Strategic CollectionManagement through Statistical Analysis Stephanie H. Wical University of Wisconsin – Eau Clai...
Methodology• Identified academic libraries in Wisconsin using a directory maintained by Wisconsin Association of Academi...
Demographics of the GroupThe group included libraries in public andprivate colleges and universities, technicalcolleges, t...
Response Rate• 139 surveys distributed via e-mail• 62 completed survey responses• 28 completed phone interviews45% Respons...
Survey Question: What types of library electronicresources statistics--if any--do you currently collect? (Ch...
Survey Question: What measure or measures do youconsider when evaluating electronic resources in your library? (C...
A Comparison of Collected and Considered605040302010 Considered 0 ...
Searches, Sessions, Full Text Downloads and Turnaways NASIG 2012
Survey Question: How frequently do you consider your measure or measures? Never ...
Interview Question: Do you look at cost-per- use for electronic resources? No 32% ...
IP Addresses That Access ResourcesThis measure might be important down theroad as departments outside of the librarymight ...
Times Cited or Times CitingCollecting this type of information was not a highpriority for any of the librarians we talked ...
Scholarly Impact• Scholarly impact is not something one routinely tracks, but it is something that is valuable when cons...
Interview Question: What measure or measures do youconsider when evaluating electronic resources in your library? ...
Interview Question: Why do you use the measure or measures you use to evaluate electronic resources? 30% ...
Interview Question: Do you feel that the measure or measures you use are adequate or do you feel that they do not provide ...
People who were not satisfied with usage statistics indicated:• Not all of them are counter compliant.• Could alw...
Where one library may see value in a set ofstatistics, another library may need somethingmore. ---Schufreider & ...
Survey Question: What tool or tools do you use to gatherstatistics for evaluating electronic journals, databases and/or ...
Finding 66% are using Excel in addition to another tool N=61 ...
Survey Question: Are you able to compare statistics across vendors and platforms? Other ...
Survey Question: Have you taken advantage of theStandardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) prot...
Survey Question: How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic resources? ...
Survey Question: Have you ever canceled an electronic resource because it had low use? ...
“How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic resources?” ...
What do you collect and how important is it? Q3 What types of library ...
Using StatisticsWhat will you do with usage statistics? – Make changes and improvements – Request additional resources bas...
Interview Question: What do you think that you should be doing with electronic resource usage statistics? ...
Survey Question: Do you plan to collect additional statistics in the next two years? ...
Sharing Usage Statistics• Who needs to know about usage statistics? – Identify stakeholders – What will the reports loo...
Survey Question: Are usage statistics for libraryelectronic resources reported outside the library? Not sur...
Survey Question: Who receives regular electronic resourcesstatistical reports from the person or people who collect them? ...
Survey Question: Who collects electronic resources statistical reports at your library? (Choose all that apply.) ...
Survey Question: Is collecting electronic resourcesstatistical data something that is written into one or m...
Interview Question: What would you consider a best practicefor collection management statistics for electronic resources? ...
Interview Question: How do you prioritize uses of the electronicresources usage statistics you collect? Or what is most im...
Assessment Process NASIG 2012
Survey Question: Has there been any attempt at your libraryto incorporate usage data into assessment of library services? ...
Interview Question: How do you determine if usage statistics are evaluated and consulted successfully? ...
Statistics can play a more progressivelyimportant role in determining the return oninvestment with library dollars. ...
80/20 DistributionThomas Nisonger (2008) states, “The basic 80/20pattern provides a valid approach tooperationalizing the ...
Quantitative Data– Cost-per-use– Number of disciplines– Historical usage data (including five year trends)– Interlibrary l...
Qualitative Data – Experience or the gut feeling – User feedback – Reviews – The dust factor for print resourc...
Decisions and planning up front are often themost time-consuming part of the process.--Hulbert, Roach & Julian, 2011 ...
Case Study INancy Beals of Wayne State University created a “Stats Master” spreadsheetand training program for selectors (...
Case Study IILinda Hulbert & Dani Roach of University of St. Thomas Libraries developedan “Electronic Resources Review Che...
Case Study IIIMary Ann Trail and Kerry Chang-FitzGibbon describe how the Library of theRichard Stockton College of New Jer...
Case Study IVBryan Vogh and Hans Kishel (2011)at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire chartedthe workflow necessary fo...
Case Study VCarol Tenopir (2010) looks at ROI of the value ofe-journals to grants income.• “I could not submit as many gra...
