBBY
64
Every body part is inextricably connected to
every other part.
SURGE LOBBY, FRUITIOUS GALLERY
& NEXUS CAFE
1 MAIN ENTRA...
FEATURE DISPLAY
SHELVING/HOST
70
Acts as a unifying center, wherein cre-
ative shifters and movers of our society,
each with their unique perspectives,
...
COUNTER
OPEN STAGE
BAR, PAIRS
LOUNGE/BANQUETTES
80
A single structure existing from head to toe.
CAVENOUS MUSIC
& DANCE STUDIOS
1 GUEST LOBBY
2 GREENROOM
3 CONTROL ROOM
4...
ENTRANCE
GUEST LOBBY
GREENROOM
CONTROL
STUDIO ENTRANCE
STUDIO
94
Maintains equilibrium through a delicate
balance of tension and elasticity; through
three-dimensional movements toward
...
GROUP
THINK TANKS
ARTISTS’ LOUNGE
102
Facilitates
equal exchange
of multiple,
uniquely
functioning
and integral
elements.
VANGUARD FORUM, LOBBY &
BACKSTAGE
...
BALCONY/ENTRANCE
COCKTAILS
LOBBY LOUNGE
LOUNGE BAR
FORUM/BALCONY
FORUM/STEPS
116
Many individual collagenous fibers weave,
cleave, then fuse together to form a holistic,
unified web-like structure.
F...
HOST
INDOOR/OUTDOOR BAR
LOUNGE
SWINGS/GROUP
SWINGS/PAIRS
LOW SEATS
TALL SEATS
132
DESIGN/ER
PRINT
SOURCES
BIO
RESUME
CREDITS
To
create
one’s
own
world
in
the
arts
takes
courage.
GEORGIE O’KEEFE
134
Rising to the occasion, Surge has
been recently erected amongst its
fellow establishments with a pro-
fessional missio...
136
NANCY FARAGE
6599 Dublin Blvd Ste 408 Dublin, California 94568
1.206.407.7403
Nancy.Farage@gmail.com
http://www.linked...
138
Art is creating
something out of
nothing.
I owe all of my
creativity
to its giver, God.
My art is
empowered
by the fir...
NancyFarage_FinalReviewThesis_Surge_View
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NancyFarage_FinalReviewThesis_Surge_View

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
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Transcripts - NancyFarage_FinalReviewThesis_Surge_View

  • 1. SurGeA Collaborative Contemporary Art Center
  • 2. 2 NANCY FARAGE ACADEMY of ART UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL of INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN FINAL REVIEW PROJECT I THESIS SUMMER 2015 I 03031386 Art is the choreoraphy of thought and motion. GINIA A. DAVIS
  • 3. 4 .. ANALYSIS 24 CLIENTS 26 USERS’ BIOS 32 SITE 36 BUILDING STUDIES 14 HEADLANDS ART CENTER 16 SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL 18 AMSTEL INSTITUTE 20 GRAFFITI CAFE . ...... ...... ABSTRACT 8 INCEPTION 9 NOTION 10 MISSION 11 CONCEPTION ..... 6 12 22 SCOPE 44 PROGRAM 46 PLANS 55 STRUCTURAL INTERIORS 58 SURGE I LOBBY 64 FRUITIOUS I GALLERY 70 NEXUS I CAFE 80 CAVENOUS I MUSIC STUDIOS 94 NUCLEUS I WORK HUB & LOUNGE 102 VANGUARD I FORUM & LOBBY 116 FUSINE I RESTAURANT & LOUNGE DESIGNER 134 PRINT 135 SOURCES 136 BIO 136 RESUME 138 CREDITS .... ..... ...... 42 56 134 .
  • 4. 6 ABSTRACT INCEPTION NOTION MISSION CONCEPTION
  • 5. 8 ABSTRACT/INCEPTION Surge aims to create a holistic and renewed vantage point for struggling, emerging profes- sional artists who have made strides in their profession but have not yet fully realized signif- icant progress in their career development. Our six-month AIM program also extends a space for nationally established professionals to apply their experience in a globally meaningful way while engaging in a unique exchange of new ideas from their emerging peers. We offer an atmosphere which incites growth through exploration and experimentation, laying the groundwork from which genius arises and diverse character thrives. We hope to continually support artists and the Bay Area community in a process of deepened self-discovery, identification and representation due to profound exposure to unfamiliar artistic angles and associations. In a global society dominated by politics and busi- ness, Surge believes that it is our cultural duty to vigorously promote the arts. Especially within a large metropolis like San Francisco, the presence of the arts must be securely upheld within the construct and fabric of the city’s identity. The beautiful San Francisco identifies itself as the city of art, housing diverse communities of young and talented professionals seeking career opportuni- ties and reputable positions. The city of art, attracting over fifteen million tourists annually, particularly to historical and artistic attractions, must actively seek to foster its identity as such. San Francisco’s art graduates from institutions in- cluding the Academy of Art University, and the San Francisco Art Institute take their art quite seriously and personally. Post-graduation, however, there are limited positions and opportunities available for them within the city they have come to love, San Francisco itself. As students struggle to work in their field within San Francisco or travel outside of it, seek- ing experience and opportunities, they find it difficult to thrive in their passions without the necessary men- torship, resources, and space. It is the center’s goal to seek to fulfill these needs by offering the mentorship, resources, space, outlet, as well as, the inspiration to nurture artists to reach their full potential. Moreover, for San Francisco’s larger community, and specifically, the South of Market District, its resi- dents are vigorously in need of an ongoing and acces- sible center for the arts, designed for the average local as much as the successful business person or tourist. By addressing communal challenges through artistic outreach and performances, Surge is contributing to communal growth and improvement, seeking to initiate a trend at large within the area. For centuries, the majority of artists have worked in static relationship with one another, in individualistic space. Surge sees this as an opportunity for innova- tion, growth and improvement. We believe that static individualism is against the laws of nature because artists are innately multi-dimensional, dynamic beings, and that together, artists can thrive and build a healthier and more beautiful holistic identity in the arts, while also expressing their individuality fully. It is Surge’s utmost belief that artists’ creative needs and challenges are better addressed within the context of a collaborative space and communal environment. Moreover, the needs of the greater community and culture are met through the inter-disciplinary and intra-disciplinary interaction and problem-solving skills of a whole body of artists. Surge believes that in working together across diverse disciplines, artists are able to connect new and transformational approach- es and revelations to art, to form a more complete understanding of their own goals within the context of the greater community. /NOTION
  • 6. 10 ABSTRACT/MISSION /CONCEPTION Surge is a holistic approach to art, consid- erate of the past, concerned with the present and invested in the future. We are a center that nurtures innovative, nationally emerging artists, including numerous individuals with- in the SOMA community itself and across the Bay Area. These hard working individu- als, who are dedicated to their artwork, are striving to create a career in dance, music, culinary or fashion and/or costume design. Artists are accepted into our six-month Artists in Mentorship (AIM) program, which draws upon the guidance of seasoned profes- sionals in various performance, visual, trade, and performance art fields, to facilitate in- tra-disciplinary, as well as, inter-disciplinary collaboration amongst all member artists. In this dynamic avenue of equally valued exchanges, we offer our artists an opportuni- ty to make new and meaningful connections in a collective, rather than individualistic, approach to art creation, whereby truly inventive works are birthed. Through the multiple layers of stylistic diversity, individ- ual voices challenge one another to create a complex avenue for repeatedly original, yet unified expression. We believe that this take art to an entirely new height of reward. At Surge, dance, music, fashion, costume, and culinary perspectives share an equal stage during the creation process within our Cavenous Studios & Nucleus Workhub, while also featuring their work at our Frui- tion Gallery, the Vanguard Forum, as well as, within Fusine, our rooftop restaurant lounge. AIM navigates artists toward one another and binds them together, along with, their community members. Bay Area residents, jointly with visitors, are offered an innovative experimental taste of art. Through all our venues, the center serves to drive artists of many ages, experience levels and styles up- ward and forward through artistic freedom and communication, grounding the art com- munity’s ties in the SOMA neighborhood for the future. Surge is a center for contemporary art forms; we cultivate collaborative art experi- ences from the innovative marriage of both modern and postmodern stylistic visions. We encourage the modern avant-gardism of truly inventive creation, as well as the postmodern spirit of contextual and mean- ingful contemplation. The contemporary- the current- is a socially and politically present vantage point from which, we believe, fu- ture-minded works can be mindfully crafted & holistically fashioned. Surge is designed with a central con- cept of physical movement through in- terconnected tissue in the body, known as fascia. The center knows that at the heart of the truly inventive process is an art- ist invested to moving away from the ordinary and toward the extraordinary, forming a labored growth of oneself and one’s art. The symbol of the body’s fascia beauti- fully represents the holistically intensive process of artistry from ideation to creation. Fascia is a three-dimension- al network of densely woven, fragile, yet resilient connective tissue which envelops, supports, connects, separates and fosters the successful performance of each and every muscle, bone, organ nerve, and vessel in the body. We are passionate about being a unifying center, wherein creative shifters and movers of our society, network their unique perspectives to form a holistic web-like whole, in the process of also furthering a distinct vision of their own. Like the fascia, Surge acts as a gravita- tional pull for avid artists into a con- tinuous centrality of community, and providing them with an avenue to move forward into growth and liberal expan- sion of their artistry. Finally, the center also supports their outward movement through the process of sharing their talent with the public. Through challenging experiences, the center offers a balance of expanding artists’ creative vantage points, coupled with the freedom of forward, upward and outward movement.
