Aarjan Dixit
CARE International
15 April 2015, 3rd NAP EXPO
Considerations of gender
and vulnerable groups
Examples, lesso...
Differential vulnerability: The role of social incl. gender
dimensions
•Risks to climate related impacts: vulnerability, h...
Introducing CARE’s Community-based Adaptation
Tools www.careclimatechange.org/tools
Aims/ objectives
•Understanding local ...
Introducing CARE tools cont.
Processes
• Community-driven
• Institutional mapping, policy
analysis, key informants
• Inclu...
Findings from across the regions – underlying causes
of vulnerability
• Asset base: ability to be proactive and innovate /...
Lessons on social & gender dimensions of
vulnerability analysis
• Disaggregating vulnerability is not just about conductin...
Reflections for NAP
• Better targeting, timing and approaches of adaptation-related
interventions for climate-vulnerable s...
Questions to consider:
• What methods and tools have you found to be the most
useful for your country to address gender co...
Thank you!
www.careclimatechange.org
Bonn NAP Expo
14-15 April 2015
SebastienDUSABEYEZU
UNFCCC National Focal Point for Rwanda
Senior Environmental Analyst Off...
Main gaps and challenges
 Lack of gender references in the national NAPA;
 Insufficient baseline information and indicat...
Conclusion and recommendations
Gender GoR (Governmentof Rwanda) and partners should continueworking
hand in hand to ensure...
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NAP Expo 2015 Session VIII, I Care vulnerable groups

Considerations of gender and vulnerable groups by Aarjan Dixit, CARE International
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Environment      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NAP Expo 2015 Session VIII, I Care vulnerable groups

  • 1. Aarjan Dixit CARE International 15 April 2015, 3rd NAP EXPO Considerations of gender and vulnerable groups Examples, lessons and highlights from country experiences in using tools and methods
  • 2. Differential vulnerability: The role of social incl. gender dimensions •Risks to climate related impacts: vulnerability, hazards and exposure. The roles, responsibilities, voice, access, control ...  result of social relations a critical component • Different groups within a community have different but complementary knowledge, capacities, experience
  • 3. Introducing CARE’s Community-based Adaptation Tools www.careclimatechange.org/tools Aims/ objectives •Understanding local and differentiated impacts of climate change •Community level and –led analysis, planning and tracking •Bringing together locally held knowledge and climate info services •Reflective community process •Collaborative learning and dialogue between different actors Primary target audience •Project managers, field staff •Local partners •Communities April 15, 2015 2 These tools do NOT: • quantify results • provide results that can be generalised to national/regional levels
  • 4. Introducing CARE tools cont. Processes • Community-driven • Institutional mapping, policy analysis, key informants • Inclusive & empowering Linkages • ACCRA Local Adaptive Capacity • Livelihoods framework • Rights-based approaches • Gender and Diversity April 15, 2015 3 Field level tools e.g. • seasonal calendars • hazard maps • historical timeline, trend analysis • Venn diagram • vulnerability matrix, hazard & response analysis
  • 5. Findings from across the regions – underlying causes of vulnerability • Asset base: ability to be proactive and innovate / take risks requires minimum asset base  strong differences e.g. land tenure, livestock, credit • Exclusion/ lack of voice: ethnic minorities, younger generations, or poor, uneducated women lacking voice in decision-making on e.g. DRM, land use, development planning • Access to information and training: language, generation and gender gaps in access to crucial information (weather, early warning, markets..) • Labour division by gender group  differential exposure and sensitivity to climatic hazards depending on crops farmed,livelihoods activities, time use • Climatic shifts and social change: transitions in/ out of livelihoods, changes in labour division, erosion of community safety nets April 15, 2015 4
  • 6. Lessons on social & gender dimensions of vulnerability analysis • Disaggregating vulnerability is not just about conducting household level same-sex focus groups, nor about female- headed households versus everyone else– about evolution in equality gaps (control, rights, access, etc) • Poverty - vulnerability relationship needs renewed nuance– gender, age, disability, marginalization etc… • Cookbook fallacy around tools: lack of training, time, facilitation skills; • Trade-off: local custom vs. inclusion - time pressures, and local customs vs. inclusion of most excluded groups • Analysis “and then what?” Analysis needs follow-on tools  otherwise social dimension gets "lost in translation" April 15, 2015 5
  • 7. Reflections for NAP • Better targeting, timing and approaches of adaptation-related interventions for climate-vulnerable social groups • From local to nation: Large scale climate response budgets and timeframes versus inclusiveness, context specificity and sensitivity to local power relations • Dangers of generalisation–: how to utilise case studies without inappropriate generalisation • Information & knowledge filters at different levels/ in different sectors are as important as the assessment method itself • Chicken and egg problem of evidence and climate policy results frameworks- what needs to come first? April 15, 2015 6
  • 8. Questions to consider: • What methods and tools have you found to be the most useful for your country to address gender considerations and considerations about vulnerable groups in adaptation planning and implementation? • For each element of the NAP guidelines, which building blocks would particularly need to be undertaken with a gender lens to ensure adequate consideration of gender issues in the process to formulate and implement NAPs. April 15, 2015 7
  • 9. Thank you! www.careclimatechange.org
  • 10. Bonn NAP Expo 14-15 April 2015 SebastienDUSABEYEZU UNFCCC National Focal Point for Rwanda Senior Environmental Analyst Officer
  • 11. Main gaps and challenges  Lack of gender references in the national NAPA;  Insufficient baseline information and indicators on specific vulnerabilities and adaptation mesures;  Lack of disaggregated data at all levels;  Low level of stakeholder participation in NAPA development process especially departments in charge of gender and women empowerment The NAPA process was not decentralized to local structures and most vulnerable communities to consider their views;  Insufficient knowledge on the link between gender and adaptation to CC;  Issue of coordination, planning and monitoring/evaluation
  • 12. Conclusion and recommendations Gender GoR (Governmentof Rwanda) and partners should continueworking hand in hand to ensure effective integrationof gender in adaptation strategies, programs and projects. Role of youth: “Youth” is the half of the population. Women and youth are both involved in adaption activities, as the most vulnerable group but also the strength (Force) of the Nation. Recommendations:  Development baseline and vulnerability indicators;  Developmentof gender strategy for each key sector;  Developmentof short, medium and long term National Action Plans with attentionon specificitiesof involved groups and sectors;  Capacity building and advocacyon gender mainstreaming and increaseof coordination between sectors;  Increasing financing opportunities for women;  Increasing collaborationwith stakeholders; 

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