Case Study VI-?What You or Your Colleagues are Doing(Audience Provides At Least One Example.) NASIG 2012
ReferencesBob Schufreider & Sion Romaine (2008): Making Sense of your Usage Statistics, The Serials Librarian, 54:3-4, 223...
Thank You!Stephanie H. WicalAssistant ProfessorPeriodicals and Electronic Resources LibrarianMcIntyre LibraryUniversity of...
of 52

Strategic collection management through statistical analysis

Libraries collect and use many different types of statistics, but effectively managing them is a challenging opportunity for libraries to understand statistical trends through analysis. Stephanie H. Wical and Hans Kishel surveyed and interviewed Wisconsin academic libraries in order to understand what statistics these libraries currently collect. What tools and measures do Wisconsin academic libraries use and for what purpose? What do these libraries consider best practices? New tools have been developed that help manage statistics but questions remain. How do we compare statistics across vendors? What measures are libraries using and why? Have Wisconsin academic libraries discovered effective ways to manipulate and present their data? How do libraries value and prioritize uses of statistics that they collect? Is it possible to analyze statistics to paint a compelling picture to justify collection development decisions or planning? Lastly, how can we begin to assess how successfully we use statistics for various purposes? This presentation explores these questions as well as several case studies that highlight examples of real libraries and how they manage statistics. It is our hope that this talk will help engage library staff in a discussion about how to most effectively manage library resources.Presented by Stephanie H. Wical on behalf of Stephanie H. Wical and Hans Kishel.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Strategic collection management through statistical analysis

  • 1. Strategic CollectionManagement through Statistical Analysis Stephanie H. Wical University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire & Hans Kishel University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2. Methodology• Identified academic libraries in Wisconsin using a directory maintained by Wisconsin Association of Academic Libraries.• Surveyed academic librarians who were believed to have some role (if not sole responsibility) for electronic resource management.• Interviewed academic librarians (who were a subset of the group who responded to the survey). NASIG 2012
  • 3. Demographics of the GroupThe group included libraries in public andprivate colleges and universities, technicalcolleges, two-year colleges and for-profitcolleges and universities in the state ofWisconsin or academic libraries that providelibrary service to residents of the state ofWisconsin. NASIG 2012
  • 4. Response Rate• 139 surveys distributed via e-mail• 62 completed survey responses• 28 completed phone interviews45% Response Rate for the Survey as of May 25, 2012 NASIG 2012
  • 5. Survey Question: What types of library electronicresources statistics--if any--do you currently collect? (Choose all that apply.) N=62 Answer Responses Percentage Searches 54 87% Sessions 46 74% Full Text Downloads 41 66% Cost-per-use 25 40% IP Addresses that access resources 3 5% Simultaneous Users 9 15% Turn-aways 27 44% Times authors at your college or university are cited in resources 1 2% Times authors at your college or university cite resources 2 3% Scholarly Impact 1 2% Not sure 3 5% None 1 2% Other (Please specify.) 6 10% NASIG 2012
  • 6. Survey Question: What measure or measures do youconsider when evaluating electronic resources in your library? (Choose all that apply.) N=62 Answer Response Percentage Searches 53 85% Sessions 39 63% Full Text Downloads 38 61% Cost-per-use 37 60% IP Addresses 1 2% Simultaneous Users 19 31% Turn-aways 21 34% Times authors at your college or university are cited in resources 3 5% Times authors at your college or university cite resources 3 5% Scholarly Impact 20 32% Not sure 2 3% None 1 2% Other (Please specify.) 7 11% NASIG 2012
  • 7. A Comparison of Collected and Considered605040302010 Considered 0 Collected N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 8. Searches, Sessions, Full Text Downloads and Turnaways NASIG 2012
  • 9. Survey Question: How frequently do you consider your measure or measures? Never 2% Other (Please specify.) Not sure 16% 5% Once a year 39% Monthly 16% During the fall and spring semesters Quarterly 16% 6% N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 10. Interview Question: Do you look at cost-per- use for electronic resources? No 32% Yes 68% N=28 NASIG 2012