  • 7. 12 STUDIES HEADLANDS ART CENTER SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL AMSTEL INSTITUTE GRAFFITI CAFE
  • 8. 14 This tranquil Art Center is situated just north of the Golden Gate bridge at Fort Barry in the Marin Head- lands on a beautiful natural property. The campus is a cluster of artist-rehabilitated historic military buildings repurposed for artists’ residences and studios with a community grounded in quiet nature, genuine talent and creative intuition. Headlands Center for the Arts is a successfully imple- mented interdisciplinary experience of international art dedicated to both artists, artwork itself, and the community. It supports innovation, the creative pro- cess and the sharing of such work across visual, perfor- mance and trade artists. The center has the honorable mission of creating an environment conducive to artists’ development of new work and ideas, while extending such works to the greater public to create open dialog, exchange, appreciation and role for art in our community. The rehabilitation of the building itself has proven to be both inventive and authentic to the persona of the original building. They have utilized the exiting bath- rooms as unisex, massive quarters, giant doors, unique furnishings, characteristic architectural elements, and defined spaces, such as the original building’s mess hall. Moreover, their spaces are multipurpose, available to rent out to the public for events, which many hap- pily utilize. Headlands Center also offers many public programs and hold numerous events in collaboration with its artists and public, including artist-led hikes and special dinners, which are always delicious. Specialty, unique, singular artist-made items are also sold to the public. Surge’s staff has personally experienced the impact- ful artistic voice and persona of the unified body of independent voices within the communal building. STUDIES/HEADLANDS ART CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA Surge’s design has been exceptionally informed by the successful implementation of architectural and program- matic innovation within these notable projects.
  • 9. 16 STUDIES/SWATCH ART PEACE HOTEL, SHANGHAI, CHINA The Art-in-Residence program at the Swatch Art Peace Hotel faces Shanghai’s busiest city street and its most upscale district, “The Bund.” This classic 1850 building’s seven floors has been renovated in 2011. The program is designed to host artists across different disciplines and styles fee-free, providing them with private work-studios equipped with their specific needs, a restaurant, an exhibition gallery to show their work to the Shanghai community, com- munal work spaces meant for artists to collaborate, communal kitchen, and, even, rooftop terrace with a city view. The spaces are beautiful and diverse in function, and aesthetic. The focus of the program is the artists’ exchange with one another, as well as, with other hotel guests. The program offers a message space where artists can notify one another of upcoming events and in general provides many opportunities for them to cross paths and interact in a variety of ways, while they focus on their artwork. To give back, artists are expected to create a “trace” to add to the hotel’s collection. This pro- gram is precisely representative of the Surge pro- grammatic emphasis on innovation, collaboration and architectural design needs. Moreover, Swatch Art Peace Hotel utilizes its space for contemporary function, featuring a play on clean lines, large scale and colorful callouts throughout the building. It is especially inspiring to see a space which welcomes and fosters artists in such a beautiful building that meets all their needs in a busy, up- scale location. Here, the best spaces are offered to artists in an effort to truly foster their growth and innovation.
  • 10. 18 STUDIES/UNIVERSITY OF ANSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS The University of Amsterdam’s Amstel campus is a hub for mathematicians and scientists. Providing math and science education, the Amstel institute employs incred- ibly sleek and modern lines to captivate its users and utilize the space most efficiently despite the plethora of columns. OIII Architects’ design of color, scale, and contrast creates visual excitement for the students and staff. It fea- tures basic forms and linear qualities that define the space vertically and horizontally in a very organized fashion. It is a successful space planning feat, implementing inventive use of space in an extremely organized rhythm, creating distinction between spaces, directional impact and departmental unity. It marries minimalist purity with bold, graphic elements appeal without overuse or distrac- tion from main spaces. It appears that comfort, unity, and diversity are well accomplished within the space, as well as, streamlined visual intrigue.
  • 11. 20 STUDIES/GRAFFITI CAFE, VARNA, BULGARIA Located in a hotel below the Gallery of Modern Art, the Graffiti café was inspired to reference artistic movement. It was designed by Studio Mode to solve both functional acoustic and aesthetic design problems, wherein an inven- tive approach implemented architectural depth by using plywood. The repeating plywood strips create acoustic pockets and a dynamic visual field. The detailed, exposed lighting opens up the space, while the white flooring and furnishings yield all attention to the wooden detailing. The choice of tile located within the larger building context, creates an ongoing flow and dynamic form, in an otherwise static interior. Especially impressive, are the use of columns to form sculptural beauty while providing use for the building’s needs. Although columns can be exceptionally challeng- ing and limiting, Studio Mode has used them as innovative tools in a truly inspiring outcome.
