Puzzle DISC/Carrot
Combination
Commercial
An analysis which describes the way in which you
communicate with and relate to ...
Index
3 Introduction to the Puzzle analysis
4 Basic behaviour
5 Some distinguishing characteristics / It is
natural for yo...
Introduction to the Puzzle analysis
The Puzzle is a communication analysis which can be used in many situations where
peop...
Basic behaviour
Basic behaviour describes your natural behaviour. It reflects how you approach those
around you when you f...
Some distinguishing characteristics
All combinations of behavioural factors are associated with characteristics that can b...
This motivates you
What motivates one behaviour style is often not at all motivating for another. Below are a
few statemen...
This is how you communicate with others
Different behaviour styles have different ways of communicating with their
surroun...
Value to the organisation
All behavioural styles have qualities which are important to the organisation in which they
work...
This is how you can increase your efficiency
Here are a few suggestions to help you develop your ability to work with othe...
Adapted behaviour
Your adapted behaviour reflects the changes you feel you need to make in order to fit
into a given situa...
This is how you approach difficulties and
challenges
Dominance features or the Red puzzle piece determine how different
be...
This is how you communicate your
thoughts and ideas to those around you
Influence features or the Yellow puzzle piece dete...
This is how you respond to the pace of your
surroundings
Stability features or the Green puzzle piece determine how differ...
This is how you respond to the rules and
procedures in your surroundings
Conformity features or the Blue puzzle piece dete...
The playing field
By placing the value for each DISC-factor on the respective axis and connecting them with a
line, you ge...
Selling with colours
Over the last 30 to 40 years, psychology and behavioural science have been applied
increasingly often...
From unconscious incompetence to unconscious
competency
Developing as a salesperson is like going on a journey – a journey...
How you work with the preparation and contact
phase
The initial contact is of crucial importance to the future purchasing ...
How you work with the needs analysis phase
Understanding the customer's situation lies at the heart of all selling. Consci...
How you work with the presentation phase
A good presentation will strengthen the customer’s feeling of need. The presentat...
How you work with the closure phase
Closure starts at the precise moment when you decide to deal with a customer.
Througho...
Prominent qualities in your behavioural style
Qualities which can be seen in both your basic behaviour and your adapted be...
Prominent qualities in your behavioural style,
continued...
Patient
Patient people often appreciate open and friendly rela...
Prominent qualities
Here, the intensity of the twelve qualities which are associated with the colours are
shown in a bar c...
Qualities presented in diagram form
1: Performance oriented 2: Self-motivating 3: Independent 4: Influential
5: Enthusiast...
Introduction : Carrot
Why is it important to know what motivates an employee? Simply because motivation is
about personal ...
Introduction : Carrot, continued...
Attitudes fulfil various functions for an individual:
Attitudes give meaning to life (...
Description of the seven driving forces
Individuals whose main driving force is knowledge are mainly interested in discove...
On the basis of your answers in the analysis, you have
obtained the following percentage distribution of the
various drivi...
Your strongest driving force: Self-fulfilment
Individuals with self-fulfilment as a strong driving force have a great inte...
Your second strongest driving force: Practical
Individuals with a strong practical driving force value practical creation ...
Your third strongest driving force: Ethical - Moral
An individual with an ethical - moral driving force has a pronounced s...
Your fourth strongest driving force:
Consideration
Individuals with consideration as their driving force are interested in...
Description of various combinations of driving
forces
Practical/Self-fulfilment
practical creation is self-fulfilment
disc...
Red behavioural style with different driving
forces
Self-fulfilment A Red person with a self-fulfilment driving force is h...
Yellow behavioural style with different driving
forces
Self-fulfilment Yellow people with self-fulfilment as their driving...
Green behavioural style with different driving
forces
Self-fulfilment Green people with Self-fulfilment as their driving f...
Blue behavioural style with different driving
forces
Self-fulfilment Blue people with Self-fulfilment as their driving for...
Appendix
Explanations of the 12 qualities relation to the DISC-colours
Performance oriented
Achieving results is important...
Appendix, continued...
Enthusiastic
Enthusiastic people are friendly and extroverted. They like a fast pace. Their eager a...
Appendix, continued...
Firm
Principled people stick to their word and like to do what they have promised. They may find
it...
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Natalie_Eastwood-Combination- DISC

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Natalie_Eastwood-Combination- DISC

  • 1. Puzzle DISC/Carrot Combination Commercial An analysis which describes the way in which you communicate with and relate to those around you Natalie Eastwood Ethos natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Analysis date: 11/09/2015 Time: 15 minutes Print date: 02/11/2015 Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter Oakfield Drive Cofton Hackett B45 8AN Birmingham 0121 445 2033 michelle@ensize.com
  • 2. Index 3 Introduction to the Puzzle analysis 4 Basic behaviour 5 Some distinguishing characteristics / It is natural for you 6 This motivates you / This is how you organise and plan / This is how you make decisions 7 This is how you communicate with others / Consequenses of your way of communicating 8 Value to the organisation / Information for your manager 9 This is how you can increase your efficiency 10 Adapted behaviour 11 This is how you approach difficulties and challenges 12 This is how you communicate your thoughts and ideas to those around you 13 This is how you respond to the pace of your surroundings 14 This is how you respond to the rules and procedures in your surroundings 15 The playing field 16 Selling with colours 17 From unconscious incompetence to unconscious competency 18 How you work with the preparation and contact phase 19 How you work with the needs analysis phase 20 How you work with the presentation phase 21 How you work with the closure phase 22 Prominent qualities in your behavioural style 24 Prominent qualities 25 Qualities presented in diagram form 26 Introduction : Carrot 28 Description of the seven driving forces 29 On the basis of your answers in the analysis, you have obtained the following percentage distribution of the various driving forces. 30 Your strongest driving force 31 Your second strongest driving force 32 Your third strongest driving force 33 Your fourth strongest driving force 34 Description of various combinations of driving forces 35 Red behavioural style with different driving forces 36 Yellow behavioural style with different driving forces 37 Green behavioural style with different driving forces 38 Blue behavioural style with different driving forces 39 Appendix Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 3. Introduction to the Puzzle analysis The Puzzle is a communication analysis which can be used in many situations where people’s differences are important, such as in recruitment, group development, management development, sales development and communication. Everyone has different behavioural styles. Some people call this personal chemistry, but behavioural style is also about how we deal with different tasks. Knowing and understanding each other’s behavioural styles creates a more open corporate climate. The Puzzle is a tool which gives greater self-insight and makes communication easier. The Puzzle is based on a number of elements, including William Moulton Marston’s (1) DISC model. The Puzzle describes an individual’s natural behaviour (basic behaviour) and how he/she adapts to a certain environment or surroundings (adapted behaviour). The Puzzle highlights the various ways of behaving using puzzle pieces and colours. The following DISC characteristics are represented by the following colours: D = Dominance – red puzzle piece I = Influence – yellow puzzle piece S = Stability – green puzzle piece C = Compliance – blue puzzle piece (1) William Moulton Marston (1893-1947), who published ‘Emotions of Normal People’ in 1928.   How to read the report In this report, you will get a description of both your basic behavior and your adapted behavior. Your basic behaviour describes your natural behaviour. It reflects how you approach the people around you when you feel secure and relaxed. Your adapted behaviour reflects the changes you feel you need to make in order to fit into a given situation, at work for example. If you have two or more DISC factors above 50%, you may occasionally experience some descriptions of your behavior as contradictory. That's because we use different behaviours at different times and in different situations. We can for example be open and talkative at times, while other times we are more thoughtful and reticent, depending on how we perceive the situation. You will probably find that some parts of the report provide a good description of your behavior, while other parts seem less accurate. It is therefore a good idea to read the report with a pencil in your hand. You can for example put a plus sign in the margin for things you think are good descriptions, a minus sign for things you do not think are correct, and a question mark for things you need to think through or maybe discuss with someone who knows you well. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 3 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 3 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 4. Basic behaviour Basic behaviour describes your natural behaviour. It reflects how you approach those around you when you feel secure and relaxed. The general pattern in your profile is probably the most effective with regard to relationships with others in a wider sense. You find it easy to be at your ease with others and your easygoing nature means that you feel comfortable even with people you do not know. You are often persuasive and charming. Steadiness in your profile means that you also have the ability to listen in a relaxed way when the situation so requires. You normally also have a sympathetic ear for others and are prepared to help solve their problems if possible. At those times you can be a somewhat more passive receiver of other people's thoughts and feelings. You are generally interested in personal matters and understand others. You are motivated by social contact and appreciate the support and approval of others. Many of your contacts with other people are based on feelings and you have very good communication skills. Not only can you formulate your own message, you are also able to listen to the views of others. You often behave confidently and at the same time are warm and friendly with those around you. Your free and easy style and genuine interest in other's thoughts and feelings means that people usually come to you for advice and support. Despite the fact that this is undoubtedly strengths, you have a tendency to overemphasise the social side of your nature. You can be less interested in productivity and efficiency and occasionally your attitude towards this may be negative, particularly if you perceive that these more formal activities conflict with a positive relationship with another person. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 4 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 4 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 5. Some distinguishing characteristics All combinations of behavioural factors are associated with characteristics that can be described as strengths, but also ones that can be limiting. Based on your answers you will get a general description of some of your most distinguishing traits. You are a warm, open person who is sensitive and responsive to the needs of others while having great faith in your social skills. You can be both active and supportive in social contexts. Just as you have the ability to persuade others that your ideas and views are sound, you can also listen to other people's problems. You often contribute to creating a positive atmosphere in the workplace. Perhaps your most significant limitation is that you find it difficult to handle rejection. You seek positive attention from people around you and you easily lose motivation if that attention is lacking. That also applies if your work involves rejection from colleagues or clients. Your performance will then probably suffer.   It is natural for you Different behaviour styles include different ways to approach your surrounding environment. Surroundings include other people, events, circumstance and demands in a given situation. Based on your answers you will get some examples of how you usually deal with your surroundings. Its natural for you: to set unattainable goals to do a risk assessment before you start a project to prefer to consult others before you decide how to act to seldom make hasty decisions to clearly show your commitment in an issue to prefer to be the centre of attention to get others in line with your thinking to be a skilled communicator to not make any heavy demands on others to seldom allow yourself to be stressed to prefer to solve conflicts without harsh words to appreciate friendly relationships to stand up for your views to question old, well-tried experience to be able to think outside the given boundaries to seldom be at a loss Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 5 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 5 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 6. This motivates you What motivates one behaviour style is often not at all motivating for another. Below are a few statements that can be important for you to feel motivated. It motivates you: that expressing feelings is allowed to work with communication and information to have warm and friendly relationships in the workplace to resolve disagreements in peaceful ways   This is how you organise and plan Some behaviour styles place great emphasis on organising and planning their work, while others do not think this is so important. The following descriptions can be relevant for you. Formal behaviour and rigid rules appear to you as inhibition. You work better in an open environment where your actions are not subject to detailed supervision. You are therefore not someone who naturally makes long-term plans, even though you normally think before you act.   This is how you make decisions Decisions can be made in different ways. Some behaviour styles want to base decisions on data and facts, while others rely more on 'gut feeling'. Your way of making decisions can be described as follows. You are a sociable, friendly person who takes the opinions and feelings of others into consideration. That also applies when you make decisions. You always try to minimise any negative effects of a decision on colleagues and others. Since much of your decision- making is based on personal feelings, it may be necessary for you to carry out a more thorough assessment, particularly when important decisions are to be made. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 6 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 6 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 7. This is how you communicate with others Different behaviour styles have different ways of communicating with their surroundings. It could be said that it is about typical ways of behaving in order to communicate a message to those around you. Below are a few descriptions of how you communicate with others. You use like to use gestures to emphasise your message You are a skilled communicator You do not make any greater demands on others You prefer friendly relationships and think that conflicts are unpleasant   Consequenses of your way of communicating Here is some advice on how you can manage the consequences of your way of communicating. Bear in mind that others may perceive your lively attitude as being irresponsible Don’t forget the balance between emotional and fact-based arguments Even you can have the right to make demands Sometimes you have to dare to stand up for your views Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 7 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 7 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 8. Value to the organisation All behavioural styles have qualities which are important to the organisation in which they work. Below are some of your contributions. You base your assessments on a solid factual base You are not the one who make overly optimistic estimates You take the time needed to arrive at well-founded decision You are happy to listen to different views before you make a decision You are often a good speaker You an agile mind and become easily involved in different questions You are a skilled communicator You often use emotional arguments to influence your surroundings You are not so easily stressed You work calmly and methodically without making demands on your surroundings You appreciate matter-of-fact and calm discussions You have a friendly attitude You speak up when you think something is wrong You can present inconvenient views You can think beyond the given boundaries You often find constructive solutions to problems   Information for your manager Different behaviour styles need to be managed in different ways to do good work and enjoy the tasks. Here your boss will get a few tips that can be useful to both of you in your relationship. Understand that you need positive acknowledgement in order not to lose your self-confidence Realise the value of your good communication skills Understand that you function best when you do not need to work under time pressure Ask for your views on an issue, since you can have difficulty presenting a critical opinion Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 8 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 8 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 9. This is how you can increase your efficiency Here are a few suggestions to help you develop your ability to work with others and carry out your tasks more effectively. You may need others who: are selfmotivated and can take initiative can start and get others started on a project or challenge can work under unpredictable circumstances focus on work tasks seek facts as basis for decisions are honest and to the point are logical and deal with problems methodically prefer to work with practical things rather than with relationships and people follow up results of work on their own initiative   You may need: to obtain confirmation of your personal value to help to implement decisions guidelines for performance of tasks a clear understanding of when work must be completed to make objective decisions to feel involvement and participation in decisions