  • 11. IP Addresses That Access ResourcesThis measure might be important down theroad as departments outside of the librarymight have to share costs for resources. NASIG 2012
  • 12. Times Cited or Times CitingCollecting this type of information was not a highpriority for any of the librarians we talked to. NASIG 2012
  • 13. Scholarly Impact• Scholarly impact is not something one routinely tracks, but it is something that is valuable when considering adding a new resource. Image from Experimental Physiology at http://ep.physoc.org/site/misc/author.xhtml NASIG 2012
  • 14. Interview Question: What measure or measures do youconsider when evaluating electronic resources in your library? N=2870%60%50%40%30%20%10%0% NASIG 2012
  • 15. Interview Question: Why do you use the measure or measures you use to evaluate electronic resources? 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Budget We have always done To get idea of what Renewal To be able to compare it that way / It is what students are using we get N=28 NASIG 2012
  • 16. Interview Question: Do you feel that the measure or measures you use are adequate or do you feel that they do not provide relevant information? N=28 No 21% Yes 50% So-So 29% NASIG 2012
  • 17. People who were not satisfied with usage statistics indicated:• Not all of them are counter compliant.• Could always use more data.• Sometimes usage statistics do not account for a lot of variables.• It would be nice to find a measure that can be looked at across vendors.• They are not relevant at all; statistics are a joke.• We are drowning in data. NASIG 2012
  • 18. Where one library may see value in a set ofstatistics, another library may need somethingmore. ---Schufreider & Romaine (2008) NASIG 2012
  • 19. Survey Question: What tool or tools do you use to gatherstatistics for evaluating electronic journals, databases and/or electronic books? (Choose all that apply.) N=61 Answers Number Using Tool Percentages SFX Ustat 5 8% ERMes (developed at UW- La Crosse) 8 13% Scholarly Stats 1 2% Serials Solution 360 Link 4 7% Serials Solutions 360 Resource Manager 5 8% EBSCO ERM Essentials 4 7% EBSCO LinkSource 7 11% Ex Libris’ Verde 1 2% Innovative ERM 1 2% Open ERM 1 2% OCLC Worldcat Link Manager 2 3% CORAL ERM 1 2% Excel spreadsheet or other spreadsheet software 40 66% Access database or other database software 10 16% Not sure 10 16% None 2 3% Other (Please specify.) 15 25% NASIG 2012
  • 20. Finding 66% are using Excel in addition to another tool N=61 Serials Solutions 360 Resource Manager ERMes (developed at UW- La Crosse) OCLC Worldcat Link Manager Serials Solution 360 Link Other (Please specify.) EBSCO ERM Essentials EBSCO LinkSource Innovative ERM Ex Libris’ Verde Scholarly Stats CORAL ERM Q6 What tool or tools do you use to gather statistics Open ERM SFX Ustat Not sure for evaluating electronic journals, databases and/or electronic books? Excel spreadsheet or other spreadsheet softwareExcel spreadsheet or other spreadsheet software 4 7 1 3 2 4 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 NASIG 2012
  • 21. Survey Question: Are you able to compare statistics across vendors and platforms? Other (Please specify.) 13% Not sure 16% Yes 60% No 11% N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 22. Survey Question: Have you taken advantage of theStandardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol to obtain usage reports? Other (Please specify.) 7% Yes 7% Not sure 16% Plan to do so in the next two No years 57% 13% N=61 NASIG 2012
  • 23. Survey Question: How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic resources? Very unimportant 8% Unimportant 2% Neither unimportant nor important Very important (neutral) 35% 16% Important N=62 39% NASIG 2012
  • 24. Survey Question: Have you ever canceled an electronic resource because it had low use? N=62 Not sure No 11% 8% Yes 81% NASIG 2012
  • 25. “How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic resources?” & “Have you ever canceled an electronic resource because it had low use?” How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic Have you ever canceled an resources? electronic resource Grand because it had low use? Total Not Yes No sure Very unimportant 3 2 5 Unimportant 1 1 Neither unimportant nor important (neutral) 6 3 1 10 Important 20 1 3 24 Very important 21 1 22 Grand Total 50 5 7 N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 26. What do you collect and how important is it? Q3 What types of library electronic resources statistics--if any--do you currently collect? (Choose all that apply.) IP Addresses that access resources Times authors at your college or Times authors at your college or university are cited in resources university cite resources Other (Please specify.) Full Text Downloads Simultaneous Users Scholarly Impact Cost-per-use Turn-aways Searches Not sure Sessions None Q14 How important are usage statistics in the decision to renew or cancel electronic resources?Very unimportant 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1Unimportant 1Neither unimportant nor important (neutral) 8 7 6 2 1 3 1Important 21 19 16 8 2 7 11 1 1 1 3Very important 21 16 15 11 1 1 9 1 2Grand Total 54 46 41 25 3 9 27 1 2 1 3 1 6 NASIG 2012