  • 12. 22 ANALYSIS CLIENTS USERS’ BIOS SITE BUILDING
  • 13. 24 Developer/ Group i Amongst these main supporters are three hundred plus, supporters contributing to the Surge community. We are honored to have a strong partner network contributing to our communal art outreach project, AIM. Group I. Group I is a San Francisco based developer with extensive experience in redeveloping & renovating historical buildings within the city. Group I centralizes partnerships between public and private sectors, work- ing with both to maximize the city’s existing buildings and resources. This developer has a holistic and diverse approach to rebuilding the city and seeks to lead an architectural & interior design through its many phases and elements, including financing, construction, property management and marketing. They aim create accessible, progressive projects and envision a socially and culturally devel- oped future for our city, in which the commu- nity can “live and exchange ideas together in dynamic and energizing urban settings that inspire happiness, celebrate diversity, and promote productivity.” Surge has a steady partnership with Group I fueled by the singu- larity of our visions. The Raushenberg Foundation supports causes that have a vision aligned with its founder (and namesake’s) vision, “Art can change the world.” The Rashen- berg’s Artistic Innovation and Collabo- ration program, or AIC, offers grants to programs with core values based in ex- perimentation, innovation and collabora- tion. The grants are given to centers that foster multistage artistic experimentation and identify and support emergent artis- tic talent. Surge is proud to be a recipient of Raushenberg’s financial support. Sponsor/ Raushenberg Foundation The CAC’s Creative California Communities Program supports collaborative projects that imple- ment art as a central cultural and communal development strategy for California cities, helping build strong arts organizations and professional development of arts leaders.. It’s aim is to encourage and strengthen residential and visitor involvement in the arts, part- nering with organizations whose central goals align with these priorities. Surge is excited to have CAC’s support. Sponsor/ California Arts Council Artworks, the National Endowment for the Arts, provides grants for organiza- tions dedicated to excellent art creation promoting public engagement with, and strengthening communities through the arts. As an independent agency of the federal government, it seeks to support artistic creativity and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. Surge is pleased with the matching grants Artworks has provided for its AIM pro- gram. Sponsor/ Artworks Sponsor/ Foundation for Contemporary Arts The FCA grant programs encourage, sponsor and pro- mote innovative, contemporary and imaginative art in dance, music/sound, theatre/performance art, poetry & the visual arts. The organization seeks to encourage artists exploration and engage in promising organiza- tions with powerful visions. Surge is grateful to FCA’s contribution. Alliance/ Council of Fashion Designers for America The goal of the CFDA is to further the position of fashion de- sign as a recognized branch of American art and culture, and aims to promote and improve public understanding and appreciation of the fashion arts, and create part- nerships which lead to collaborative design opportunities for innovative contemporary artists. This alliance supports Surge’s efforts to unilaterally elevate the arts, namely fash- ion design as an equal disciplinary focus amongst the art community. Alliance/ the James Irvine Foundation The James Irvine Foundation supports the con- temporary visual arts, including interdisciplinary programs and have various gallery, project, and urban outcome projects to encourage public artistic growth. Their Arts program works to promote engagement in the arts for Califor- nian public residents. They are a key partner to Surge’s communal goals. ANALYSIS/CLIENTS
  • 14. 26 Established Professional Artist/ Jesse Barnard Jesse is a focused, intense, and passionate dancer who speaks to and inspires others with his body language. He likes to think he’s creating an elusive mirage of reality, reconstructing other’s sense of place, mood and perspective. He loves working with impressionable charac- ters who are driven, convicted and “pure flaming fire,” as he likes to call it. Jesse enjoys choreographing pieces that are guided by the juxtaposition and un- expected unity of seemingly oppositional mood elements within each dance. He believes in his work and in people’s creative potential, even the most ordinary, and that’s why he loves people watching on Sunday mornings at Central Park & the Manhattan Mall, where he extracts his in- spiration for his next experimental piece. Jesse has received national recogni- tion for such pieces and attained several awards for his choreographed pieces. He is also eager to work with fashion designers, chefs, and musicians to create cutting edge events that are ahead of their time. He can’t wait to offer fashion input for performance pieces and coordinated events. Jesse feels like this is the kind of exciting and invigorating experience he’s been seeking to kick start the next chapter in his choreography career and looks forward to forging new friendships and expanding his artistic vision. He is also eager to mentor fellow dancers as he once benefited from support be- fore his career successfully launched. He believes in Surge’s vision and is also excited to experience the San Franciscan culture during his six-month visit. Skye is an Indie folk singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from Min- nesota that’s been experimenting with some rock sounds as well. A dare devil with colors & sounds, she enjoys nothing more than explor- ing life with her music, words and instruments which include a lime green Acoustic guitar, harmonica & a Banjo. Skye recently adopted a kitten & named her Bizarre, after her favorite word & vibe. She can barely keep up with her so she takes her to her mom to take care of her. Skye performs every Wednesday, Friday & Sunday at local Mic nights but this is not nearly enough for her to express herself with creative satis- faction- she craves much more. After submitting her demos to Surge, she was accepted into the Artists in Mentorship program and looks forward to a challenging and rewarding experience in a supportive and innovative atmosphere with a collection of diverse minds. She shared the news with her kitten, which continued to play hard to get. Skye hopes that this experience will bring attention to her individual talent and help her gain an understanding of the national artistic community. With the help of her mom, she’s saved up enough to rent a small room in SOMA but is grateful that Surge’s program offers her such a valuable experience based on only her talent and hard work and does not require payment. Skye looks forward to being financially dependent on her Artistic craft one day & playing for much larger audiences. Emerging Professional Artist/ Skye Mcleod Surge primarily supports emerging artists seeking growth and mentorship from estab- lished professional artists. We also feature established art professionals, who seek an innovative approach to collaboration and want to engage with fellow impassioned artists of other disciplines, as well as, their community. Our center also attracts local student artists, city dwellers, art enthusiasts and artist recruiters seeking a space and source for communal artistry and creative exchange. These people seek out inventiveness and opportunities to enjoy a great book and coffee, or a progressive performance. Surge is a tourist hub within the city, where visitors enjoy an authentic San Franciscan experience in the form of a lunch, perfor- ANALYSIS/USERS’ BIOS