to be able to prioritise and establish time frames to be prepared for the fact that not everyone agrees to be more decisive and keep to decisions once they are made not perceive feedback as criticism to learn to put up with the fact that people have different opinions Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 9 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 9 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 10. Adapted behaviour Your adapted behaviour reflects the changes you feel you need to make in order to fit into a given situation, at work for example. You can determine what adaptations you make in relation to your basic behaviour. You are a stable, reliable person with pronounced social skills, confidence and a willingness to take the initiative that is unusual in social types. At the same time, you like to feel free and unfettered. You therefore like to go your own way and you prefer to take responsibility for your own actions. A combination of patience and determination gives you the ability to get results, but you also have the ability to meticulously weigh up the various options before making a final decision. Your strong sense of independence means that you are ready to stand up for your own values and decisions while, at the same time, defending your opinions. This underlying determination and certainty is more pronounced when you are in difficult, demanding situations. It is important for you to retain control over your life. You are a social person who likes to work with others. However, that does not necessarily mean direct cooperation; but is more a question of having others around you. In a work group or team for example, you are normally the one to assume leadership. You normally also have the self-confidence to enable you to feel comfortable with strangers and in new, unfamiliar situations. Personal success and appreciation is important for you, but you are also open and patient with others, which makes your self-assertive traits less prominent. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 10 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 10 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 11. This is how you approach difficulties and challenges Dominance features or the Red puzzle piece determine how different behavioural styles deal with difficulties and challenges. People with a lot of Red in their behavioural style are courageous, unafraid and energetic. They do not shy away from problems, and are often able to see how challenges can be overcome. When relating to others, they are up-front and direct. Patience is not one of their strengths, and they become angry easily. Basic behaviour You prefer to have facts as the basis for your decision-making. You can spend a considerable amount of time collecting information that illuminates an issue from different sides and evaluate the conceivable outcome of a decision given this background. Sometimes you can be critical towards people in your surroundings who are not as well informed as you. Remember that all development begins with an idea. It is easy to be critical, more difficult to see opportunities even in a "sweeping" thought. Adapted behaviour It is natural for you to clearly declare your views on an issue. You do not hesitate to confront “disagreeable” matters. You prefer to deal with difficulties right away rather than “beat about the bush”. What you perhaps do not think about is that others can feel attacked and hurt by your straightforwardness. Adaptation In your current work situation, you feel that you need to be more direct and clear than you normally are. You believe that you need to be more independent, rely more on your own ability and take more initiative. However, the shift between basic behaviour and adapted behaviour is not particularly great; maintaining this does not therefore require a great deal of mental energy, and it is rarely something which will make you feel pressurised. Patience Anger Basic behaviour Adapted behaviour Taking responsibility Self-sufficient Traditional Conservative Moderate Competitive Strong-willed Straightforward Realistic Taking responsibility Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 11 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 11 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 12. This is how you communicate your thoughts and ideas to those around you Influence features or the Yellow puzzle piece determine how different behavioural styles communicate their thoughts and ideas to those around them. People with a lot of Yellow in their behavioural style are sociable and extroverted. They like to believe the best of people, and find it easy to mix with people even if they do not know them. They are extremely eloquent, and are able to win others over to their point of view with their friendly persuasion. They need positive appreciation in order to do themselves justice, and may find criticism hard to take. Basic behaviour You very lively display what you think in different matters. You easily become involved and like to gesticulate when you talk. You enjoy being the centre of attention. If you feel ignored or rejected you can however lose some of your good self-confidence and feel dejected and downhearted. Adapted behaviour When you are committed to an issue you like to get others to share your commitment. You are a skilled communicator and can, using your verbal abilities, influence your surroundings to suit your purposes. You more frequently use emotional arguments rather than factual ones. Adaptation In your current work situation, you feel that you are required to behave in a more formal and disciplined manner. You therefore try to be more structured and organised in the way in which you go about your tasks. However, the shift between basic behaviour and adapted behaviour is not particularly great; maintaining this does not therefore require a great deal of mental energy, and it is rarely something which will make you feel pressurised. Pessimism Optimism Basic behaviour Adapted behaviour Emotional Captivating Self-confident Optimistic Independent Captivating Self-confident Optimistic Independent Trusting Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 12 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 12 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 13. This is how you respond to the pace of your surroundings Stability features or the Green puzzle piece determine how different behavioural styles deal with the pace of their surroundings. People with a lot of Green in their behavioural style are calm and patient, and rarely show what they are thinking and feeling. They value harmony and stability in their surroundings. They may therefore find it hard to deal with unforeseen or sudden changes. They are often loyal team players who are keen to complete a task which they have taken on. Basic behaviour You are usually a stable person who is not easily stressed. You have accepted that there are things in life that can’t be changed. You prefer a quiet and peaceful life instead of hustle and bustle. You want to perform your tasks in a calm and consistent manner and do not make any greater demands on others. With your relaxed attitude you often develop warm and friendly relationships with people in your surroundings. Adapted behaviour You are usually patient and calm and display a friendly openness towards people in your surroundings. You are often the one who stands for stability in the work group. Good relationships and that people support and encourage each other is important to you. You can have difficulty with colleagues who work too individualistically and who do not participate in joint efforts. Adaptation In your current work situation, you feel that you are required to behave in a more stable and persistent manner than you normally do. You therefore try to slow the pace and fully complete tasks which you have taken on. Depending on the circumstances, this may also mean that you perceive your work situation as requiring you to show a friendlier, more open attitude to those around you. However, the shift between basic behaviour and adapted behaviour is not particularly great; maintaining this does not therefore require a great deal of mental energy, and it is rarely something which will make you feel pressurised. Vivid Placid Basic behaviour Adapted behaviour Eager to please Cooperative Patient Relaxed Demanding Friendly Eager to please Cooperative Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 13 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 13 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 14. This is how you respond to the rules and procedures in your surroundings Conformity features or the Blue puzzle piece determine how different behavioural styles deal with the rules and regulations in their surroundings. People with a lot of Blue in their behavioural style have a real need for control and security. They therefore want to know what authority they have, and are careful to keep within given boundaries. They are disciplined and attentive to detail. They strive for a high level of quality in the work they carry out, and may find it hard to deliver work which does not meet their high standards. They may therefore find it hard to stick to deadlines. Basic behaviour You are not afraid stick your neck out when you think something is wrong. You can’t duck if you want to solve difficult problems. You do not shy away from presenting inconvenient views and are often the one who speaks for the group. Sometimes you can perhaps be disappointed when it turns out that the group as a whole does not give you the support you thought you had. Adapted behaviour You often