HCBS Settings Rule
An Opportunity to Advance Integrated Community Living
Overview of CMS 2249-F and 2296-F
Title:
Medicaid Program; State Plan Home and Community-Based
Services, 5-Year Period for...
Highlights
• Defines, describes, and aligns home and community-based
setting requirements across three Medicaid authoritie...
What CMS intends
• The home and community-based setting requirements
establish an outcome oriented definition that focuses...
The Main ideas
• HCB Settings Characteristics
– What are NOT home and community-based
– What are presumed not to be HCBS
–...
What is NOT HCBS is a short list
• Settings that are NOT Home and Community-based:
– Nursing facility
– Institution for me...
Settings PRESUMED not to be HCBS
• Settings in a publicly or privately-owned facility providing
inpatient treatment
• Sett...
Qualities of an HCBS Setting
The Home and Community-Based setting:
• Is integrated in and supports access to the greater
c...
Mandatory qualities
• The setting is selected by the individual from among setting
options, including non-disability speci...
Further qualities
• Ensures an individual’s rights of privacy, dignity,
respect, and freedom from coercion and restraint
•...
Home and Community-Based Setting Requirements for
Provider-Owned or Controlled Residential Settings
• Specific unit/dwelli...
Other requirements in provider owned or controlled
• Each individual has privacy in their sleeping or living unit
• Units ...
Rules cover Non-Residential services as well
• CMS will release guidance for bringing
non-residential services and setting...
Transition Planning
• For NEW 1915(c) HCBS waivers or 1915(i) HCBS State Plan
benefits to be approved, states must ensure ...
1915(i) state plan amendments
For renewals and amendments to existing 1915(i) state plan
benefits submitted within one yea...
Statewide Transition Plan
For ALL existing 1915(c) HCBS waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State
Plan benefits in the state, the sta...
By March 16, 2015
When a state DOES NOT renew or amend an existing 1915(c)
HCBS waiver or 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefit ...
Approaching Transition Planning
• CMS has not released guidance on developing the Transition Plan. So
what are states doin...
Stakeholder involvement
• The process of self-assessment is best conducted with
stakeholders including self-advocates, fam...
Here are some of the components to consider in assessing
infrastructure and need for modifications:
1. Service definitions...
Public Input is Required
• Under 1915(c) rules, waiver amendments and renewals
must be posted for 30 day public comment
• ...
Public Comment Requirements
• The state must provide at a minimum 2 statements of
public notice and public input procedure...
Person Centered Planning in Official
Regulations
• Person-centered planning has been incorporated in the
delivery of servi...
Coherence with ACA
• On June 6, 2014 Secretary Sebelius signed guidance to HHS
agencies on standards for person-centered p...
ACA 2402(a)
• Section 2402(a) of the Affordable Care Act requires the
Secretary to ensure all states receiving federal fun...
2402(a)
• Outlines the standards for person-centered planning (PCP)
and self-direction (SD) that should be reflected in al...
2402(a)
• The guidance for the steps in the PCP process, as well as
the steps that must be taken when a person’s services ...
HCBS Settings Rule: STEPS
• The person-centered plan process has 5 steps:
• Independent evaluation and determination of el...
Independent Evaluation / Eligibility
• Evaluation of the individual’s eligibility for the state plan
benefit is performed ...
Independent Assessment
• The supports and services the individual needs, how much
they need, and how long they need them i...
Independent Assessment
• Includes an opportunity for the individual to identify other
persons to be consulted such as spou...
Independent Assessment
• Information from the assessment helps the team and the
individual plan services and supports.
• D...
Person-Centered Planning Meeting
• The individual can invite anyone they want. Interpreters or
communication device should...
Plan Process
• The process should offer the individual choices about the
types of services they want, where they want them...
The written plan should include:
• Options presented to the individual about where to live and
what was chosen and why.
• ...
The plan must also:
• Note any risks the individual might encounter and plans to
deal with them.
• Include the name of the...
When an individual’s setting or service must be
modified
• Sometimes, in order for a person with a disability to be
well-s...
Requirements for Modifying HCBS service or
setting
• The PCP must identify the specific and individual assessed
need.
• Th...
Requirements for Modifying HCBS service or
setting
• The plan is reevaluated regularly to review whether the changes
in th...
For More Information:
Patricia Nobbie, Ph.D.
Center for Disability and Aging Policy
Administration for Community Living
Pa...