  • 15. 28 An aspiring traveler and AAU jewlery design graduate student, Kirsten adores bubble tea and creates her own mixes each and every time she orders, which confuses cashiers regularly. She loves creating handmade jewelry and sells it on Etsy, where custom orders are most welcome! She loves to keep her apartment clean but her roommates are madly messy, so she prefers to spend more time studying outside her place. Kirsten also loves watching dance and music performances with her friends at Surge’s Vanguard forum. She’s excited to see the risks each new collection of performers take together and how the expressive unison of artistry across disciplines comes alive in each presentation of talent. On Mondays & Wednesdays, she stops by to do some work sketchesv at the Nexus Cafe, equipped with a cup of organic fair trade coffee. On most Fridays, she loves stopping by for an organic smoothie & Open Mic Night, Jerry & Molly Clarkson are a couple of oddballs living in the funky city that is Berkley, where their quirkiness is thoroughly indulged. Molly is an aspiring boxer, hard-working nerd, music enthusiast & random dancer and singer, in no particular order. Jerry is a Super Mario Brothers Master and plays his Nintendo in between camping, hiking, and rock climbing. By day, however, Molly is a Jr. web analyst at Twitter & Jerry works for PG&E as a n environemntal biologist They both love Karaoke nights at the local Pub, where they meet fellow oddballs galore and are equally obsessed with kimchee and samosas. They also believe in eccentricity and full disclosure. Jerry & Molly love visiting Surge’s cocktail night at the Fruitious gallery where Molly covets every piece of clothing and, on a few Saturday evenings in the Spring, where they love outdoor drinks with their mates on the rooftop at the Fuisine restaurant lounge. They try to make it every couple of months when Surge features collaborative events at the Vanguard forum. They absolutely love the vibe of the whole place- it lends itself to a wide reach of personas and stylistic tones, which they eat right up and find very refreshing! Local Student/Working Artist/ Kristen Lepore Diverse Locals/ Molly & Jerry ANALYSIS/USERS’ BIOS
  • 16. 30 Jada is a free-spirited, tree-hugging, critter loving third-grade teacher in Southern California, who simply loves to laugh. Jada loves to travel, especially to San Francisco to visit her friend, Sarah. Recently, Sarah and Jada went on a backpacking trip through Southern France to check out all the holes in the walls that tourists avoid. When Jada visits San Francisco, she and Sarah always go to the Japanese Tea Garden at Golden Gate Park and then hit the Fusine restaurant lounge for dinner. They love the views, and design. Sometimes, Jada brings her sister, Jaden, along, which is like her shadow but Jada secretly eats this right up. Jada also secretly enjoyes cotton candy, sand in her shoes and wishes to one day have a masquerade party…perhaps she will talk to the Surge staff into hosting on`e sometime. Talent Recruiter/ Angela YeungTourist/Jada Oliver Angela loves a night out on the town, especially if it involves her babbling coworkers. She kisses her crazy dog on the mouth and wears street fashion beautifully. Coloring with her niece is one of Angela’s favorite activities, next to drinking her morning java, several times throughout the day. Angela is a talent recruiter from Boston and frequents visits to Southern and Northern California to scout out dancers and musicians. Since flying is a breeze for her, enjoys the experience of meeting new people and the process of exploring the arts. Angela has just recently gotten into gourmet cooking for her friends and neighbors and has just invested in a copper pan set, which she prefers to use for décor, hanging in the ceiling. It’s always her preference and pleasure, however, to enjoy gourmet fusion cuisine at Surge, paired with the amazing performances and fashion shows the Vanguard features often. In fact, she looks forward to it everytime she is in the city. These biographies are fictional. ANALYSIS/USERS’ BIOS
  • 17. 32 THE CITY San Francisco attracts people from all over the world, often called “the New York of the West,” and the “City of Art,” it is a diverse concoction of souls and voices. This small, yet populated, forty-nine square mile city thrives with persistent energy, artistic fervor, and stirs with cultural flavor, including artists seeking an avenue for creative development. San Francisco’s infrastructure holds as many historical momentums as the layers of paint that coat it. The buildings lining the city streets both transcend and manifest time; they are sacred monuments, carrying forward tradition. NEIGHBORHOODS The South of Market District (SoMa) and its neighboring Financial District, Downtown Union Square, Civic Center, Mission and Design neighborhoods all offer a tremendously diverse collection of varying venues and establish- ments that lend to a truly eclectic, creative and vibrant community persona, as unique as each individual within it. Downtown’s Financial District is the city’s central business neighborhood, populated with corporate headquarters, law firms, insurance companies, real estate firms, banks and other financial institutions. The Downtown Union Square is central to the city’s energy, busy with flurries of active shoppers, consumers, and business people. This area is a premier shopping district with of one of the largest collections of upscale boutiques, department stores, gift shops and beauty salons across the country. Downtown Civic Center hosts man of the city’s largest government and cultural institu- tions, including Civic Center and the United Nation’s Plaza, as well as several neo-classical architectural buildings, and an increasingly growing population of aspirin art innovators. The Mission District is known as home to the young urban professional and has been slowly reinventing itself to own an edgy and artful persona, a welcomed transition. It’s thriving performance and fine arts history solidifies its current venues of galleries and theatres, includ- ing Project Artaud and Arc Studios & Gallery. The Design District is home to the nationally acclaimed San Francisco Design Center, other interior design showrooms, photography and art galleries, renowned culinary gems and industrial and office spaces. SOUTH OF MARKET SOMA is populated with art schools, museums, hotels, eateries, loft and art spaces, upscale fashion shops, showrooms, condos, and technology companies. SOMA’s artistic neighbors include the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Moscone Center, and SOMArts Cultural Center, and the Academy of Art University. Surge is pleased to contribute to the neighborhood’s art culture and city, at large. This neighborhood bustles with students and working artists who are struggling to maintain a foothold in an increasingly financially and tech- nologically evolving community. Its Financial District neighbor houses expansion-seeking residents, eager to redevelop SOMA. Due to its close proximity to the Financial District and other qualities, SOMA is prime real estate on the edge of both gentrification and inevitable revitalization. Surge aims to use this for the advantage the SOMA community, providing it with opportunities to grow with and for its inhabitants, making the art center the ideal project type to meet the neighbor- hood’s needs. We hope to continue as an inspirational beacon and focal attraction for existing, neigh- boring and visiting community to network and flourish. ANALYSIS/SITE
  • 18. 34 SOMA DEMOGRAPHICS Total Population Males Females Avg. Age Total Households Households w/ Children Partner Living Arrangement Single Living Arrangement Density (persons/sq. mi.) 43,700 25,470 18,230 38.92 21,579 3,479 19,456 28,130 32,982 SOMA CLIMATE Avg. High in January Avg. Low in January Avg. High in July Avg. Low in July Avg. Sunny Days/Yr. 58.1 ° F 46.4 ° F 68.2 ° F 54.4 ° F 259 19.7 in. SOMA SOCEOECONOMICS Avg. Household Income High School Diploma Post-Secondary Degree White Collar $111,296 5,191 20,038 36,708 Cultural 13% Retail 16% Tourism 2% Production, Distribution, Repair 38% Management, Information, Professional Services 31% SoMa's Occupation Types 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Percent Growth Since 1990 Percent Growth Since 2000 SoMa's Population Growth SOMA ATTRACTIONS 1 South Van Ness Ave Muni Stop Civic Center/UN Plaza BART Academy of Art University SF Art Institute Art Institute of CA, SF CA College of the Arts SF Modern Museum of Art (SF MOMA) Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Museum of the African Diaspora Cartoon Art Museum Children’s Museum o.6 mi. 0.3 mi. 0.9 mi. 0.9 mi. 1.2 mi. 0.9 mi. 0.8 mi. 0.7 mi. 0.8 mi. 0.7 mi. 0.8 mi. CITY DEMOGRAPHICS San Francisco’s historical context and contemporary diversity, gives it the ability to develop on a path of holistic dimension that seeks to attract, support and foster the best talent, while also supporting its existing locals to thrive. Surge is adamant about uni- fying the technological and artistic geniuses of our time as a mutually advancing and benefiting resident base for our city. There is no need for them to live exclusively from or drive one another out. In fact, we be- lieve that both communities make quite the mutually successful cohabitants, driving San Francisco forward and upward. In turn, this makes our city a stronger attraction for both tourists, as well. ANALYSIS/BUILDING
