TOOLKIT PRESENTED BY
NATIONAL RUNAWAY SAFELINE
NATIONAL
RUNAWAY
PREVENTION
MONTH 2015
2015 NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MON...
ABOUT NRPM
NRPM is spearheaded each year by the National
Runaway Safeline (NRS) and NationalNetwork for
Youth (NN4Y). The ...
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PARTICIPATE IN ONE OF THE NATIONWIDE
NRPM EVENTS: Check out our list of national
events to ...
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GREEN LIGHT PROJECT: The Green Light
Project is a long-time part of National Runaway
Prevention Month, a...
Green Light Project
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››PG 4 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
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* Tell NRS about your Project - We want to hear about your Gre...
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH: #TBT. Post a
picture of you as a teenager on Facebook,
Twitter, or Instagram for ‘thro...
Want to support NRPM by organizing a
fundraiser? Not sure how to get started?
Check out our tips and ideas.
SUGGESTED FUND...
TALKING POINTS SOCIAL MEDIA
MEDIA AND ART
GOVERNMENT
Want to get the word out about NRPM
and runaway and homeless youth bu...
››PG 8 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
SAMPLE PROCLAMATION REQUEST
DATE
The Honorable FIRST NAME LAST NAME,
TITLE OF OFFICEHOLDER,
ADDRE...
››PG 9 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
SAMPLE PROCLAMATION
November is National Runaway Prevention Month: A Proclamation
The future well...
Press releases and media pitches are a great way to get the word out about NRPM in
general as well as any local events or ...
community members throughout the country 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Over 10,000
youth have been reunited with their ...
››PG 12 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
12 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT.
Below is a sample of a media pitch to a youth magazine, encouraging edi...
››PG 13 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
13 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT.
This is a sample media alert for a candlelight vigil during November.
*...
ABOUT NRS: The National Runaway Safeline, formerly known as the National Runaway
Switchboard, established in 1971, serves ...
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NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH Toolkit 2015 - National Runaway Safeline

Information on easy ways to get involved, event planning, fundraising, and getting the word out on runaway and homeless youth prevention from the National Runaway Safeline.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH Toolkit 2015 - National Runaway Safeline

  • 1. TOOLKIT PRESENTED BY NATIONAL RUNAWAY SAFELINE NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH 2015 2015 NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH THAN MEETS THE EYE STUD NT FRI ND SIBLING MORE E E E E E E E E ® NRPM2015 ®
  • 2. ABOUT NRPM NRPM is spearheaded each year by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) and NationalNetwork for Youth (NN4Y). The goals of NRPM are two-fold: 1. To raise awareness of the runaway and homeless youth crisis andthe issues that these young people face. 2. To educate the public aboutsolutions and the role they can play in ending youth homelessness NRPM began in October 2002, President Bush hosted the landmark White House Conference on Exploited and Runaway Children, where leaders from across the country convened to discuss issues and challenges related to the runaway and homeless youth crisis. What once was known as National Runaway Prevention Week was thus expanded into a month long prevention and awareness campaign. Over the years, members of Congress have taken steps to commemorate National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM); supporting and recognizing its goals and ideals by introducing both House and Senate Resolutions. Proud sponsors of NRPM resolutions have included Rep. Judy Biggert (R-IL), Rep. Ruben Hinojosa (D-TX), Rep. Jon Porter (R-NV), Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY), Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), Sen. Susan Collins (R- ME), Sen. Orrin Hatch (R- UT), Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-AK). The theme of NRPM 2015 is “More Than Meets the Eye.” This theme is designed to dispel stereotypes about runaway and homeless youth by showing the complexity of every young person. ABOUT THIS GUIDE Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away in a year. If all of these young people lived in one city, it would be the fifth largest city in the United States. These numbers are unacceptable, particularly when you consider the fact that many of these young people will end up on the streets. These are not bad kids; they are good kids in bad situations. By supporting NRPM, you are showing America’s runaway and homeless youth that they are not invisible and they are not alone. This toolkit, designed and distributed by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS), is intended to serve as a resource for organizations, agencies, businesses, schools, individuals, etc. who wish to participate in National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM). Community participation is the key to NRPM’s success. Community involvement during NRPM is central to the campaign’s success. For each community, organization, school, person, etc. involved in NRPM, we become that much closer to ending youth homelessness. This guide is broken into four sections: 10 easy ways to make a difference during NRPM, events and activities, fundraising, and getting the word out. INTRODUCTION 01 ››PG 1 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT
  • 3. 7. 8. 9. 10. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. PARTICIPATE IN ONE OF THE NATIONWIDE NRPM EVENTS: Check out our list of national events to participate in. Hosting a candlelight vigil, participating in a social media campaign, or organizing a ‘wear green’ day will be instrumental in calling attention to the runaway and homeless youth crisis. PARTICIPATE IN A LOCAL EVENT: Contact a local youth services agency to see what they have planned for NRPM. HOST A BOOK CLUB OR MOVIE NIGHT: Through collaboration with the NRPM task force and NRS’ Youth Activist League, we have compiled a list of media relevant to NRPM. Click here for suggestions for movies, books, songs, and other pieces of media salient to NRPM. BECOME A STREET TEAM MEMBER: Join NRS’ Street Team and help pass out wallet cards, pens and brochures in your area; in return, earn cool rewards for your outreach efforts. Register for the Street Team today. HOST A FUNDRAISER: Organize a fundraiser at your office, place of worship, school, or social club. A list of fundraising ideas can be found here. DECLARE NOVEMBER AS NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH: Have a proclamation or resolution signed for National Runaway Prevention Month in your state or city. A proclamation is granted by an elected official such as a mayor, governor, or president. Get a sample proclamation on pages 21-22 of this toolkit. DEVELOP A “RUNAWAY” DISPLAY: Get permission from your local library, public building, bank, etc. to display free promotional materials in their lobby. Materials could include brochures about NRS and the runaway issue, bookmarks, pencils, and wallet cards. Order free materials online to distribute in your display. CREATE AN E-CAMPAIGN: Tell your online contacts about NRPM by adding the following message to your e-mail signature or social media network: “November is National Runaway Prevention Month! Get involved today by visiting 1800RUNAWAY.org.” WRITE AN OP-ED: Submit an op-ed to your local newspaper, highlighting the importance of NRPM. For tips on writing an op-ed, click here: link is http://newsoffice.duke.edu/duke_resources/oped ADOPT NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH: Ask your local school student council, sports team, or other extra- curricular group to “adopt” National Runaway Prevention Month this year and distribute posters, wallet cards, and other materials in your school, mall, or community center. Planning a successful campaign doesn’t have to involve a huge campaign budget or a major national organization. Here are 10 easy activities to raise awareness in your community: ››PG 2 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 0210 EASY WAYS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE DURING NRPM
  • 4. 4. 5. 6. 1. 2. 3. GREEN LIGHT PROJECT: The Green Light Project is a long-time part of National Runaway Prevention Month, and getting involved is as easy as flipping a switch, wearing a lapel pin, securing a landmark or building to be lit green in November, and/or participating in ‘Wear Green’Day. COMMUNITY PRESENTATION: Deliver a presentation to a community group (schools, civic groups, faith based organizations, etc.) on the problem of youth runaways and the resources available. Contact NRS at outreach@1800RUNAWAY.org or 773-880-9860 ext. 718 to order free 1-800-RUNAWAY promotional materials to hand out at presentations. GET LOCAL, STATE AND NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES INVOLVED: Have a proclamation or resolution signed for National Runaway Prevention Month. A proclamation is granted by an elected official such as a mayor, governor, or president. A resolution is signed by a legislative body such as a state legislature, county commission, or city council. The National Runaway Safeline and the National Network for Youth work to engage Congressional representatives in runaway prevention. In previous years, Congressional representatives have passed resolutions in support of runaway prevention. ››PG 3 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 03EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES DEVELOP A “RUNAWAY DISPLAY”: Develop a display of statistics and promotional materials that viewers can “take-away” (i.e. pen- cils, bookmarks, brochures) and get permission to set up your information in a busy public area. You might try a public building, a busy business in town, or a state / county fair. Contact the National Runaway Safeline at 1-800-RUNAWAY to order free promotional materials to distribute at your runaway display. INVITE THE PUBLIC TO HEAR LOCAL EXPERTS: Host a general forum for youth, parents, service providers and other stakeholders in runaway prevention. Invite expert guest speakers to present information at the forum – your experts could be representatives from service providers, city agencies, and/or youth. This approach has been successfully implemented by the New York City Department of Youth and Community Development both as a multi-location short event and as a one- location, all-day event. INVOLVE YOUR LOCAL POLITICIANS: Invite a local politician (mayor, city councilperson, congressman, etc.) to attend your event. Having a respected local dignitary in attendance can increase the credibility of your event, and bring you additional press coverage. SUGGESTED EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES
  • 5. Green Light Project 04 ››PG 4 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 1. 2. 3. 4. * Tell NRS about your Project - We want to hear about your Green Light Project! Email Community Engagement Specialist to share your green light goals, successes, set-backs, and results. Plan a green light event/ceremony and purchase and distribute green light bulbs in your community. Green light bulbs are available at most local hardware stores. Participate in a Green Light Project event by securing a landmark or building in their community to be lit green in November. Create green awareness ribbons and distribute them to local government officials and/or local businesses. Join groups across the country to wear green on Thursday, November 20th or choose your own day to wear as an office, school, sports team, social club, Greek organization, service organization, etc. Take a group picture* and send it to NRS to be featured on Facebook and website. The Green Light Project is the symbol for National Runaway Prevention Month, and getting involved is as easy as flipping a switch, wearing a lapel pin, securing a landmark or building to be lit green in November, and/or participating in ‘Wear Green’ Day.