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NACDD: Deep Dive into HCBS Policy. Pat Nobbie

From NACDD's 2014 Annual Conference
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NACDD: Deep Dive into HCBS Policy. Pat Nobbie

  • 1. HCBS Settings Rule An Opportunity to Advance Integrated Community Living
  • 2. Overview of CMS 2249-F and 2296-F Title: Medicaid Program; State Plan Home and Community-Based Services, 5-Year Period for Waivers, Provider Payment Reassignment, and Home and Community-Based Setting Requirements for Community First Choice (Section 1915(k) of the Act) and Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers (Section 1915(c) of the Act) • Published Federal Register 1/16/2014
  • 3. Highlights • Defines, describes, and aligns home and community-based setting requirements across three Medicaid authorities 1915 (i) (c) (k) • Defines person-centered planning requirements for persons in HCBS settings under 1915(c) HCBS waiver and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan authorities • Implements regulations for 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefit
  • 4. What CMS intends • The home and community-based setting requirements establish an outcome oriented definition that focuses on the nature and quality of individuals’ experiences • The requirements maximize opportunities for individuals to have access to the benefits of community living and the opportunity to receive services in the most integrated setting • Implementation should enhance the quality of HCBS and provide protections to participants
  • 5. The Main ideas • HCB Settings Characteristics – What are NOT home and community-based – What are presumed not to be HCBS – What are the mandatory requirements for HCBS, including Secretarial discretion to determine other qualities • Person-centered service planning now in code • Conflict-free case management now in code • Transition planning to come into compliance with the HCB settings requirements
  • 6. What is NOT HCBS is a short list • Settings that are NOT Home and Community-based: – Nursing facility – Institution for mental diseases (IMD) – Intermediate care facility for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICF/IID) – Hospital
  • 7. Settings PRESUMED not to be HCBS • Settings in a publicly or privately-owned facility providing inpatient treatment • Settings on grounds of, or adjacent to, a public institution • Settings with the effect of isolating individuals from the broader community of individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS These settings may NOT be included in states’ 1915(c), 1915(i) or 1915(k) HCBS programs unless: • A state submits evidence (including public input) demonstrating that the setting does have the qualities of a home and community-based setting and NOT the qualities of an institution; AND • The Secretary finds, based on a heightened scrutiny review of the evidence, that the setting meets the requirements for home and community-based settings and does NOT have the qualities of an institution
  • 8. Qualities of an HCBS Setting The Home and Community-Based setting: • Is integrated in and supports access to the greater community • Provides opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources • Ensures the individual receives services in the community to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid home and community-based services
  • 9. Mandatory qualities • The setting is selected by the individual from among setting options, including non-disability specific settings and an option for a private unit* in a residential setting • Person-centered service plans document the options based on the individual’s needs, preferences; and for residential settings, the individual’s resources • *States must have options available for individuals to potentially choose a private room • Does NOT mean all providers must now offer or provide private rooms • Note above, planning can take into effect the “individual resources”
  • 10. Further qualities • Ensures an individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect, and freedom from coercion and restraint • Optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices • Facilitates individual choice regarding services and supports, and who provides them • These requirements exist for services provided in the individual’s own home as well.
  • 11. Home and Community-Based Setting Requirements for Provider-Owned or Controlled Residential Settings • Specific unit/dwelling is owned, rented, or occupied under legally enforceable agreement • Same responsibilities/protections from eviction as all tenants under landlord tenant law of state, county, city or other designated entity • If tenant laws do not apply, state ensures lease, residency agreement or other written agreement is in place providing protections to address eviction processes and appeals comparable to those provided under the jurisdiction’s landlord tenant law
  • 12. Other requirements in provider owned or controlled • Each individual has privacy in their sleeping or living unit • Units have lockable entrance doors, with appropriate staff having keys to doors as needed • Individuals sharing units have a choice of roommates • Individuals have the freedom to furnish and decorate their sleeping or living units within the lease or other agreement • Individuals have freedom and support to control their schedules and activities and have access to food any time • Individuals may have visitors at any time • Setting is physically accessible to the individual
  • 13. Rules cover Non-Residential services as well • CMS will release guidance for bringing non-residential services and settings into compliance at a later date • This guidance will include day services, day habilitation, adult day care, pre-employment services, sheltered work, and other day and employment services.