  • 19. 36 Situated in SOMA’s mid-market, the Butcher Building is a historical cotton factory at 1161 Mission Street, between 7th and 8th Streets, across the street from the SoMa Grand on the Northside of Mission Street. Just a few doors down, sustainable structures are being built, such as the San Francisco Federal Building. This building is a severely constricting, column matrix and spatial conundrum. Its hallways are extremely narrow and very claustrophobic. Although the building is historical, it really does not have historical architectural context and is virtually a blank canvas. While the penthouse and one firm’s office are well decorated, the rest of the building is a mix of cluttered offices and underdeveloped abandonment of barren concrete without code-updated egress or ADA accessibility, save the restrooms. ANALYSIS/BUILDING
  • 20. 38 A B C D 23'-3" 23'-6" 23'-3" 75' Basement -11'-6" Level 1 ±0" Level 2 +10'-6" Level 3 +20'-6" Level 4 +35'-3" Level 5 +49' Penthouse +64' 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 160' 14'-3" 14'-3"15'-1" TYP Basement -11'-6" Level 1 ±0" Level 2 +10'-6" Level 3 +20'-6" Level 4 +35'-3" Level 5 +49' Penthouse +64' SPECS Year Built: 1926 Zoning: B-1, A-2 (Office/Assembly) Levels: 5, plus Basement & Penthouse Footprint Dimensions: 75’ x 160’ Footprint SQFT: 12,038 SQFT Total Space: 74,000 SQFT Total Occupied: 37, 692 SQFT Total Vacated: 36,308 SQFT Rooftop: 360 Views & Potential Deck Ceiling Heights: 8’-10”-12’3” ADA: Minimally accessible. Egress: None. Exterior: Finished concrete & colonial grid windows. SOUTHEAST SECTION/NTS SOUTHWEST SECTION/NTS ANALYSIS/BUILDING
  • 21. 40 EXISTING PLANS/NTS ANALYSIS/BUILDING
  • 22. 42 SCOPE PROGRAM PLANS STRUCTURAL
  • 23. 44 SCOPE/PROGRAM SPECS Year Renovated: 2015 Zoning: B, A-2, A-3 (Business/Assembly) Levels: 5, plus Basement & Rooftop Footprint Dimensions: 75’ x 160’ Footprint SQFT: 12,038 SQFT Total Space: 79,208 SQFT Total Occupied: 37, 692 SQFT Rooftop: 360 View Terrace Lounge Ceiling Heights: 8’-10”-26’ ADA: Fully accessible. Egress: 2 full means of egress. Exterior: Finished concrete & glass curtain wall -11'-6" -1 Basement ±0" 1 Level 1 +10'-6" 2 Level 2 +20'-6" 3 Level 3 +35'-3" 4 Level 4 +49' 5 Level 5 +64' 6 Rooftop LEVEL SPACE CLASS OCCUPANCY LOAD NET N:G RATIO GROSS CIRC GUEST LOBBY A-3 9 25 235 1.25 298 25% GREEN ROOM A-3 30 25 745 1.25 935 25% CONTROL ROOM A-3 6 125 745 2 1494 100% MUSIC RECORDING STUDIO A-3 46 50 2295 1.7 3906 70% ISOLATION BOOTHS A-3 18 30 543 1.5 819 50% MUSIC REHEARSAL ROOMS A-3 20 30 609 1.5 918 50% DANCE STUDIO A-3 12 125 1497 2 2998 100% IT OFFICE B 1 100 121 1.5 186 50% LOCKERS S 1 75 100 1.4 155 40% TOTAL N/A 146 N/A 7108 N/A 12038 N/A LOBBY A-3 116 25 2894 1.25 3588 25% GALLERY B 33 60 1973 1.3 2536 30% CAFÉ A-2 105 25 2634 1.4 3659 40% KITCHEN/BOH A-2 8 200 1523 1.5 2256 50% TOTAL N/A 262 N/A 9024 N/A 12038 N/A VIEWING LOBBY A-3 25 25 635 1.25 755 25% DANCE STUDIO A-3 28 125 3513 1.6 5581 60% FASHION & COSTUME STUDIO A-3 25 120 2942 1.5 4374 50% GUEST CONFERENCE ROOMS A-3 13 75 978 1.4 1328 40% TOTAL N/A 91 N/A 8068 N/A 12038 N/A OFFICES B 16 100 1578 1.5 2447 50% INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP A-3 55 50 2769 1.5 4234 50% ARTISTS' LOUNGE A-2 22 75 1615 1.5 2503 50% STAFF BREAKROOM A-2 30 40 1181 1.4 1733 40% WOMEN'S LOCKER ROOMS A-3 4 90 337 1.5 586 50% MEN'S LOCKER ROOMS A-3 3 90 304 1.5 536 50% TOTAL N/A 129 N/A 7784 N/A 12038 N/A LOBBY A-3 68 25 1707 1.25 2211 25% MULTIPURPOSE EVENT FORUM A-3 194 25 4853 1.3 6386 30% FORUM BACKSTAGE A-3 24 75 1829 1.5 2821 50% TOTAL N/A 290 N/A 8740 N/A 12038 N/A VIEWING BALCONY A-3 80 30 2403 1.5 3841 50% CULINARY PREP KITCHEN/BOH A-2 9.675 200 1935 1.5 3140 50% TOTAL N/A 90 N/A 4338 N/A 6980 N/A RESTAURANT A-2 142 25 3551 1.4 4972 40% TERRACE LOUNGE A-2 103 25 2583 1.45 3737 45% CULINARY SERVICE KITCHEN/BOH A-2 12 200 2303 1.45 3328 45% TOTAL N/A 257 N/A 8437 N/A 12038 N/A ROOFTOP BASEMENT ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE A symbol of a collective and progressive artistic iden- tity, Surge stands in the heart of SOMA as a clean and modern voice in the city masses. In approaching the repurposing and redesigning process of this dynamic center, Surge approached several large challenges and began the programming and space planning with two major focus elements. These focus elements began with identifying the spa- tial needs of the center’s users, as well as defining the exact egress and circulation requirements. From there, Surge examined the spatial proximal associations of each discipline and functional purpose, taking into account daylighting, views, and accessibility. Finally, working with a constricting column matrix was the ma- jor challenge to creating spatial flow and a dynamic interconnected building with sculptural aesthetic and functional ease. Fully accessible and up to code, it features open concept design with increased circulation and inven- tive use of columns for both function and aesthetic. Surge utilizes the preexisting rooftop and empty basement floors to maximize on valuable real estate, views and space for its community of artists and guests. NORTHWEST ELEVATION/NTS
  • 24. 46 CAVENOUS MUSIC STUDIO NEXUS CAFE DANCE STUDIO FASHION STUDIO NUCLEUS WORKSHOP NUCLEUS ARTISTS' LOUNGE STAFF BREAKROOM VANGUARD FORUM LOBBY VANGUARD FORUM FUSINE KITCHEN FORUM BACKSTAGE FUSINE RESTAURANT & LOUNG EGRESS RESTROOMSBasement -11'-6" Level 1 ±0" Level 2 +10'-6" Level 3 +20'-6" Level 4 +35'-3" Level 5 +49' Rooftop +64' SOUTHWEST SECTION (1) SCOPE/PROGRAM CAVENOUS DANCE STUDIO CAVENOUS GREENRM & LOUNGE SURGE LOBBY FRUITIOUS GALLERY VIEWING LOUNGE GUEST CONFERENCE OFFICES VANGUARD FORUM & BALCONY VANGUARD LOBBY & BALCONY FUSINE RESTAURANT EGRESS RESTROOMSBasement -11'-6" Level 1 ±0" Level 2 +10'-6" Level 3 +20'-6" Level 4 +35'-3" Level 5 +49' Rooftop +64' 1 NORTHEAST SECTION (1) 1/16" = 1'-0" SOUTHWEST SECTION/NTS NORTHEAST SECTION/NTS
  • 25. 48 SCOPE/PLANS 11' TYP 17'-2" TYP 89'-1" 8'-5" TYP 9'-10" TYP 20'-2" TYP 6'-8"7'-6" 4' 32'-11"15'11'-7"TYP13'-1"TYP 22'-4"18'-11"TYP 5'-7"3'-4" 118'-4" 39'-10" 6 SURGE LOBBY FRUITIOUS GALLERY NEXUS CAFE 1 MAIN ENTRANCE 2 LOBBY 3 CAFE ENTRANCE 4 GALLERY 5 CAFE 6 KITCHEN/BOH 7 RESTROOMS 8 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 9 SERVICE ELEVATOR 10 EAGRESS STAIRS 7 11 11 4 5 10 9 3 21 1st Floor (2) 1" = 20' 17'-2" 35'-7" 54' 15'-6"14'8'9'-10" 16'-10" 23'-11" 72'-3" 21'-2" 21'-7" 16'-6"15'-10"22'-8" CAVENOUS MUSIC & DANCE STUDIOS 1 GUEST LOBBY 2 GREENROOM 3 CONTROL ROOM 4 MUSIC RECORDING STUDIO 5 ISOLATION BOOTHS 6 MUSIC REHEARSAL ROOMS 7 DANCE STUDIO 8 IT OFFICE 9 LOCKERS 10 STORAGE 11 BUILDING MECHANICAL 12 RESTROOMS 13 JANITORIAL CLOSET 14 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 15 SERVICE ELEVATOR 16 EGRESS STAIRS 1 2 3 5 5 4 15 16 8 10 11 6 9 6 6 15 14 127 1 Basement (8) 1" = LEVEL 1 FLOOR PLAN/NTS BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN/NTS
  • 26. 50 37'-6"10'-6" 79'-11" 78'-2" 37'-9"16'-6" 50' 19'-4" TYP VIEWING LOBBY FASHION + COSTUME STUDIO DANCE STUDIO GUEST CONFERENCE 1 VIEWING LOBBY 2 DANCE STUDIO 3 FASHION & COSTUME STUDIO 4 GUEST CONFERENCE ROOMS 5 RESTROOMS 6 JANITORIAL CLOSET 7 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 8 SERVICE ELEVATOR 9 EAGRESS STAIRS 4 9 10 8 7 1 2 4 3 5 2nd Floor (2) 1:243.0 61'-2" 13'-9" 54'-3" 80' 9' 5'-4" 33'-5" 30'-5" 38'-8"8'-6" OFFICES NUCLEUS WORKHUB NUCLEUS LOUNGE STAFF BREAK ROOM LOCKER ROOMS 1 MEMBERSHIP 2 ADMIN 3 MENTORS 4 INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP 5 ARTISTS' LOUNGE 6 STAFF BREAKROOM 7 MEN'S LOCKER ROOMS 8 WOMEN'S LOCKER ROOMS 9 RESTROOMS 10 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 11 SERVICE ELEVATOR 12 EAGRESS STAIRS 4 2 3 13 13 12 11 78 6 5 1 9 9 3rd Floor (2) 1:243.0 NUCLEUS WORKHUB & LOUNGE 1 WORKHUB ENTRANCE 2 LOUNGE ENTRANCE 3 THINK TANKS 4 GROUP SEATING 5 ARTISTS' LOUNGE 1 2 3 4 5 LEVEL 3 FLOOR PLAN/NTSLEVEL 2 FLOOR PLAN/NTS SCOPE/PLANS
