Nathan Miller
 A highly lethal virus that causes massive internal
hemorrhaging,1976, named for Ebola River valley in Con
go, where it...
 I chose this topic because I feel that it could
possible effect us in the near future.
 We should care because the vi...
 The Ebola River is located in the northern part of the
Democratic Republic of Congo.
 Ebola virus is named after this...
 This river was earlier named Zaire River
during 1971 to 1997 based on the then
government called Zaire.
 The Zaire o...
 There are five different sub-types of Ebola in
the world today.
 They are named by the location they were
identified...
 It is endemic in the Democratic Republic of the
Congo, Gabon, or the Republic of the Congo.
 It has a genomic sequenc...
 The species was introduced in 1998 as Sudan
Ebola Virus.
 It is endemic in Sudan and Uganda.
 It has a genomic sequ...
 BDBV made its first appearance on August 1 of 2007, when
a viral hemorrhagic fever outbreak began in the
Bundibugyo an...
 Reston virus is named after Reston, Virginia, US,
where the virus was first discovered.
 Despite its status as a leve...
 The species was introduced in 1998 as Cote d'Ivoire Ebola
virus.
 The name was proposed to be changed to Tai Forest
...
79%
53%
27%
0% 0%
Zaire
Ebolavirus
Sudan
Ebolavirus
Bundibugyo
Ebolavirus
Reston
Ebolavirus
Tai Forest
Ebolav...
 Ebola symptoms can take as long as three
weeks to appear. Disease symptoms
include:
 Diarrhea
 Fever
 Headache
...
 The virus is known as a “zoonotic” virus because it’s
transmitted to humans from animals.
 Since people may handle th...
 Once people become infected with Ebola, they
can transmit it to others if people come in
contact with their:
 breast...
 Ebola patients become walking human-to-human virus
transmitters as soon as they begin to show symptoms, and remain
con...
 To prevent the spread of the disease, they must train
medical staff, test crisis plans, and communicate with the
publi...
 The decline is a consequence of the recession, which cut tax revenue
to state and local governments, and the drive for ...
 The Ebola virus outbreak that’s ravaging West Africa
probably started with a single infected person, a new
genetic ana...
 In Sierra Leone, it started with a traditional healer,
says virologist Robert Garry of Tulane University, one
of the r...
 The Ebola virus does not have a cure or vaccine at this time.
 Instead, measures are taken to keep the person as comfo...
 When it is known that someone has come in contact
with another person, or that a person has the Ebola
Virus, safety me...
 Ebola is a rare but deadly virus that causes bleeding
inside of and outside the body.
 As the virus spreads through t...
 Losing about a fifth or more of the normal amount of
blood in your body causes hypovolemic shock.
 Hypovolemic shock ...
 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000167.htm
 http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/wher...
Nathan m ebola
Nathan m ebola
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Nathan m ebola