  • 6. 3. 4. 1. 2. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH: #TBT. Post a picture of you as a teenager on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram for ‘throwback Thursday.’ Use the caption “I remember what it’s like’ and the hashtag #NRPM2015. If space allows, include a link for your followers to find out more at 1800RUNAWAY.org/national-run- away-prevention-month. Consider making the photo your profile picture for the month of November to draw even more attention to NRPM. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH: WEAR GREEN’ DAY: Most people have something green in their closet; whether it be a t-shirt, tie, pair of socks, etc. Coordinate a ‘wear green’ day with your friends, coworkers, students, and/or classmates on November 12th. This is a fun and easy way to get people to learn more about NRPM. For added impact, take a photo of your group wearing green and post it to social media with the hashtag #NRPM2015. Tag NRS and we could share your photo! THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH: ‘NATIONAL CANDLELIGHT VIGIL. Youth service agencies, community groups, and individuals will be hosting candlelight vigils to show solidarity with youth in crisis. Host your own candlelight vigil in your neighborhood, at your school, your workplace, your place of worship, etc. This event is low cost and high impact. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH: ‘GIVE THANKS’ THUNDERCLAP. On Thanksgiving, while people reflect on what they are thankful for, NRS is asking that everyone across the country to ‘pay it forward’ by participating in our online thunderclap. If you have never heard of a thunderclap, you can think of it like the online version of those ‘funds raised’ thermometers. Except, instead of measuring money, thunderclaps measure impressions. Learn more about thunderclaps at thunderclap.it. Check out our list (below) to see the calendar and descriptions for NRPM’s national events. Weekly events (two online events, two “in real life” events) will take place on each Thursday in November. For more detailed descriptions of our national events, including what is needed for a candlelight vigil, click here. ››PG 5 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 05NRPM NATIONAL EVENTS
  • 7. Want to support NRPM by organizing a fundraiser? Not sure how to get started? Check out our tips and ideas. SUGGESTED FUNDRAISERS TIPS ON ORGANIZING A FUNDRAISER 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE: Do your friends love to be outdoors, or do they prefer a night at the pub? Think of an activity that your friends/ family/ coworkers already enjoy and use it as a way to raise funds. For example, someone whose friends love throwing dinner parties could host an NRPM dinner party, with a suggested donation and green decorations. MAKE IT TANGIBLE: Asking people to do something specific is more motivating than just asking for “donations.” For example, asking your coworkers to all pack lunch on a certain day and give what they would have spent as a donation is more tangible and relatable than just asking them to donate. DON’T UNDERESTIMATE SOCIAL MEDIA: While in-person events are a lot of fun, online ‘events’ may be more convenient for some people to participate in. For example, you could take to your social media pages with a challenge to your friends to collectively donate $100 for you to post embarrassing photos from middle school. TIE THE EVENT TO THE ISSUE: Organizing a fun event or challenge will draw people in, but relating it back to the cause will provide extra motivation for people to participate. In your invitations, you can cite statistics about runaway and homeless youth or include quotes from one of the books or movies in our media guide. Reminding people where their money will go is important. SHOW GRATITUDE: Thank everyone who participates, at least once. Handwritten thank you notes are a way to go the extra mile. ››PG 6 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 06NRPM FUNDRAISING GUIDE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 GET SPONSORED TO RUN/ WALK/BIKE: Ask people to pledge a predetermined amount for each mile you run/ walk/bike then run/walk/bike as long as you can. HOLD A YARD SALE: Need to get rid of stuff around the house? Hold a yard sale in November with all or a portion of the proceeds going toward runaway and homeless youth programs. Distribute NRPM materials during the yard sale as an extra way to spread the word. ACCEPT A CHALLENGE: Need a push to do something? Set a challenge for yourself, such as skydiving, cutting your hair, wearing an embarrassing outfit in public, or doing an open mic night, and then challenge your contacts to meet a fundraising goal (the amount can vary). Once the fundraising goal has been met, do said activity. FORGO GIFTS: Have a birthday, anniversary, or other special event coming up? Consider asking for donations to runaway and homeless youth programs in lieu of gifts. HOST A SLEEP OUT: Invite people to