National Association of Councils on
Developmental Disabilities
Annual Conference, 2014
A DAY IN OUR SHOES:
Adults with Dev...
Project Goals
To hear directly from adults with
developmental disabilities
To better understand daily life
among adults ...
Statewide focus groups
Flagstaff, Prescott Valley, Sierra
Vista, Yuma
35 participants
Average age: 39 years old
66% wh...
Transportation and Access:
Getting AroundTown
Transportation and Access (cont.)
Structural barriers persist
At restaurants, their bathrooms are too small. You can’t ev...
Source of Transportation
Reported by Percent of
Arizonans with DD, 2012
Leisure Time and Social
Networks:
“A Day in My Life”
“A Day in My Life”
“A Day in My Life”
Social Networks
Support networks varied by where the individual
lived (i.e. group home, with family, apartment)
Friends ...
Choice of Living
Arrangement:
The Desire for Independence
Arizonans Living at Home in
Great Numbers
Desire for Independence
Satisfied with living with family or their group
home, but would prefer having additional options...
Unemployed and Not Looking:
Barriers and Challenges
to Finding Employment
Employment Outcomes
Deteriorating
Arizona Employment Outcomes
(2011)
People with disabilities are more likely to be living in poverty,
making $9,652 less a...
Why They Are Not in the Labor Force
Employers’ bias about their disabilities
I had the manager tell me that I couldn’t wo...
Why They Are Not in the Labor Force
(cont.)
Negative past work experiences
Although some had career ambitions, most
woul...
Facing Family Fears:
Balancing Safety
and Independence
Facing Family Fears:
Balancing Safety with
Independence
My biggest problem as a parent is what is going to
happen to him w...
Need for Information
and Advocacy:
FindingTheirVoices
Need for Information and
Advocacy
Feel a loss of control
You don’t want to have to depend on people, you want to be
able ...
Discussion and Next Steps:
SomeThings to Consider
The Poverty Cycle
“Gardner and Mathis Disability
Bubble”
Mentors
Community Jobs
Diverse friends
Community interests
Neighbors
Civic/religiou...
Breaking the Bubble: Continuum
of Community Participation
Physical Having Active
presence presence participation
 
Limitations
The focus group participants
don’t necessarily represent the
overall state DD population
Reports their perce...
Next Steps
Independence over Dependence: How can individuals
be offered more opportunities outside of the disability
bubb...
MorrisonInstitute.asu.edu
www.azdes.gov/ADDPC/Home/
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NACDD: Empowering Community Inclusion Through Natural Supports. Arizona

From NACDD's 2014 Annual Conference
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NACDD: Empowering Community Inclusion Through Natural Supports. Arizona