  • 27. 52 48'6'-3" 32'-7" 70'-2" 6' 49'-5" 32'-8"14'-10" 10'-10" 59'-6" 4' TYP 13'-9" UP VANGUARD FORUM VANGUARD LOBBY VANGUARD BACKSTAGE 1 LOBBY 2 MULTIPURPOSE EVENT FORUM 3 FORUM BACKSTAGE 4 STORAGE 5 RESTROOMS 6 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 7 SERVICE ELEVATOR 8 EAGRESS STAIRS 2 9 3 9 854 1 7 4th Floor (2) 1:243.04 48'-1"6'-3" 10'-10" 78'-3" 32'-7" 70' 1' 54'-6" 7 7 6 5 3 1 2 1 VANGUARD BALCONY FUSINE PREP KITCHEN 1 VIEWING BALCONY 2 CULINARY PREP KITCHEN/BOH 3 RESTROOMS 4 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 5 SERVICE ELEVATOR 6 EAGRESS STAIRS OPEN TO BELOW OPEN TO BELOW 5th Floor (2) 1:243.0 LEVEL 4 FLOOR PLAN/NTS LEVEL 5 FLOOR PLAN/NTS SCOPE/PLANS
  • 28. 54 33'-6"2'18'-10" 37'-6"10'-6" 79' 17'-4" 61'-5" 11' 5'-2" 50'-2" 22'-9" FUSINE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE FUSINE KITCHEN 1 RECEPTION 2 RESTAURANT 3 TERRACE LOUNGE 4 CULINARY SERVICE KITCHEN/BOH 5 RESTROOMS 6 PUBLIC ELEVATORS 7 SERVICE ELEVATOR 8 EAGRESS STAIRS 3 2 9 4 9 8 7 5 1 SCOPE/PLANS /STRUCTURAL SECOND FLR FIRST FLR BASEMENT ROOFTOP COLUMN (TYP) HSS 12 X 12 X 1/2" BEAMS WITH ENGINEERED CONNECTIONS HSS H14 BEAMS WITH ENGINEERED CONNECTIONS, ANTI-BUCKLE SUPPORTS AESTHETIC COVER (TYP) GRADE SLAB (TYP) FOURTH FLR THIRD FLR GSEducationalVersion 26' 1' 7" 3'-6" 2'-11"3'-2" 8' 1 SOUTHEAST INTERIOR ELEVATION 3/32" = 1'-0" The repurposing of the Butcher Building required an allowance to feasibly sculpt the building, with minimal structural adjustment. Surge submitting the building’s existing, as well as, proposed building plans to a struc- tural engineer for expert analysis and recommenda- tions on the limits of building modifications. The recommendations disallowed the removal of any set of columns from basement to rooftop or any columns from the corners or outside walls. Structural repurposing allowed for up to twelve columns in rect- angular formation (five bays) on two floors , inclusive, to the roof, to be removed. This could not be done on consecutive floors, namely, for example, floors 2 and 4 or 3 and 5. The removal of the slab that coincides with these twelve columns was permitted to be removed. In order for these columns and associated slab to be successfully removed, the skeletal structure required additional lateral supports. Wherein a single column is removed, the slab above requires support by installing a HSS square cross-section beams or greater, in span, with engineered connec- tions. Where columns and adjacent slab are required to be removed, the same installation must be applied. In addition, the columns around and above the open floor were required to feature vertical HSS, H14 or greater, anti-buckle braces, engineered with end con- nections, one floor above and below. These could be installed on to the outer columns and can be covered for esthetics. Surge has been designed to feature a multi-purpose forum by removing 11 of the 12 permissible columns, above and below the level four slab. The center’s design added angled bracing to the beam in span to further support the above floor structures and aestheti- cally enhance the space. LEVEL 5 FLOOR PLAN/NTS SOUTHEAST INTERIOR ELEVATION/NTSSTRUCTURAL ALLOWANCE/NTS
  • 29. 56 spaces SURGE I LOBBY NEXUS I CAFE FRUITIOUS I GALLERY CAVENOUS I MUSIC STUDIOS NUCLEUS I WORK HUB THE VANGUARD I FORUM FUSINE I RESTAURANT LOUNGE
  • 30. 58 Fascia is a specialized system of densely woven, thin yet incredibly strong connective tissue envelops, supports, connects, separates, and protects each and every muscle, bone, organ, nerve and vessel in the body, allowing it to experience full range of dynamic motion while providing directional support. Continuous, inward pulling tensional network that brings centrality and draws together all functioning members of the body. A singular, uninterrupted, yet multi-faceted, collagenous, fibrous, extra-cellular matrix structure. To gain optimum flexibility and strength, capability and perfor- mance, three-dimensional movements involve inward/outward rotational combinations. SURGE LOBBY, FRUITIOUS GALLERY & NEXUS CAFE 1 MAIN ENTRANCE 2 CAFE ENTRANCE 3 MAIN LOBBY 4 LOBBY SEATS 5 FRONT DESK 6 CAFE COUNTER 7 BANQUETTES 8 CAFE LOUNGE 9 CAFE BAR 10 CAFE PAIRS 11 OPEN STAGE 12 FEATURE DISPLAY 13 SHELVING DISPLAY 14 GALLERY HOST 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 4 2 11 12 13 14 INTERIORS/SURGE LOBBY
  • 31. LOBBY
  • 32. 64 Every body part is inextricably connected to every other part. SURGE LOBBY, FRUITIOUS GALLERY & NEXUS CAFE 1 MAIN ENTRANCE 2 CAFE ENTRANCE 3 MAIN LOBBY 4 LOBBY SEATS 5 FRONT DESK 6 CAFE COUNTER 7 BANQUETTES 8 CAFE LOUNGE 9 CAFE BAR 10 CAFE PAIRS 11 OPEN STAGE 12 FEATURE DISPLAY 13 SHELVING DISPLAY 14 GALLERY HOST 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 4 2 11 12 13 14 INTERIORS/FRUITIOUS GALLERY
  • 33. FEATURE DISPLAY
  • 34. SHELVING/HOST
  • 35. 70 Acts as a unifying center, wherein cre- ative shifters and movers of our society, each with their unique perspectives, interweave paths to form a holistic, web- like whole, while also further defining their distinct role. SURGE LOBBY, FRUITIOUS GALLERY & NEXUS CAFE 1 MAIN ENTRANCE 2 CAFE ENTRANCE 3 MAIN LOBBY 4 LOBBY SEATS 5 FRONT DESK 6 CAFE COUNTER 7 BANQUETTES 8 CAFE LOUNGE 9 CAFE BAR 10 CAFE PAIRS 11 OPEN STAGE 12 FEATURE DISPLAY 13 SHELVING DISPLAY 14 GALLERY HOST 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10 4 2 11 12 13 14 INTERIORS/NEXUS CAFE
  • 36. COUNTER
  • 37. OPEN STAGE
  • 38. BAR, PAIRS
  • 39. LOUNGE/BANQUETTES
  • 40. 80 A single structure existing from head to toe. CAVENOUS MUSIC & DANCE STUDIOS 1 GUEST LOBBY 2 GREENROOM 3 CONTROL ROOM 4 MAIN RECORDING STUDIO 5 ISOLATION BOOTHS 6 DANCE STUDIO 1 2 3 6 5 6 5 INTERIORS/CAVENOUS MUSIC STUDIOS
  • 41. ENTRANCE
  • 42. GUEST LOBBY
  • 43. GREENROOM
  • 44. CONTROL
  • 45. STUDIO ENTRANCE
  • 46. STUDIO
  • 47. 94 Maintains equilibrium through a delicate balance of tension and elasticity; through three-dimensional movements toward optimal flexibility involve a juxtaposition of flexion/extension, and abduction/adduc- tion combinations. NUCLEUS WORKHUB & LOUNGE 1 WORKHUB ENTRANCE 2 LOUNGE ENTRANCE 3 THINK TANKS 4 GROUP SEATING 5 ARTISTS' LOUNGE 1 2 3 4 5 INTERIORS/NUCEUS WORK HUB & LOUNGE
  • 48. GROUP
  • 49. THINK TANKS
  • 50. ARTISTS’ LOUNGE
  • 51. 102 Facilitates equal exchange of multiple, uniquely functioning and integral elements. VANGUARD FORUM, LOBBY & BACKSTAGE 1 LOUNGE 2 COCKTAILS 3 BAR 4 FORUM ENTRANCE 5 NON-FIXED SEATING 6 NON-FIXED STAGE 7 HAIR + MAKEUP 8 DRESSING ROOMS 9 PROP + WARDROBE STORAGE 10 EQUIPMENT STORAGE 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 8 9 4 9 10 VANGUARD BALCONY 1 BALCONY ENTRANCE 2 VIEWING BALCONY 3 OPEN TO BELOW 1 2 3 9 3 INTERIORS/VANGUARD FORUM & LOBBY
  • 52. BALCONY/ENTRANCE
  • 53. COCKTAILS
  • 54. LOBBY LOUNGE
  • 55. LOUNGE BAR
  • 56. FORUM/BALCONY
  • 57. FORUM/STEPS
  • 58. 116 Many individual collagenous fibers weave, cleave, then fuse together to form a holistic, unified web-like structure. FUSINE RESTAURANT 1 RECEPTION/WAITING 2 LOUNGE 3 DINING 4 BAR 5 TERRACE ENTRANCE 6 INDOOR/OUTDOOR BAR 7 GROUP SWINGS 8 PAIR SWINGS 9 LOW SEATS 10 TALL SEATS 1 2 3 4 65 78 9 10 INTERIORS/FUSINE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
  • 59. HOST
  • 60. INDOOR/OUTDOOR BAR
  • 61. LOUNGE
  • 62. SWINGS/GROUP
  • 63. SWINGS/PAIRS
  • 64. LOW SEATS
  • 65. TALL SEATS
  • 66. 132 DESIGN/ER PRINT SOURCES BIO RESUME CREDITS To create one’s own world in the arts takes courage. GEORGIE O’KEEFE