have a clear and definite opinion about things. When you have made a decision you would like to implement it also. You prefer not to be influenced by the views of others. Sometimes your firm attitude means that you miss nuances and see the world to much in terms of black or white. Adaptation In your current work situation, you feel that you need to be more attentive to details than is normally the case. This often leads to you relying less on your own judgement, preferring to ask for advice before deciding how to act. However, the shift between basic behaviour and adapted behaviour is not particularly great; maintaining this does not therefore require a great deal of mental energy, and it is rarely something which will make you feel pressurised. Fearless Fear Basic behaviour Adapted behaviour Wants to take the lead Determined Brave Inventive Stubborn Self-sufficient Wants to take the lead Determined Brave Inventive Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 14 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 14 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 15. The playing field By placing the value for each DISC-factor on the respective axis and connecting them with a line, you get a picture of your playing field or the area that your behaviour profile covers. The area with the black border is the playing field for the basic behaviour. and the grey border marks the playing field for the adapted behaviour. By comparing the figures you can see the adaptations you are making (the grey arrows). To make it possible to compare your position with that of others it is possible to reduce the playing field to a single dot, the centre of gravity (or the average influence of all four colours). The black arrow goes from basic to adapted behaviour. (The scale in your individual report is 1:2. In a group report this scale is 1:1.) 1: Natalie Eastwood Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 15 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 15 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 16. Selling with colours Over the last 30 to 40 years, psychology and behavioural science have been applied increasingly often to marketing and sales. A wide range of tests and analytical tools have been developed. These vary considerably: some are easy to use, while others are more complex. Some are useful and reliable, others less so. The methodology described in the book “Selling with colours” is extremely easy to work with, winning the appreciation of thousands of salespersons and sales managers when it comes to preparing, conducting and evaluating sales initiatives. It is also used by many consultants to find the right salesperson for a specific sales task. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 16 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 16 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 17. From unconscious incompetence to unconscious competency Developing as a salesperson is like going on a journey – a journey which normally takes several years. For many salespersons, this is a life-long journey. If you meet an experienced salesperson, you should therefore seize the opportunity to ask what he or she has learnt on this journey. If you want to know what lies ahead, ask the people you meet. While you are still a young and inexperienced salesperson, you do not always notice what mistakes you are making. You are not conscious of your incompetence. Sometimes things work out, sometimes they don’t, and often you don’t understand why. Gradually, you begin to think about the reasons for your success or your lack of results. You start to become aware of your incompetence. At this stage, you begin to question how you plan your work. How you deal with different sales situations. But there are also questions of detail such as how you dress, whether you should keep your beard or shave it off, etc. Most of us find it easy to judge others but more difficult to evaluate our own efforts. In this phase, as in any other, you need feedback from those around you. You also need an open mind, the ability to take onboard the reactions of those around you, and the confidence to ask questions about yourself. Once you are aware of your shortcomings, you are free to decide whether to change your approach or to accept your mistakes and learn to live with them. In this book, we assume that many salespersons are competitive people who want to win, that most of us want to be successful in what we do, and that coming second in a sales situation is usually worthless. Along the journey from unconscious incompetence to unconscious competence, there are a number of stages which you must complete in order to reach your destination. The more you know about yourself, the stronger your starting position If you can assess your own sales style, you will find it easier to evaluate other peoples` styles. It becomes like a form of bird-watching: the more you listen and observe, the more you learn. But instead of binoculars, you need one-hundred percent concentration. There is no single sales style which is more successful than the others, but most people can become good salespersons if they are aware of their own salesstyle, the consequences of this slalesstyyle and what they can do in order to succeed. The goal in to make the active transition from unconscious incompetence to unconscious competence. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 17 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 17 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 18. How you work with the preparation and contact phase The initial contact is of crucial importance to the future purchasing process. Poor preparation – on a number of levels – weakens the initial contact, which becomes ineffective. In order to improve the initial contact, 100% concentration is required. Preparing for sales initiatives In today’s sales work, the customers are fewer and the time spent with each customer is shorter. The customers have more salespersons to choose from, and new technology allows the customers to evaluate an offer in a much more professional manner than before. And on top of this, online sales have just started to take off. Salespersons that spend five days a week on the road for 40 weeks per year hardly exist anymore, and many sales forces have shrunk dramatically. The balance between preparation and implementation has undergone a shift from 70% implementation and 30% preparation to the exact opposite: 70% preparation and 30% implementation. This means that inadequate preparation cannot be compensated for with sales tricks during the actual sales pitch. The question is, of course, whether these sales tricks ever actually worked in the first place. All sales planning starts with an existing sales platform. What have you achieved thus far as a salesperson, and how do you manage what you’ve done correctly? We usually refer to this as results- oriented sales. The most important factors in resultsoriented sales are customer focus, product focus, quantitative effort and qualitative effort. Preparations adapted in line with the customer’s buying style. If you work with a group, the problem can be that everyone has different styles, and an important element of preparation is therefore thinking through everyone’s buying styles. Making the initial contact It is often said that you only get one chance to make a first impression. A relationship which begins with a poor first impression can of course be worked on and gradually improved, but with sales there is a risk that you will never get a second chance to make up for a bad first impression. If as a salesperson you are good at making a first impression, you have a great advantage. It can be hard to say what exactly this ability consists of; salespersons may have very different styles and still succeed in making a good first impression. Preparations are important to you. You are often straightforward in your message You normally think clearly when planning and are not afraid of bringing up issues which may be seen as controversial. You think that it is better to deal with it now rather than waiting for an answer later You are an optimistic and influential salesperson who is clear about what is being sold, especially if the customer interests you You normally always have a good solution for how to begin the customer meeting. You are able to capture the attention of those around you with both your statements and your questions You want the preparatory work to be carried out in a safe and secure manner. This creates confidence and good customer relationships People who work with you appreciate your friendly and secure manner Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 18 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 18 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 19. How you work with the needs analysis phase Understanding the customer's situation lies at the heart of all selling. Consciously mapping the customer's needs leads to these being developed. Consciously listening influences the customer more than presenting arguments. Influencing the customer’s needs The most important phase in the sales process is the needs analysis. It is here you will find a basis on which to build your continued sales. It is in this phase that you decide your future strategy, selection of offerings, etc. It is also in this phase that the customer becomes aware of their need for your products and services, and it is in this phase that the decision is made which determines whether the customer’s experience of need is so strong that it is sufficient to close the deal. The needs phase consists largely of questions which you ask the customer, and it is therefore possible to get the impression that the needs phase exists only in order for the salesperson to collect information to formulate an offer and to choose the future sales strategy. It is of course important that, as far as possible, you take the customer’s situation as your starting point. The chance of winning an order obviously increases the better a proposal is adapted to suit the customer’s situation. How the customer regards their situation is a question of experience, and experience can be influenced. This influence comes into play during the presentation phase when you present the arguments in favour of your proposal, and even more so during the needs phase. This is because there is no better way to influence the customer than to ask questions. Remember not to ask too many uncomfortable questions Give and take so that the customer feels at ease during the needs analysis You often feel positive and secure in the needs analysis. Remember that the focus should not just be on the situation being pleasant. You also need to ask the right questions You are flexible when it comes to asking questions. Remember not to lose the thread You have an open attitude towards the customer’s problems and want to help resolve them You may need to think through what the aim of the customer visit is: to sell or to help!? Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 19 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 19 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 20. How you work with the presentation phase A good presentation will strengthen the customer’s feeling of need. The presentation should have four clear objectives (the right proposal - the right group - the right backing - the right agenda). Presentations should not be prepared the day before but in advance, in order to achieve the objective – sufficient backing. Presentation of the solution What does a cleaner do? He or she cleans. But what do they really do? Well, they create a pleasant working environment. They ensure that the office functions. They affect the employees’ motivation and effectiveness. They are a crucial element in getting the office to function properly. When you sell a machine for cleaning, what are you actually selling? Is it the machine’s performance and properties? Or is it the advantages of the machine and its exclusive features? Or is it the benefit the customer can get from the machine when using it? No customer is actually interested in the properties or advantages of a product or service. What is of interest to them is instead the return the customer gets from the product or the service. What the product or the service does is uninteresting. What it provides is of crucial importance. You like to give a direct and straightforward presentation with a clear image of what you believe needs to be done The customer may sometimes feel that you are overdoing it a little when you present your solution You are extroverted and demonstrate engaging empathy when you give a presentation You will be more successful once you have linked the presentation together with the needs analysis You want to be helpful and obliging when you present your solutions to the customer You may need to think about whether it is always worth being so obliging Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 20 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 20 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 21. How you work with the closure phase Closure starts at the precise moment when you decide to deal with a customer. Throughout the sales process you can take a number of measures in order to steer the customer towards making a decision. The actual closure methods used must be carefully adapted to suit the customer in question, in order to avoid having a negative effect. Implementing the closure phase There are few areas in personal sales which are surrounded with as many myths as closure. Many salespersons dream about finding the perfect method that allows them to succeed using a smart closure technique. A phrase to use when booking visits for example, which will persuade those customers who are difficult to approach to agree to a meeting, or a simple method that will get customers to accept a high price. Unfortunately, there are few special closure methods; most are a case of common sence and placing yourself in the customer’s decision-making position, thus understanding how you might be able to influence it. Closure is therefore not governed by some clever method that you can apply at the end of the sales process. Closure begins when you decide to make contact with the customer, and continues throughout the entire sales process. You can sometimes be seen as too direct when it comes to closing the deal Don’t scare the customer off with your directness You can sometimes believe that the customer is more positively disposed towards your proposal than is actually the case Before summarising and moving on to close the deal, you should check things off with the customer You have a tendency to take a little too much on to close a deal You may sometimes need to stop and evaluate the entire deal before going along with the customer’s demands Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 21 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 21 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 22. Prominent qualities in your behavioural style Qualities which can be seen in both your basic behaviour and your adapted behaviour are qualities which you often use. These qualities often become permanent over time. The qualities are presented on a falling scale, with the most prominent quality appearing first and the least prominent quality appearing last (see appendix for more information about all qualities). Assertive Assertive people have good self-confidence and rarely doubt themselves when it comes to contact with other people. They appreciate social situations and like to interact with others on a more personal level. They also find it easy to mix with strangers, and are often the ones who take the initiative to make contact in such situations. They are not necessarily obstinate, normally preferring to keep things on a more open and friendly level. Influential Communication is important to influential people. They are open and extroverted in their manner, but they may find it hard to concentrate on everyday tasks. They are easily distracted when the opportunity for social interaction arises. They give the impression of security and, with their lively manner, they find it easy to influence others without appearing obstinate. Enthusiastic Enthusiastic people are friendly and extroverted. They like a fast pace. Their eager attitude clearly shows their commitment to an issue. Their enthusiasm often helps to instil job satisfaction and motivation in those around them. Firm Principled people stick to their word and like to do what they have promised. They may find it hard to adapt to new situations, and prefer to have set routines and working methods to follow. They are highly loyal to the present and to the people in their immediate environment. They may be resistant when faced with changes, and need time to adapt. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 22 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 22 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 23. Prominent qualities in your behavioural style, continued... Patient Patient people often appreciate open and friendly relationships with others, and rarely feel hurried. They prefer to work at their own pace, and are persistent and tenacious. When they are assigned a task, they also ensure that it is completed. They can therefore work well in situations which others would find monotonous or boring. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 23 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 23 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 24. Prominent qualities Here, the intensity of the twelve qualities which are associated with the colours are shown in a bar chart. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 24 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 24 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 25. Qualities presented in diagram form 1: Performance oriented 2: Self-motivating 3: Independent 4: Influential 5: Enthusiastic 6: Assertive 7: Patient 8: Thoughtful 9: Firm 10: Co-operative 11: Cautious 12: Perceptive A =  Prominent qualities: Prominent in both basic behaviour and adapted behaviour. Displayed in various situations, and become permanent over time. B =  Situation-dependent qualities: Prominent in adapted behaviour, but not in basic behaviour. Remain prominent as long as the perceived situation prevails. C =  Hidden qualities: Rarely displayed in either basic behaviour or adapted behaviour. D =  Unexploited qualities: Prominent in basic behaviour, but not used in the adapted behaviour. Displayed under calm and relaxed circumstances, and under pressure. The dotted diagonal line in the graph shows the intensity of the prominent qualities from 0 – 100%. Qualities located to the right of the dotted line indicate that they are more prominent in the adapted behaviour than in the basic behaviour. The opposite applies when the qualities are located on the left side of the dotted diagonal line. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 25 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 25 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 26. Introduction : Carrot Why is it important to know what motivates an employee? Simply because motivation is about personal values and about what is meaningful in life. Different individuals see things differently. For employees to be motivated, the environment and salary system in the workplace must support people's personal driving forces. Motivation is about winning employees’ "hearts", not appealing to their intelligence! Is capital punishment right or wrong? Should we apply gender quotas when recruiting? Is it good or bad if a person is interested in power and personal success? These are all emotive questions. There are arguments both for and against. A value is a fundamental conviction that involves judgments and assessments it indicates what is right/wrong/desirable it tends to be relatively stable and lasting it is established early in life through the influence of parents, teachers, friends and others guidance on preferred behaviour, both from a personal and a social perspective Attitudes are a measure of our state of mind, our views and judgements on the world we live in. They reflect the point of view we have adopted on the basis of our values and are more flexible than values. An attitude involves emotive statements on things/occurrences, events or people. ”I like my job” is an example of an attitude I may have towards my work. Attitudes consist of three components: A cognitive component: a conscious thought, e.g., ”It’s wrong to discriminate against people on grounds of race, sex or religion.” An emotional component: an emotional content, e.g. ”I don’t like my boss because he discriminates .....” A behavioural component: an intention to behave in a certain way in relation to something/someone, e.g. ”I avoid the boss because he discriminates .....” Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 26 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 27. Introduction : Carrot, continued... Attitudes fulfil various functions for an individual: Attitudes give meaning to life (knowledge). Politics or religious ideologies often fulfil this function. Attitudes help us express ourselves. They help us define who we are and thereby make us feel good Attitudes also have an instrumental function. We make use of certain attitudes because we think we will be rewarded or punished, e.g. when we flatter someone, or when we keep our ideas to ourselves if we think our opinions may be unpopular. Attitudes defend our ego. We can use an attitude to justify an action that would otherwise make us feel guilty. We may, for example, have conflicting feelings towards a parent or a partner, though our values tell us that we must love them wholeheartedly. Research shows that people strive to achieve agreement between their attitudes (driving forces) and their behaviour and wish to appear rational and consistent. We feel uncomfortable when this is not possible. We try to recover the balance between attitudes and behaviour through changing either our attitudes or our behaviour. When fundamental values and attitudes of indivuals are known, it is possible to predict their behaviour and understand why they behave as they do. An employee normally has a higher level of performance and satisfaction if his/her values agree with those of the organisation. Leaders may try and act in such a way as to create positive attitudes towards work. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 27 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 28. Description of the seven driving forces Individuals whose main driving force is knowledge are mainly interested in discovery, fact-finding and information. ”It is a pleasure to know things!” These individuals like to adopt contemplative attitudes and often ignore an object's beauty, practical use or financial value. Individuals whose driving force is knowledge want to find and understand the relationships between things. They observe reality through critical and rational eyes. Individuals whose main driving force is economic have a strong interest in money. They focus on profitability and want to see financial returns on their investments. Investments can be in the form of both time and money. People whose driving force is financial strive to achieve the security brought by financial success. They may feel the need to outdo others when it comes to financial and material success. Individuals whose main driving force is self-fulfilment are keenly interested in personal development and wellbeing. People who are driven by self-fulfilment value environments which leave room for creativity and innovative thinking. The need for personal development may be expressed as a wish to put one's own or other people's ideas to the test. Internal reflection and feedback are natural working methods, which means that these individuals will appreciate environments which allow this. Individuals whose main driving force is practical appreciate careful creation and a sensible use of resources. Manufacture and creation are key concepts in this driving force. People with a practical driving force have an eye for things which may come in handy and be put to practical use. They are often good with their hands and have the capacity to start up, manage and complete projects. They like to show others what they have produced or created. Individuals whose main driving force is consideration are interested in other people, their teamwork and their wellbeing. They are often seen as friendly, pleasant and unselfish. They are occasionally willing to sacrifice their own profit (making money) if it would turn out to be a loss to someone else. People who have such a strong sense of consideration may feel that people who are driven by forces such as knowledge, practicality and leadership are indifferent and insensitive. Individuals whose main driving forces are power - influence seek control and power. The need for control can be expressed in different ways, partly as self-control and partly as control over other people. Individuals whose driving force is leadership look above all for personal power, influence and praise. With influential people it is often important to understand the ground rules and maintain a good relationship. Their driving force can also be expressed as a desire to control important decisions and decide when and how resources are to be used. Individuals with an ethical - moral driving force are characterised by a desire for justice. This can appear as a wish to work in organisations with clear structures, rules and common standards and values. The main interest behind this can be described as wanting to support the "good forces" behind the organisation or the society as a whole. Individuals with a strong ethical-moral drive have an overarching set of values for what is right and wrong, which they use as a guiding light. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 28 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 29. On the basis of your answers in the analysis, you have obtained the following percentage distribution of the various driving forces. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 29 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 30. Your strongest driving force: Self-fulfilment Individuals with self-fulfilment as a strong driving force have a great interest in personal development and well-being. An individual with self-fulfilment as his/her driving force values environments that allow space for creativity and fresh ideas. Personal development can take the form of a wish for space to try out one’s own or others’ ideas. Contemplation and feedback is a natural working method. That means that individuals appreciate surroundings that allow time and space for that. Standard marks denoting driving forces: see work as a way of fulfilling themselves expressive and communicative as far as innovation is concerned can become passive and evasive in situations that involve personal failure or discomfort appreciate people who express their creativity Example of overuse of driving force: their own development can be at the expense of the job/unit excessively broad and “over the top ideas” where risk assessment is weak do not listen to suggestions from those around them Situations or factors that can lead to discomfort or stress: people who only value a rational, objective approach perceived obstacles to personal development when those around them are critical of ideas or unwilling to listen to them when the strongest driving forces are not fulfilled, the individual will show some lack of interest. Important things you can convey to those around you which increase your motivation: encourage your wish for personal development see your suggestions for change as a positive contribution to the job understand that not everything has an answer and allow time for consideration and reflection that you can work in open, sympathetic surroundings where people can express themselves freely allow you access to training so you can continue with your personal development Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 30 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 31. Your second strongest driving force: Practical Individuals with a strong practical driving force value practical creation and sensible use of resources. To make and to create are the key concepts in this driving force. Individuals whose driving force is practical have an eye for things that can be of practical use. They are often dexterous and have the ability to start, carry on and complete projects. They like to show others what they have produced and made. Standard marks denoting driving forces: they prefer to plan a process according to their own practical experience have the ability to identify how resources can be used in the best way can sometimes exceed financial constraints in the planning and performance of a project in order to obtain a better, more durable