  • 27. Using StatisticsWhat will you do with usage statistics? – Make changes and improvements – Request additional resources based upon data NASIG 2012
  • 28. Interview Question: What do you think that you should be doing with electronic resource usage statistics? Better organized / Marketing SUSHI 11% 12% What is getting used Renewal/informed 12% decisions 19% Bang for the Buck 15% Communication 19% More indepth 12% N=28 NASIG 2012
  • 29. Survey Question: Do you plan to collect additional statistics in the next two years? Do you plan to 0% collect additional Not sure statistics in the 11% next two Yes years? 37% 0% Maybe; it will depend on circumstances (e.g. budget or staffing) 42% No 10% N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 30. Sharing Usage Statistics• Who needs to know about usage statistics? – Identify stakeholders – What will the reports look like? – What is the right amount of information? – Should the reports look different for different people? – Should an executive summary be written for an administrator? NASIG 2012
  • 31. Survey Question: Are usage statistics for libraryelectronic resources reported outside the library? Not sure 26% Yes 50% No 24% N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 32. Survey Question: Who receives regular electronic resourcesstatistical reports from the person or people who collect them? (Choose all that apply.) N=62 Answers Responses Percentages Electronic Resources Librarian 10 16% Periodicals Librarian 7 11% Technical Services Librarian 5 8% Director / Dean 30 48% Administrator who supervises the director or dean of the library 7 11% Reference Librarian 10 16% Systems Librarian 5 8% Everyone in the library 13 21% Everyone on the e-resources team, work group or task force 4 6% Anyone who reads the annual report 5 8% Anyone who reads the library newsletter 0 0% Anyone who reads the library blog, Facebook page, or twitter feed 0 0% No one 7 11% Not sure 4 6% Other (Please specify.) 16 26% NASIG 2012
  • 33. Survey Question: Who collects electronic resources statistical reports at your library? (Choose all that apply.) N=62 Answers Responses Percentages Electronic Resources Librarian 17 27% Periodicals Librarian 7 11% Technical Services Librarian 6 10% Director / Dean 13 21% Reference Librarian 6 10% Systems Librarian 8 13% Paraprofessional 13 21% Student Workers 2 3% We don’t collect them at our library---they are collected on a system or consortial level 10 16% Our vendor collects them for us 11 18% We do not collect them at all 1 2% Not sure 0 0% Other (Please specify.) 10 16% NASIG 2012
  • 34. Survey Question: Is collecting electronic resourcesstatistical data something that is written into one or more job descriptions? Other N=62 (Please specify.) 2% Not sure 18% Yes 37% No 43% NASIG 2012
  • 35. Interview Question: What would you consider a best practicefor collection management statistics for electronic resources? Answer # of responses % No Idea 7 25% ERM 2 7% SUSHI 5 18% Collect Regularly 1 4% Check them to make sure they are right 1 4% Big Picture thinking 2 7% Compare over time 3 11% Feedback 2 7% Review Regularly 1 4% How students use 1 4% Cost per use 1 4% COUNTER 2 7% Use them 2 7% N=28 NASIG 2012
  • 36. Interview Question: How do you prioritize uses of the electronicresources usage statistics you collect? Or what is most important? N=28 Answers Number of Responses Percentages What getting used 9 32% Cost per use 1 4% Renewal 6 21% Annual Report 5 18% Turnaways 1 4% FT-DL 4 14% Search 5 18% Course integration 2 7% Sessions 1 4% Budget 4 14% Faculty Requests 1 4% Vendor Data 2 7% ACRL Reports 1 4% Dont 1 4% Advertising 1 4% Bang for Buck 2 7% Look for Changes/Problems 2 7% NASIG 2012
  • 37. Assessment Process NASIG 2012
  • 38. Survey Question: Has there been any attempt at your libraryto incorporate usage data into assessment of library services? Not sure 16% Yes 49% No 35% N=62 NASIG 2012
  • 39. Interview Question: How do you determine if usage statistics are evaluated and consulted successfully? N=28 Feedback 26% Dont If there is a 59% problem then something is wrong 15% NASIG 2012