  • 67. 134 Rising to the occasion, Surge has been recently erected amongst its fellow establishments with a pro- fessional mission to support local talent, as well as, attract and host national talent through an approach of merging experimenting artists across varying skill levels, through its six month mentorship program. Surge has become a symbol of an ever-present and fervently evolving artistic community, voice and per- spective within SoMa. Through its multiple dance, musical, culinary, and fashion events, it supports a growing trend of a collaborative art society, serving performance, trade and visual artists alike. Surge has provided a sort of creative hub toward which artistic wanderers have gravitated in search of their personal niche- and find it, they have. An eclectic assemblage of Academy of Art students, aspiring young graduate artists, and men- torship members bustle inside the building’s “fascia-inspired building.” Modeled from a mindfully global perspective, Surge draws upon the influence of the Amstel Institute, Amsterdam, a building with graphic finesse, composed of a distinctive set of spatial sequences. Similarly, Surge’s completely renovated interi- or, which is designed to transcend the essence of the interwoven web- like structure of the human body’s connective tissue, evokes a true sense of collaboration amongst its inhabitants, centralizing and unify- ing them at the Center’s numerous spaces throughout its volume. Surge aims to extend this sense of comrad- ery outside the building, represent- ing also the relationship between itself and its neighboring art scenes as well as the hopeful development of a coexisting future of the art and technology worlds within SoMa. Visionaries, who seek the coexis- tence of both San Francisco’s artistic, as well as, technological industries in neighborhoods like SoMa, argue that the City’s future depends on the survival of both, and that it will surely thrive on their dual presence. Jerry and Molly Clarkson are two such folk who speak of SoMa as a uniquely culture-rich amalgamation of right and left-brainers. Molly, a Jr. Web Analyst at Twitter, and Jerry, an Environmental Biologist at PG&E, love the experience of such a com- munity, “homogeny is an absolute bore,” Jerry explains, as Molly en- thusiastically pipes in, “You couldn’t possibly ask for a better socially and economically vibrant combination!” “These kinds of spaces must be here, they belong here…it’s what this City is all about. I think it can even be said that this is a big part of why we techies are even in this neighborhood in the first place,” says an assured Molly, while sipping on her Organic juice blend at CIIMA’s Fused Bistro. Within the context of San Fran- cisco and the Bay Area at large, SoMa is a nexus of art, business, culture, government and technology. Because of this immense diversity of its population, this neighbor- hood can continue toward a bright and promising future by moving along the path of full integration and co-habitation of both the tech- nologically and artistically savvy. 01 San Francisco district map 02 SFMOMA, a SoMa hallmark 03 SoMa District 04 Art students in SoMa 05 Jerry & Molly Clarkson, Bay area residents ISSUE 62  133 issue 70. volume 7 DECEMBER 2013 REPORT Art in a Technological City CREATIVE FOOT- HOLD San Francisco Preface In a city known for its technological ad- vancement and thriving economy, art is restoring its presence for a balanced coex- istence in the heart of a rapidly populating neighborhood, the South of Market district. WRITER Nancy Farage PHOTOGRAPHER The World Wide Web 132  ISSUE 62 At the northernmost point of California’s Bay area peninsula, San Francisco stands as an eclectic emblem of culture, bustling with tech-minded and business individu- als, design & art students, struggling artists and design professionals. An attraction for brilliant young minds, with a far and long historical relationship with art, the city’s reputation for such creativity has slowly been etched over in the rise of the techno- logical age, by a large wave of eager young Web startups and techies. North of the infamous Silicon Valley, San Francisco’s stature in the world of technology has been securely established, and physically, companies are opting for the City over the Valley in order to claim cheaper office space, and reside amidst cosmopolitan fervor in order to attract urban-dwelling tal- ent that does not want to commute to their companies’ Valley headquarters. The door into city location for these new companies was opened at the mark of the United States’ financial crisis and real estate market decline. Recently, Sili- con Valley has been described by ven- ture capitalist Vinod Khosla as “a state of mind, rather than a geographical place.” Smaller companies are clustering them- selves around big names like Twitter, Yelp and Google in the Financial and Mission Districts and are increasingly claiming space in neighboring districts, like Union Square and the South of Market Districts. Particularly in a prime and prox- imal location to the city is the South of Market District -coined as SoMa- a one- time industrial, turned artistic hub, and tech-central in the making, due to firms and large retailers arriving or staying and even expanding over the span of the last decade. In fact, Twitter and Yelp are just beyond the Southern cusp of SoMa, and so this in combination with Pinterest, and Zynga’s arrival in SoMa is inciting definitive presence in the neighborhood’s industrialized architecture and exposed ceiling interiors by appreciative tech pro- fessionalsseekingacharacteristicphysical environment in the workplace. Undoubt- edly, reputable companies have played a significant role in revitalizing the city’s districts, attracting and thereby encour- aging many sprouting hotels, restaurants, gourmet coffee shops and entertain- ment venues in newly renovated spaces. While internet commerce is bringing positive change to the SoMa neighborhood, wherein certain enclaves were once sorely avoided by tourists, and business and tech em- ployees with trepidation, the community’s art- ists are struggling for a foothold in the district’s real estate. Thus, SoMa’s gentrification process has proven to be a downfall for SoMa’s Artis- tic community, whose longstanding presence is being challenged. An increasing number of artists are in need of and heavily leaning on art institutions within SoMa to offer them spaces to create, perform, and display their art. For the visual arts, numerous galleries and art stu- dios collaborate in an annual Fall/Winter SF Open Studios event, displaying local creative works through ArtSpan. Serving the commu- nity’s needs for visual and performance arts, the YBCA continues its services year-round. With a reputation as a center to the City’s art culture for distinguished interna- tional Art establishments, SoMa houses a mu- seum district, cultural and art centers, exhibi- tions, galleries and performance centers, chief among them are the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, (SFMOMA), and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA). These in- stitutions offer an irreplaceable trademark of the neighborhood’s, and moreover, the City’s identity as an Artistic destination for creative industries. With the fact that San Francisco’s number one economic generator remains tour- ism, its cultural attraction is a direct source for this and proves to be equally vital. For this reason, San Francisco’s ability to offer its art- ists education, housing and jobs has produced a stable revenue contribution for the city. It appears that although seemingly in opposi- tion, the artistic atmosphere fuels the interests of tech employees who seek San Francisco for its unique cultural character. Yet, while these culturally central spaces offer a remarkable cultural capital for the district, SoMa’s yearn- ing for a unique emblem of its diverse body of artists to represent it in an unconventional and informal needed approach, needed to be met. Moreover, this body of establishments needs to continue growing and solidifying its pres- ence in the city’s most artistic neighborhood. 01 02 03 04 05 issue 70. volume 7 DECEMBER 2013 REPORT Art in a Technological City CREATIVE FOOT- HOLD San Francisco Preface In a city known for its technological advancement and thriving economy, art is restoring its presence for a balanced coexistence in the heart of a rapidly populating neighborhood, the South of Market district. WRITER Nancy Farage PHOTOGRAPHER The World Wide Web 132  ISSUE 62 At the northernmost point of California’s Bay area peninsula, San Francisco stands as an eclectic emblem of culture, bustling with tech-minded and business individ- uals, design & art students, struggling artists and design professionals. An attraction for brilliant young minds, with a far and long historical relationship with art, the city’s reputation for such creativity has slowly been etched over in the rise of the technological age, by a large wave of eager young Web startups and techies. North of the infamous Silicon Valley, San Francisco’s stature in the world of tech- nology has been securely established, and physically, companies are opting for the City over the Valley in order to claim cheaper office space, and reside amidst cosmopoli- tan fervor in order to attract urban-dwell- ing talent that does not want to commute to their companies’ Valley headquarters. The door into city location for these new companies was opened at the mark of the United States’ financial crisis and real estate market decline. Recently, Silicon Valley has been