  • 1. National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities Annual Conference, 2014 A DAY IN OUR SHOES: Adults with Developmental Disabilities Share Their Experiences Living in Small Cities and Towns
  • 2. Project Goals To hear directly from adults with developmental disabilities To better understand daily life among adults with developmental disabilities To assess unique the problems among adults with developmental disabilities outside an urban setting
  • 3. Statewide focus groups Flagstaff, Prescott Valley, Sierra Vista, Yuma 35 participants Average age: 39 years old 66% white, non-Hispanic 80% at least a high school diploma 40% unemployed, 29% center or group based employment, 2% competitively employed “A Day in My Life”
  • 4. Transportation and Access: Getting AroundTown
  • 5. Transportation and Access (cont.) Structural barriers persist At restaurants, their bathrooms are too small. You can’t even get in there. It’s an old town, but there is always a step. Loss of control/choice when relying on others When deciding on where to go, for us in the group home, it really depends on what one person wants to do. Four people don’t want to go to the same place. Inaccessible transportation Location means everything
  • 6. Source of Transportation Reported by Percent of Arizonans with DD, 2012
  • 7. Leisure Time and Social Networks: “A Day in My Life”
  • 8. “A Day in My Life”
  • 9. “A Day in My Life”
  • 10. Social Networks Support networks varied by where the individual lived (i.e. group home, with family, apartment) Friends like me Many of their high school friends relocate Social lives interconnected with professional staff When we go out to dinner go out in public, we go with staff out and eat and see friends. We will go out once on the weekends. We do a lot of stuff in the house a lot more. I hang out a lot more with my staff than anything else.
  • 11. Choice of Living Arrangement: The Desire for Independence
  • 12. Arizonans Living at Home in Great Numbers
  • 13. Desire for Independence Satisfied with living with family or their group home, but would prefer having additional options It is not like having freedom. We want to be able to spend time with our friends, invite people over, get away from our parents - spend time with your friends more. The reason I want to live on my own is so I can be happy, feed myself, pay the bills myself, try on and get clothes by myself, and get a pet. Shortage of affordable, accessible housing
  • 14. Unemployed and Not Looking: Barriers and Challenges to Finding Employment
  • 15. Employment Outcomes Deteriorating
  • 16. Arizona Employment Outcomes (2011) People with disabilities are more likely to be living in poverty, making $9,652 less annually than people without disabilities. People with disabilities are approximately three times LESS likely to be employed than people without disabilities. Three-quarters of people with disabilities are unemployed and not looking for work.
  • 17. Why They Are Not in the Labor Force Employers’ bias about their disabilities I had the manager tell me that I couldn’t work there because I was retarded. I work harder and do more than other people, but I never get the opportunity. Felt the job market had changed to their detriment At jobs that I would normally get, like fast food, people who are overqualified are applying. Fear of losing SSI benefits When you work too many hours a year, you lose your benefits. When you lose your benefits, you have to start the whole process over again if you ever need it again. Didn’t think they could work or were happy not working
  • 18. Why They Are Not in the Labor Force (cont.) Negative past work experiences Although some had career ambitions, most would take any job. This is what one individual said about working at her center-based job. It is not our favorite, but it is what we have right now. At least we have a job where we can earn money. Some preferred center-based employment or day treatment. If I work out in the community I would just be picked on and made fun of. I would rather work with others like myself where I won’t get teased.
  • 19. Facing Family Fears: Balancing Safety and Independence
  • 20. Facing Family Fears: Balancing Safety with Independence My biggest problem as a parent is what is going to happen to him when I am gone. My husband passed away two years ago …. I always took him everywhere. We exposed him to everything. He can read and write… It was his idea to move to an apartment. We were against it, but it has worked out very well. He keeps his apartment very clean. He does all my chores. Comes over to my house every day. He shops by himself.
  • 21. Need for Information and Advocacy: FindingTheirVoices
  • 22. Need for Information and Advocacy Feel a loss of control You don’t want to have to depend on people, you want to be able to be independent… to do these things for yourself. We do have a voice, but we keep getting ignored. Unanimously desired a local self-advocacy group Where can we go to get better information to help us along. How to get Social Security, how to get benefits… a support system. That would be really great for us. We don’t need to be alone. You can’t change people, but you can change perception.
  • 23. Discussion and Next Steps: SomeThings to Consider
  • 24. The Poverty Cycle
  • 25. “Gardner and Mathis Disability Bubble” Mentors Community Jobs Diverse friends Community interests Neighbors Civic/religious/ volunteer association Friends of friends Significant other Families’ co-workers Access to information Access to resources Sports Entertainment Choice Control Independence Flexibility Creativity
  • 26. Breaking the Bubble: Continuum of Community Participation Physical Having Active presence presence participation
  • 27. Limitations The focus group participants don’t necessarily represent the overall state DD population Reports their perceptions, which may differ from the points of view of counselors or family members Focus group time/location may affect who attended Recruitment may not include those who are “disconnected”
  • 28. Next Steps Independence over Dependence: How can individuals be offered more opportunities outside of the disability bubble, learn independence and learn from failure, while still remaining safe? Building a System Outside of the System: How can informal systems be expanded to provide mentoring networks, ride sharing, information exchanges, and support? Community Participation: How can individual interests and dreams be supported by a formal system with a shortage of resources and transportation?
  • 29. MorrisonInstitute.asu.edu www.azdes.gov/ADDPC/Home/

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