result Example of overuse of driving force: can act as a "slave driver" in order to implement a project can in certain circumstances allow functionality to take precedence over finance and form the "can do it yourself" principle can become too explicit Situations or factors that can lead to discomfort or stress: when the project does not keep to established timetables when the job is more difficult than planned and sufficient resources are not available when others do not perceive a project to be successful, despite the fact that it actually works when the strongest driving forces are not fulfilled, the individual will show some lack of interest. Important things you can convey to those around you which increase your motivation: appreciate and value results and functionality allow you to contribute with practical points of view when planning and implementing a project do not just value good investments in terms of money or form allow you to take part in the planning and performance of projects and processes of a practical nature show appreciation for and recognition of your experience and your practical skills Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 31 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 32. Your third strongest driving force: Ethical - Moral An individual with an ethical - moral driving force has a pronounced sense of fairness. This may take the form of a wish to work in organisations with clear structures, rules and mutual standards and values. The primary interest behind this driving force can be described as a wish to support the "forces of good" in work or in society as a whole. Individuals with a strong ethical - moral driving force have an overriding system of values relating to what is "right and wrong", which they use as a guiding star. Standard marks denoting driving forces: have a clear system of values decision-making is based on a clearly expressed system of values defend values that are essential for a “good” organisation Example of overuse of driving force: may come into conflict with excessively greedy surroundings can be something of a "guardian of virtue" can in certain circumstances be perceived as a person who judges others by his/her own standards Situations or factors that can lead to discomfort or stress: unethical business transactions unfair treatment of employees decisions in which it is impossible to identify the consequences for yourself or for others when the strongest driving forces are not fulfilled, the individual will show some lack of interest. Important things you can convey to those around you which increase your motivation: do not omit or distort facts that could undermine an organisation’s good image be clear on how people are to interact so that everyone can do his/her best and achieve mutual success allows you to take part in an activity that contributes to creating a better world for everyone that your company has clear values and where you practice what you preach openness and honest discussion of difficult issues involving ethics or morals Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 32 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 33. Your fourth strongest driving force: Consideration Individuals with consideration as their driving force are interested in other people and their interaction and well-being. They are often seen as friendly, sympathetic and unselfish. Sometimes they are prepared to refrain from personal gain (of earning money) if it is apparent that a decision involves or may involve a loss for others. An individual with strong consideration as his driving force can perceive people with knowledge, practical and leadership as their driving forces to be unconcerned and insensitive. Standard marks denoting driving forces: likes to be of assistance to others can spend too much time and energy on "good causes" would rather see the "good" than the "evil" in people Example of overuse of driving force: may come into conflict with more rational decision makers, particularly if someone suffers damage or gets caught in between can occasionally be exploited takes things too personally Situations or factors that can lead to discomfort or stress: decisions taken only on rational and financial grounds decisions that cause human loss which is greater than the economic gain not too feel good enough when the strongest driving forces are not fulfilled, the individual will show some lack of interest. Important things you can convey to those around you which increase your motivation: not to be selfish and wish only to ”profit” from others’ work and efforts focus on how everyone can do themselves justice and how we can create a more equitable working situation emphasise interaction between people; everyone is needed and has an important part to play allows you the opportunity to be of assistance to others you can work in a climate that is humane and that takes people into consideration be part of a considerate group/company Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 33 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 34. Description of various combinations of driving forces Practical/Self-fulfilment practical creation is self-fulfilment discovering practical solutions to a problem is a pleasure in itself problem-solving works best in an open, creative environment   Self-fulfilment/ Ethical - Moral personal development is about creating a good reputation creativity and fresh ideas can be used to create common basic values everyone has the ability to become a "better" person   Self-fulfilment/Consideration helping others is a way of achieving self-development my personal development and success must not be at the expense of others what is good for me is not necessarily good for others   Practical/ Ethical - Moral develop routines to guarantee that things are done in a morally defensible way good behaviour is valid even in minor everyday situations resources must be used in a way that is fair for all parties   Practical/Consideration available resources must be used fairly even small improvements can make life easier for people close cooperation creates both good relationships and durable practical solutions   Ethical - Moral/Consideration we all have a duty to help people in difficulties we must show solidarity in order to create a better world business transactions must be for the use and pleasure of both parties Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 34 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 35. Red behavioural style with different driving forces Self-fulfilment A Red person with a self-fulfilment driving force is happiest with tasks that challenge his or her personal limits. Such people may be proponents of internal skills development, both their own and others’. Practical A Red person with a concern for utility (Practical) as a driving force often has a hands-on attitude to problem-solving. Such people trust their previous experience and do not hesitate to pull up their sleeves and get their hands dirty. Ethical - Moral Red people with an ethical/moral driving force retain their forcefulness and goal-orientation. They may be committed and driving, regarding ethical behaviour, and often seem overly honest in business transactions. They can also hold leading positions in politics and non-profit organisations. Consideration The Consideration driving force softens the dominant character of Red people. While the person may still be perceived as dominant, behind the dominant façade lie good intentions. Power - Influence A Red person with the driving force of Power - Influence wants to have control over the situation. Such people endeavour to acquire a position in the organisation in which they work, and in society generally. They often have a large network of influential people. Knowledge Red people are naturally driven and competitive. With knowledge as their driving force, they often assume the role of “expert,” doling out weighty explanations of how everything fits together and how a problem is to be solved. They often have difficulty accepting counterarguments. Economic Red people with an economic driving force are prone to making sure that whatever is good for the company has financial benefits for themselves as well. May be daring risk-takers in business deals. (White fields apply to your profile while gray fields does not apply.) Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 35 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 36. Yellow behavioural style with different driving forces Self-fulfilment Yellow people with self-fulfilment as their driving force are happiest in creative environments that welcome innovation and a desire to experiment. They do not necessarily care whether the “experiments” are financially viable or practically useful. Practical Yellow people with a practical driving force have an ability to find creative solutions using existing resources. They often enjoy crafts and may have an artistic bent. They are keen to display their work for others. Ethical - Moral A Yellow person with an Ethical/Moral driving force can be a powerful fighter for justice and equality in the organisation of which they are a part. They usetheir strong communication skills to gather support for their opinions. Consideration The driving force of a Yellow person may show itself in a habit of encouraging the working group or the department to celebrate its triumphs and applauding strong performance. They are often the ones who remember birthdays and other such anniversaries. Power - Influence Yellow people are natural communicators. With Power - Influence as their driving force, they prefer to be on the scene where the decisions are made. They have a knack of creating networks of influential people. Knowledge Yellow people with knowledge as their driving force can be unusually focused,well-read and convincing on topics that interest them. They use knowledge to flesh out the ideas they want others to support. Economic Yellow people with an economic driving force are conscious of the financial return their ideas may generate. They often use this as an argument to persuade others to support their projects and are hopeful that their project will generate profit for themselves. (White fields apply to your profile while gray fields does not apply.) Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 36 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 37. Green behavioural style with different driving forces Self-fulfilment Green people with Self-fulfilment as their driving force are often interested in “the human aspect” of life. For example, they might devote themselves to adult education courses and mental well-being Practical Green people with a concern for utility (Practical) as their driving force are usually good at planning and organising their own work within their working group. They can see the best way to use resources – in a project, for instance. Ethical - Moral Green people with an Ethical/Moral driving force work for the fair treatment of all employees. They may be the ones to actively promote equality issues. Consideration Green people with Consideration as their driving force enjoy working in a team. They are trustworthy and helpful. They are often active in aid and supportorganisations. Power - Influence Green people with Power - Influence as their driving force can be extremely skilful leaders. They are often consistent in their leadership style and can be extremely stubborn and resilient. They are likely to make considerate decisions. Knowledge Green people with knowledge as their driving force actively seek information before they adopt new procedures and techniques. They prefer to use their Knowledge to develop successful procedures and routines for their area of operations. Economic Green people with an Economic driving force prefer to implement well-planned, secure investments. They are economical in how they use resources and tend to think carefully about how to attain the best return of investment. (White fields apply to your profile while gray fields does not apply.) Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 37 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 38. Blue behavioural style with different driving forces Self-fulfilment Blue people with Self-fulfilment as their driving force tend to be perfectionists. They can devote a great deal of time to developing, say, a system, to perfection. Practical A Blue person for whom a concern for utility (Practical) is their driving force is often a methodical person who does not leave anything to chance. Such people have a good sense of how a resource can be used reliably and in the manner that best serves the purpose. Ethical - Moral Blue people with an Ethical/Moral driving force are keenly aware of rules and regulations. They want everyone to meet high quality standards, and strive to promote honesty in business transactions. Consideration Blue people with Consideration as their driving force are happy to lend a helping hand to anyone who might need it. This is often expressed more in the form of practical guidance than emotional support. Power - Influence Blue people with Power - Influence as their driving force focus strongly on ensuring that all work performed is of a high standard. They may impose extremely high demands on staff-members or colleagues. Knowledge Blue people for whom knowledge is their driving force are often the true experts in their field. They may present well-argued “proof” of their opinions and often ask critical questions. Economic Blue people with an Economic driving force tend to carefully weigh the pros and cons before making any investments. They prefer to invest in quality products that last a long time. (White fields apply to your profile while gray fields does not apply.) Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 38 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 39. Appendix Explanations of the 12 qualities relation to the DISC-colours Performance oriented Achieving results is important to performance-oriented people. They may compromise on quality or details in order to achieve their goals. They are direct in their manner of communicating with others and they are able to assert their views effectively. However, they are not particularly interested in personal matters. Nor do they take an objective position and they are highly goal-oriented. They can make quick decisions without allowing themselves to be distracted.   Self-motivating For self-motivated people, personal success is important. They are not particularly patient, preferring to see immediate results. They are easily irritated by others who cannot or do not want to keep up with their fast pace. They can absorb new information easily without losing sight of the goal. They take responsibility for their actions and are not afraid of confrontations. High levels of pressure are a natural feature of everyday life for them.   Independent Independent people are highly self-sufficient and up-front. They prefer to go their own way, and are happiest when they do not need to take others into consideration. They are frustrated by rules and regulations which restrict their freedom of action. They may sometimes need to break rules and regulations in order to achieve results. They are highly competitive and always know where they are headed.   Influential Communication is important to influential people. They are open and extroverted in their manner, but they may find it hard to concentrate on everyday tasks. They are easily distracted when the opportunity for social interaction arises. They give the impression of security and, with their lively manner, they find it easy to influence others without appearing obstinate. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 39 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 40. Appendix, continued... Enthusiastic Enthusiastic people are friendly and extroverted. They like a fast pace. Their eager attitude clearly shows their commitment to an issue. Their enthusiasm often helps to instil job satisfaction and motivation in those around them.   Assertive Assertive people have good self-confidence and rarely doubt themselves when it comes to contact with other people. They appreciate social situations and like to interact with others on a more personal level. They also find it easy to mix with strangers, and are often the ones who take the initiative to make contact in such situations. They are not necessarily obstinate, normally preferring to keep things on a more open and friendly level.   Patient Patient people often appreciate open and friendly relationships with others, and rarely feel hurried. They prefer to work at their own pace, and are persistent and tenacious. When they are assigned a task, they also ensure that it is completed. They can therefore work well in situations which others would find monotonous or boring.   Thoughtful Thoughtful people prefer to have time to think through an issue before deciding for themselves how they will deal with it. Before speaking, they choose their words carefully and plan their actions. Before making a final decision, they like to check what they are thinking with their colleagues. They may find it hard to meet time limits and deadlines. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 40 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk
  • 41. Appendix, continued... Firm Principled people stick to their word and like to do what they have promised. They may find it hard to adapt to new situations, and prefer to have set routines and working methods to follow. They are highly loyal to the present and to the people in their immediate environment. They may be resistant when faced with changes, and need time to adapt.   Co-operative It is important for co-operative people to know their own authority and rights, and those of others. They support their views with rules and procedures. They like to get support from employees and colleagues before making important decisions. As a result, they like to be included in a working party. By working with others, they avoid personal risk-taking and the responsibility is shared with a number of other people.   Cautious Cautious people find it hard to admit to a mistake, and therefore take care to check their work so that no errors creep in. They have a real need for security, and prefer to avoid all risk-taking. If an issue cannot be supported with facts, they may prefer not to deal with it rather than risking negative results. They are cautious when it comes to giving out information, and may find it hard to turn their ideas into actions or communicate them to others if they are not encouraged to do so.   Perceptive Perceptive people have a strong feeling for what happens within their immediate surroundings and the changes which take place there. They often take note of things which other people don’t even notice or care about. However, they may also become bored or distracted easily. They prefer to check that no mistakes are made. They can sometimes be sensitive to other people’s views, and can easily feel that they are being criticised. Feedback is only to be handled by Ensize UK Michelle Mills-Porter michelle@ensize.com www.ensize.com All Content Copyright Ensize © 2015 41 This report belongs to Natalie Eastwood natalie@wiredmarketing.co.uk

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