described by venture capitalist Vinod Khosla as “a state of mind, rather than a geographical place.” Smaller companies are clustering themselves around big names like Twitter, Yelp and Google in the Financial and Mission Districts and are increasingly claim- ing space in neighboring districts, like Union Square and the South of Market Districts. Particularly in a prime and proximal loca- tion to the city is the South of Market Dis- trict -coined as SoMa- a onetime industrial, turned artistic hub, and tech-central in the making, due to firms and large retailers arriv- ing or staying and even expanding over the span of the last decade. In fact, Twitter and Yelp are just beyond the Southern cusp of SoMa, and so this in combination with Pin- terest, and Zynga’s arrival in SoMa is inciting definitive presence in the neighborhood’s in- dustrialized architecture and exposed ceiling interiors by appreciative tech professionals seeking a characteristic physical environment in the workplace. Undoubtedly, reputable companies have played a significant role in revitalizing the city’s districts, attracting and thereby encouraging many sprouting hotels, restaurants, gourmet coffee shops and enter- tainment venues in newly renovated spaces. While internet commerce is bringing pos- itive change to the SoMa neighborhood, wherein certain enclaves were once sorely avoided by tourists, and business and tech employees with trepidation, the communi- ty’s artists are struggling for a foothold in the district’s real estate. Thus, SoMa’s gen- trification process has proven to be a down- fall for SoMa’s Artistic community, whose longstanding presence is being challenged. An increasing number of artists are in need of and heavily leaning on art institutions within SoMa to offer them spaces to create, perform, and display their art. For the visual arts, numerous galleries and art studios col- laborate in an annual Fall/Winter SF Open Studios event, displaying local creative works through ArtSpan. Serving the community’s needs for visual and performance arts, the YBCA continues its services year-round. With a reputation as a center to the City’s art culture for distinguished international Art establishments, SoMa houses a muse- um district, cultural and art centers, exhi- bitions, galleries and performance centers, chief among them are the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, (SFMOMA), and the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA). These institutions offer an irre- placeable trademark of the neighborhood’s, and moreover, the City’s identity as an Ar- tistic destination for creative industries. With the fact that San Francisco’s number one economic generator remains tourism, its cultural attraction is a direct source for this and proves to be equally vital. For this rea- son, San Francisco’s ability to offer its artists education, housing and jobs has produced a stable revenue contribution for the city. It appears that although seemingly in op- position, the artistic atmosphere fuels the interests of tech employees who seek San Francisco for its unique cultural character. Yet, while these culturally central spaces of- fer a remarkable cultural capital for the dis- trict, SoMa’s yearning for a unique emblem of its diverse body of artists to represent it in an unconventional and informal need- ed approach, needed to be met. Moreover, this body of establishments needs to con- tinue growing and solidifying its presence This article is fictional. Guthrie, John Patten, Interior Designer’s Portable Hand- book, McGraw-Hill, 2012 Brownell, Blaine, Transmaterial, Princeton Architectural Press, 2006 Harmon, Sharon Koomen and Kennin, Kathrine, The Codes Guidebook for Interiors, John Wiley and Sons Inc. 2011 Ching, Francid D. K. and Winkel, Steven R., Building Codes Illustrated, John Wiley and Sons Inc. 2012 Karlen, Mark, Space Planning Basics, John Wiley and Sons Inc. 2009 Russell, Sage, The Architecture of Light, Conceptnine, , 2012 Neufert, Ernst and Peter, Neufert Architects’ Data, Black- well Publishing, 2012 Panero, Julius and Zelnik, Martin, Time-Saver Standards for Interior Design and Space Planning, 2nd Edition, Mc- Graww-Hill Education , 2001 Piotrowsk, Christine M, Professional Practice for Interior Designers, John Wiley and Sons Inc. 2014 Artspan Magazine Frame Magazine Workshop Magazine Interior Design Magazine Habitus Magazine Monocle Magazine archdaily.com headlands.org swatch-art-peace-hotel. com groupi.com rauschenbergfounda- tion.org cac.ca.gov arts.gov foundationforcontempo- raryarts.org cfda.com irvine.org houzz.com www.somersethouse. org.uk sfmuralarts.com/ art-collecting.com ybca.org sfbayareagalleryguide. com 941geary.com projectartaud.org somarts.org 826valencia.org thecrucible.org hennagarden.com colliers.com newmarkccarey.com sanfancisco.about.com travel.nytimes.com sf-planning.org homes.point2.org gaisma.com govexec.com ohashidesign.com edgemagonline.com clodagh.com resetsanfrancisco.org shift.jp.org tahtsmags.com contemporist.com thearchive.com modernarchitecturecon- cept.com hatchdesign.ca nida.edu.au fondazionemaxxi.it lightspace.tv stanprokopenko.com http://www.laboralcen- trodearte.org schoolofculinaryarts.org gsmd.ac.uk e-architect.com onassisusa.org a21studio.com.vn georgebrown.ca/ad conservatoire.gouv. qc.ca Blog.2modern.com BOOKS PRINT WEB DESIGN/PRINT /SOURCES
  • 68. 136 NANCY FARAGE 6599 Dublin Blvd Ste 408 Dublin, California 94568 1.206.407.7403 Nancy.Farage@gmail.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/Nacy-Farage/4a/3a9/111 nfarage.wix.com/designer EXPERIENCE Intern Michael Friedes Design Associates Project Management Assistance: FF&E Sourc- ing, Showcase Install, CAD Drawings, & Office Admin Support Oakland, California [2012] Interior Design Consultant Freelance Client-Based Residential Interior Design: Space Planning & FF&E Selection Lynnwood, Washington [2003-2011] Events Coordinator Freelance Planner & Coordinator for Diverse Events, In- cluding Celebratory, Fundraising, Ngo: Event Programming, Venue & Vendor Selection, Space Planning, & Custom Interior Decor Lynnwood, Washington [2002-2011] Surge’s designer, Nancy Farage, comes from an eclectic vantage point of multi-cultural diversity and multi-disciplinary education. She values the dynamics of hu- manity in every element of design, working tirelessly to create space worthy of nurtur- ing its users and their needs. Nancy loves people, animals and nature, with a primary preference for trees, chil- dren, and dogs. Many times, her inspiration comes from daily life and observed needs. An avid believer in color, vibrance, simplic- ity and thoughtful craft, she searches for holistic balance in every aspect of her life & design, valuing the arts of communica- tion and community. Nancy has intuitive senses which involve her mind in ever-active visions for the potential of all spaces and societies. She hopes that her designs contribute to the holistic health of individuals and communi- ties. PROFICIENCY Archicad, Autocad, 3Ds Max, Photoshop, Indesign, Illustrator, Word, Powerpoint, Excel Interior Design Process Site & Building Analysis, Programming & Space Planning, Concept & Design De- velopment, FF&E Selection, Presentations, Comunication Languages English: Native Arabic: Fluent PROFILE ASID Excellence Awards Organizational Involvement Galleria- Sf Design Center, California Volunteer, 2012 ASID: American Society Of Interior Designers San Francisco, California Member + Volunteer, 2012 IAD Club, vAcademy Of Art University School Involvement San Francisco, California Member, 2012 Andenet Community Television NGO Involvement Seattle, Washington Researcher + Supporter, 2006 EDUCATION Academy Of Art University San Francisco, California Graduate School Of Interior Architecture & Design Master Of Fine Arts Expected: July 2015 University Of Washington Bothell, Washington School Of Interdisciplinary Studies: Society, Ethics + Human Behavior Bachelor Of Arts Minor In Human Rights September 2005- December 2007 Edmonds Community College Edmonds, Washington Running Start & Associate Of Arts [September 2002- June 2005] DESIGNER/BIO, RESUME /RESUME
  • 69. 138 Art is creating something out of nothing. I owe all of my creativity to its giver, God. My art is empowered by the first & truly original Creator, who made all beauty from null, simply for us to enjoy. Thank you, Lord, for the blessed support of my husband, family & friends. DESIGNER/CREDITS

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