  • 14. Transition Planning • For NEW 1915(c) HCBS waivers or 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefits to be approved, states must ensure that HCBS are only delivered in settings that meet the new requirements. [(K) approvals were expected to be compliant upon submission] For renewals and amendments to existing HCBS 1915(c) waivers submitted within one year of the effective date of final rule: • The state submits a plan in the renewal or amendment request detailing necessary actions to achieve or document compliance with setting requirements for the specific waiver or amendment • Renewal or amendment approval will be contingent upon inclusion of an approved transition plan for that waivers services
  • 15. 1915(i) state plan amendments For renewals and amendments to existing 1915(i) state plan benefits submitted within one year of the effective date of final rule: • The state submits a plan in the State Plan Amendment (SPA) or renewal (for 1915(i)s that target) request detailing any actions necessary to achieve or document compliance with setting requirements for the specific waiver or amendment • SPA approval or renewal of the 1915(i) will be contingent upon inclusion of an approved transition plan
  • 16. Statewide Transition Plan For ALL existing 1915(c) HCBS waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefits in the state, the state must submit a plan: • Within 120 days of first renewal or amendment request detailing how the state will comply with the settings requirements in ALL 1915(c) HCBS waivers and 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefits • The level and detail of the plan will be determined by the types and characteristics of settings used in the individual state
  • 17. By March 16, 2015 When a state DOES NOT renew or amend an existing 1915(c) HCBS waiver or 1915(i) HCBS State Plan benefit for HCBS within one year of the effective date of the final rule, the plan to document or achieve compliance with settings requirements must: • Be submitted within one year of the effective date of the final rule (March 17, 2014) • Include all elements, timelines, and deliverables as required
  • 18. Approaching Transition Planning • CMS has not released guidance on developing the Transition Plan. So what are states doing? Where can they start? – Each state’s waiver and state plan service system has structure – service definitions, reimbursement rates, certification and licensure requirements, quality standards, etc. that establish expectations, provide guidance and measure performance in the services. – A good first step would be to review and assess these state standards, policies and practices to determine whether they are aligned with the Federal requirements and then plan to make the necessary modifications.
  • 19. Stakeholder involvement • The process of self-assessment is best conducted with stakeholders including self-advocates, families, advocates and providers. – The rule does not require public or stakeholder engagement in this review process. However, CMS has said stakeholder engagement “early and often” is helpful to the state in preparing a solid transition plan. • This process of involvement can help to build support for needed changes and prepare providers to make necessary changes to their program.
  • 20. Here are some of the components to consider in assessing infrastructure and need for modifications: 1. Service definitions 2. Service standards and requirements Regulations Provider qualifications Training requirements 3. Service contracts, rate methodology, billing and adequacy of rates 4. Person-centered planning requirements and documentation 5. Quality Management Practices Individual plan monitoring requirements – support coordination UR practices Provider monitoring – licensing, certification Performance outcome measurement – using National Core Indicators Provider Reporting requirements 6. Information Systems
  • 21. Public Input is Required • Under 1915(c) rules, waiver amendments and renewals must be posted for 30 day public comment • Under the new HCBS Rule, all statewide transition plans must be posted for public comment for 30 days. • There is no requirement in the rule for states to engage the public in the assessment process, but CMS has said that public engagement “early and often” is encouraged. • Advocates believe it is necessary to engage on the assessment activity.
  • 22. Public Comment Requirements • The state must provide at a minimum 2 statements of public notice and public input procedures • Must ensure the full Transition plan(s) is available to the public for comment • The state must submit with the Transition Plan evidence of the public notice; a summary of comments received during the comment period, reasons why comments were not adopted, and any modifications made to the plan as a result of the comments. • State must retain the public comments in their entirety
  • 23. Person Centered Planning in Official Regulations • Person-centered planning has been incorporated in the delivery of services to older adults and people with disabilities for many years. For the first time, the HCBS settings rule puts the requirements for person-centered planning into regulation – known in the HCBS rule as “person centered service planning.”
  • 24. Coherence with ACA • On June 6, 2014 Secretary Sebelius signed guidance to HHS agencies on standards for person-centered planning and self-direction of HCBS that should be embedded in all HHS funded HCBS programs as appropriate. The guidance is consistent with the final rule from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Medicaid HCBS, and meets the requirement in section 2402(a) of the Affordable Care Act for a more consistent administration of policies and procedures across programs. This guidance is the Department’s first step in implementing section 2402(a).
  • 25. ACA 2402(a) • Section 2402(a) of the Affordable Care Act requires the Secretary to ensure all states receiving federal funds develop service systems that are responsive to the needs and choices of beneficiaries receiving home and community-based long-term services (HCBS), maximize independence and self-direction, provide support coordination to assist with a community-supported life, and achieve a more consistent and coordinated approach to the administration of policies and procedures across public programs providing HCBS.
  • 26. 2402(a) • Outlines the standards for person-centered planning (PCP) and self-direction (SD) that should be reflected in all HHS programs that fund or provide HCBS. • The standards in this guidance should be used in future program regulations, program policies, funding opportunities, technical assistance contracts, grant opportunities, and other programs funding HCBS.