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nathan m ebola

  • 1. Nathan Miller
  • 2.  A highly lethal virus that causes massive internal hemorrhaging,1976, named for Ebola River valley in Con go, where it was first studied.  This virus was originally not in the U.S, but now there are a few cases of people being diagnosed with it in the U.S.
  • 3.  I chose this topic because I feel that it could possible effect us in the near future.  We should care because the virus has been brought to the U.S and now it has the possibility to spread throughout the U.S.
  • 4.  The Ebola River is located in the northern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Ebola virus is named after this river since this was the first place where the virus was discovered.  The virus, when it was discovered, had spread to around 55 villages situated around the banks of the river.
  • 5.  This river was earlier named Zaire River during 1971 to 1997 based on the then government called Zaire.  The Zaire or Congo River, which is now known as the Ebola River, is in Western Central Africa and it is the largest river in Western Central Africa.
  • 6.  There are five different sub-types of Ebola in the world today.  They are named by the location they were identified in.  They are:  Zaire ebolavirus  Sudan ebolavirus  Bundibugyo ebolavirus  Reston ebolavirus  Tai Forest ebolavirus
  • 7.  It is endemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, or the Republic of the Congo.  It has a genomic sequence that differs from the type virus by less than 30%.  The Zaire strain of the Ebola Virus is the deadliest.
  • 8.  The species was introduced in 1998 as Sudan Ebola Virus.  It is endemic in Sudan and Uganda.  It has a genomic sequence different from Ebola virus by greater than 30%.
  • 9.  BDBV made its first appearance on August 1 of 2007, when a viral hemorrhagic fever outbreak began in the Bundibugyo and Kikyo townships of Bundibugyo district in western Uganda.  The outbreak of this type was declared over on February 20, 2008, and then a second outbreak of it started in August of 2012 in Province Orientale, DRC.
  • 10.  Reston virus is named after Reston, Virginia, US, where the virus was first discovered.  Despite its status as a level-4 organism, Reston virus is non-pathogenic to humans, though hazardous to monkeys.  The Ebola-Reston virus is also the only subtype that will not cause illness in humans—it only affects animals.
  • 11.  The species was introduced in 1998 as Cote d'Ivoire Ebola virus.  The name was proposed to be changed to Tai Forest ebolavirus in 2010 and this proposal was immediately accepted by the ICTV.  It is classified as a Tai Forest species if it has a genomic sequence different than ebolavirus by 30% and different than the genomic sequence of Tai Forest virus by less than 30%.
  • 12. 79% 53% 27% 0% 0% Zaire Ebolavirus Sudan Ebolavirus Bundibugyo Ebolavirus Reston Ebolavirus Tai Forest Ebolavirus
  • 13.  Ebola symptoms can take as long as three weeks to appear. Disease symptoms include:  Diarrhea  Fever  Headache  Muscle pain  Stomach pain  Vomiting  Unexplained bleeding or bruising
  • 14.  The virus is known as a “zoonotic” virus because it’s transmitted to humans from animals.  Since people may handle these infected animals, the virus can be transmitted via the animal’s blood and body fluids.  Humans can also transfer the virus to each other.
  • 15.  Once people become infected with Ebola, they can transmit it to others if people come in contact with their:  breast milk  feces  saliva  semen  sweat  urine  vomit
  • 16.  Ebola patients become walking human-to-human virus transmitters as soon as they begin to show symptoms, and remain contagious even after death.  Everyone they come in contact with has to be monitored or they could end up spreading the virus to more people.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0Q0yA_jJ2U
  • 17.  To prevent the spread of the disease, they must train medical staff, test crisis plans, and communicate with the public.  All that must be accomplished by a public health workforce diminished by years of budget cuts.  City, county, and state health departments employ almost 60,000 fewer people than they did in 2008, a drop of almost 20%.
  • 18.  The decline is a consequence of the recession, which cut tax revenue to state and local governments, and the drive for austerity in Congress, which has led to lower federal spending on health preparedness.  In 2007 the two federal programs that help local officials plan for public health emergencies—Public Health Emergency Preparedness grants and the Hospital Preparedness Program—gave states and cities $1.3 billion, according to the National Association of County and City Health Officials. For the budget year that began on Oct. 1, that shrank to $800 million.  www.businessweek.com/videos/2014-10-15/ebola-failure-whos-in- charge-here-no-one
  • 19.  The Ebola virus outbreak that’s ravaging West Africa probably started with a single infected person, a new genetic analysis shows.  This West African variant can be traced genetically to a single introduction, perhaps a person infected by a bat, researchers report in the journal Science.
  • 20.  In Sierra Leone, it started with a traditional healer, says virologist Robert Garry of Tulane University, one of the researchers on the report. The healer treated patients from across the border in Guinea, where an outbreak of Ebola had started in February. Her patients flocked to her funeral, and 14 became infected as they prepared and buried the healer’s body, Garry said.
  • 21.  The Ebola virus does not have a cure or vaccine at this time.  Instead, measures are taken to keep the person as comfortable as possible.  Supportive care measures include:  Giving medications to maintain blood pressure.  Managing electrolyte balances.  Providing extra oxygen, if needed.  Providing intravenous fluids to prevent dehydration.  Treating co-existing infections and preventing other infections from occurring.
  • 22.  When it is known that someone has come in contact with another person, or that a person has the Ebola Virus, safety measures are greatly taken.  They isolate this person and closely monitor them keeping them out of contact with anyone else for a certain period of time.
  • 23.  Ebola is a rare but deadly virus that causes bleeding inside of and outside the body.  As the virus spreads through the body, it damages the immune system and organs.  Ultimately, it causes levels of blood-clotting cells to drop. This leads to severe, uncontrollable bleeding.  http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/ebola-fever-virus- infection
  • 24.  Losing about a fifth or more of the normal amount of blood in your body causes hypovolemic shock.  Hypovolemic shock is an emergency condition in which severe blood and fluid loss make the heart unable to pump enough blood to the body. This type of shock can cause many organs to stop working.
  • 25.  http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000167.htm  http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/where-did-ebola-come-likely- one-person-gene-study-finds-n191161  http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs103/en/  http://www.healthline.com/health/ebola-hemorrhagic-fever#Treatments6  http://www.rocketswag.com/medicine/disease-prevention/infectious-diseases/ virus/ebola/Where-Is-The-Ebola-River-Located.html  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zaire_ebolavirus  http://www.popsci.com/article/science/how-did-deadliest-strain-ebola-travel-central- west-africa  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bundibugyo_virus  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reston_virus  http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/ebola-fever-virus-infection  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ta%C3%AF_Forest_ebolavirus

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