  • 40. Statistics can play a more progressivelyimportant role in determining the return oninvestment with library dollars. ---Beals & Lesher (2010) NASIG 2012
  • 41. 80/20 DistributionThomas Nisonger (2008) states, “The basic 80/20pattern provides a valid approach tooperationalizing the core journal concept and isapplicable to collection management decisionmaking” (p. 78).Although Nisonger (2008) admits that thepercentages do not match the 80/20 ruleexactly, should we make sure that the majority ofour budget is going into resources that get themajority of use? NASIG 2012
  • 42. Quantitative Data– Cost-per-use– Number of disciplines– Historical usage data (including five year trends)– Interlibrary loan data– Impact factorsSource: Hulbert, Roach & Julian (2011) NASIG 2012
  • 43. Qualitative Data – Experience or the gut feeling – User feedback – Reviews – The dust factor for print resourcesSource: Hulbert, Roach & Julian (2011) NASIG 2012
  • 44. Decisions and planning up front are often themost time-consuming part of the process.--Hulbert, Roach & Julian, 2011 NASIG 2012
  • 45. Case Study INancy Beals of Wayne State University created a “Stats Master” spreadsheetand training program for selectors (Beals & Romaine, 2010). NASIG 2012
  • 46. Case Study IILinda Hulbert & Dani Roach of University of St. Thomas Libraries developedan “Electronic Resources Review Checklist” and a way to “connect the silos”to contribute to the university’s overall culture of assessment (Hulbert, Roach& Julian, 2011) NASIG 2012
  • 47. Case Study IIIMary Ann Trail and Kerry Chang-FitzGibbon describe how the Library of theRichard Stockton College of New Jersey addressed a $29,000 shortfall usingan overlap analysis report (Trail, Chang-FitzGibbon & Wishnetsky (2012). NASIG 2012
  • 48. Case Study IVBryan Vogh and Hans Kishel (2011)at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire chartedthe workflow necessary for adding a new database for the McIntyre Library to bestutilize BP Logix. NASIG 2012
  • 49. Case Study VCarol Tenopir (2010) looks at ROI of the value ofe-journals to grants income.• “I could not submit as many grants. With grant funding at 4- 6% of submitted proposals I would not have achieved my current funding level.” (U.S. University)• “I guess on average the online access saves me more than 10 hours per week.” (Western European Research Institute) (p. 44). NASIG 2012
  • 50. Case Study VI-?What You or Your Colleagues are Doing(Audience Provides At Least One Example.) NASIG 2012
  • 51. ReferencesBob Schufreider & Sion Romaine (2008): Making Sense of your Usage Statistics, The Serials Librarian, 54:3-4, 223-227, fromhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03615260801974164Bryan Vogh & Hans Kishel (2011): E-forms: Making Workflows Work, UMWUG Conference in Fargo, ND, October 17, 2011, fromhttp://people.uwec.edu/voghbs/UMWUG_E-forms_Handout.pdfCarol Tenopir (2010): Measuring the Value of the Academic Library: Return on Investment and Other Value Measures, Serials Librarian, 58:1-4, 39-48, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03615261003623005Linda Hulbert, Dani Roach & Gail Julian (recorder)(2011): Integrating Usage Statistics into Collection Development Decisions, The SerialsLibrarian, 60:1-4, 158-163, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2011.556027Mary Ann Trail, Kerry Chang-FitzGibbon & Susan Wishnetsky (recorder)(2012): Using Assessment to Make Difficult Choices in CuttingPeriodicals, The Serials Librarian, 62:1-4, 159-163, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2012.652931Nancy Beals & Marcella Lesher (2010): Managing Electronic Resource Statistics, The Serials Librarian, 58:1-4, 219-223, fromhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03615261003625844Sarah Glasser & Michael A. Arthur (recorder) (2011): When Jobs Disappear: The Staffing Implications of the Elimination of Print SerialsManagement Tasks, The Serials Librarian, 60:1-4, 109-113, fromhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2011.556447Thomas E. Nisonger (2008): The “80/20 Rule” and Core Journals, The Serials Librarian, 55:1-2,62-84, fromhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03615260801970774 NASIG 2012
  • 52. Thank You!Stephanie H. WicalAssistant ProfessorPeriodicals and Electronic Resources LibrarianMcIntyre LibraryUniversity of Wisconsin – Eau Claire105 Garfield AvenueEau Claire, WI 54702(715) 836-3508wicalsh@uwec.eduHans F. KishelAssistant ProfessorResearch and Instruction Librarian for ScienceMcIntyre LibraryUniversity of Wisconsin – Eau Claire105 Garfield AvenueEau Claire, WI 54702(715) 836-2959kishelhf@uwec.edu NASIG 2012