  • 27. 2402(a) • The guidance for the steps in the PCP process, as well as the steps that must be taken when a person’s services are modified in any way mirror the steps in the HCBS settings rule. • The settings rule and the 2402(a) guidance can go a long way toward establishing coherence and consistency in person-centered planning and self-direction for all individuals benefitting from HHS services.
  • 28. HCBS Settings Rule: STEPS • The person-centered plan process has 5 steps: • Independent evaluation and determination of eligibility (for state plan services (i) • An independent assessment (for state plan services) • The person-centered service planning meeting • Writing the person-centered service plan • Reviewing the plan
  • 29. Independent Evaluation / Eligibility • Evaluation of the individual’s eligibility for the state plan benefit is performed by an agent that is qualified and independent. • Applies the needs-based criteria the state has established under 441.715(a) (individual’s need for support) • Includes consultation with the individual and / or the individual’s representative • Uses current and accurate information from existing records • Must be re-determined at least every 12 months
  • 30. Independent Assessment • The supports and services the individual needs, how much they need, and how long they need them is discovered during an independent assessment. • May include a standardized functional needs assessment. • The agent doing the assessment must be qualified and independent of the service provider • The assessment must be face to face, or through the use of health technology provided certain conditions are met.
  • 31. Independent Assessment • Includes an opportunity for the individual to identify other persons to be consulted such as spouse, guardian, family, and other treating professionals • Examines the individual’s relevant history • Includes assessment of mental and physical health, needs for support in areas of cooking, shopping or banking, where the individual wants to live, their goals, who they would like to provide services, etc • If unpaid caregivers will be relied upon to implement any elements of the plan, a caregiver assessment.
  • 32. Independent Assessment • Information from the assessment helps the team and the individual plan services and supports. • During the planning process the team should find creative ways to help the individual meet their goals whether or not there are specific services and supports available. • The individual must be given the option to self-direct their services, including getting training or education on how to self-direct.
  • 33. Person-Centered Planning Meeting • The individual can invite anyone they want. Interpreters or communication device should be provided if needed. • Meeting must be held in a manner that respects the individual’s culture and is conducted in a language the individual understands. • It should be clear how conflicts or differences among team members will be resolved.
  • 34. Plan Process • The process should offer the individual choices about the types of services they want, where they want them delivered, information on residential options, where they spend their day, and why those choices were made. • Include who will provide services, including day service and living options that are not only with other people with disabilities. • The plan can be changed or updated at the individual’s request, but must be renewed at least annually.
  • 35. The written plan should include: • Options presented to the individual about where to live and what was chosen and why. • Where the individual chose to receive other services, like supported employment. • The individual’s strengths, preferences and needs. • The supports needed, both paid and unpaid. • Things the individual wants to accomplish (goals) and how they will know they have achieved them (outcomes).
  • 36. The plan must also: • Note any risks the individual might encounter and plans to deal with them. • Include the name of the person responsible for making sure the plan is followed. • Be written in plain language that the individual understands. • Include the signatures of everyone who participated, and everyone should get a copy. A plan can be modified at any time, at the individual’s request, or if their circumstances change.
  • 37. When an individual’s setting or service must be modified • Sometimes, in order for a person with a disability to be well-supported and safe in the community, there must be some modifications made. For example, some people cannot have unlimited access to food because of the risk to their health. If an individual needs special supports or modifications where they live or receive services, those need to be written into their person-centered plan under a special set of rules.
  • 38. Requirements for Modifying HCBS service or setting • The PCP must identify the specific and individual assessed need. • The PCP must document the interventions and supports that were tried prior to modifying the plan. • The PCP must describe less intrusive methods of meeting the need that were tried but did not work. • The plan must include a clear description of the condition that is directly proportionate to the specific assessed need.
  • 39. Requirements for Modifying HCBS service or setting • The plan is reevaluated regularly to review whether the changes in the individual’s plan are working to help them meet their goals (data collection and review of data). • The plan must include time limits on the restrictions on the individual’s freedoms. The changes should only stay in their plan for as long as they are needed. • The plan must explain to the individual in language they can understand what the changes are, why the changes are being made and the individual’s informed consent must be included in the plan. • The plan must include assurances that the changes will not harm the individual.
  • 40. For More Information: Patricia Nobbie, Ph.D. Center for Disability and Aging Policy Administration for Community Living Patricia.nobbie@acl.hhs.gov http://HCBSadvocacy.org AUCD Informational Website www.cms.gov http://www.medicaid.gov/HCBS All materials generated by CMS. Where to watch for future guidance. hcbs@cms.hhs.gov: mailbox for additional questions to CMS

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