participate in a sleep out to raise money for runaway and homeless youth. Ask people to get sponsored or ask for a donation to participate. HOST A PARTY: Organize and host a party. Ask people for a suggested donation. Throughout the evening, you can read excerpts or show clips from the books and movies from our media guide. BRING IT TO WORK: Create a challenge or activity specific to your workplace. Work in an office? Set a fundraising goal and if the goal is met, jeans will be allowed on a certain day. Do your coworkers go out to lunch every day? Ask them to bring their lunch for a day and donate what they would have spent. CREATE A CONTEST: Team up with a friend, family member, or coworker. Set up a contest between the two of you; i.e. whoever raises more money will have the other one do their laundry, paperwork, or cleaning for a week/ month/etc. Then, set a fundraising period (week, month, day, etc.) and let the games begin! LOOSE CHANGE: Choose a day to ask everyone at your workplace, school, or place of worship to donate their loose change to runaway and homeless youth programs. Make sure to let people know how much money they raised! GIVE UP YOUR FAVORITE THING: Have a fancy coffee every morning? Love chocolate? Give it up for a week or month. You can then either donate the amount saved and ask people to match the amount, or, if your favorite thing doesn’t cost anything (for example, watching your favorite show) have people sponsor you.
  • 8. TALKING POINTS SOCIAL MEDIA MEDIA AND ART GOVERNMENT Want to get the word out about NRPM and runaway and homeless youth but not sure where to start? We have compiled some easily referenced talking points. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. The theme of NRPM 2015, that these ‘different’ groups of underserved youth (LGBTQ, foster youth, homeless youth, abused youth) actually overlap and intersect quite a bit. We, as a country, need to think about how we canbetter serve youth in general, rather than putting youth into ‘boxes. RHY youth are not ‘bad kids,’ they are typically good kids caught in bad situations. Runaway and homeless youth are not limited to urban environments. There are runaway and homeless youth in every community: urban, suburban, and rural. Runaway and homeless youth often do not look like the stereotype of an adult homeless person. They often try to hide their situation and therefore the issue remains invisible. Young people on the street are often perceived as ‘bad kids’ if/ when they engage in risky be- haviors. The reality is that many of these young people do not engage in these behaviors until they are already on the streets, and only do so for survival or to cope. This is a solvable problem. Rather than taking it into their own hands, the public can help runaway and homeless youth by connecting them with services that are evidence-based. There is a positive social return on investment for those willing to invest in ending youth homelessness. Catching a young person before they turn to a lifetime on the streets saves society money in social programs and medical expenses ››PG 7 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 07 GETTING THE WORD OUT Being a part of NRPM can be as easy as a click, a ‘like,’ a ‘share’ or a retweet. NRS’ social media pages are a great resource to stay informed about youth issues. Throughout November, we will be disseminating data, stories, and other useful information about the runaway and homeless youth crisis. We will also be coordinating two social media ‘events,’ (see our list of NRPM national events for more information) on Thursday, November 6th and Thursday, November 27th. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to stay in the loop! While data is crucial to understanding different issue areas, peoples’ stories are what move us. To get people to understand the issues faced by youth in crisis on an emotional level, we have put together a list of books, movies, TV shows, and other pieces of media that effectively convey the stories of these young people. Want to get your friends and family involved in NRPM? Why not host a book club or movie night with one of the books or movies from our list? You can download the list at 1800runaway.org/runaway-preven- tion-month. Have a proclamation or resolution signed for NRPM. A proclamation is granted by an elected official such as a mayor, governor, or president. A resolu- tion is signed by a legislative body such as a state legislature, county commission, or city council. NRS and the NN4Y work to engage Congressional representatives in runaway prevention. In previous years, Congressional representatives have passed resolutions in support of runaway prevention. Below, we have provided a sample proclamation request as well as a sample proclamation. The portions that require customization have been highlighted in red.
  • 9. ››PG 8 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT SAMPLE PROCLAMATION REQUEST DATE The Honorable FIRST NAME LAST NAME, TITLE OF OFFICEHOLDER, ADDRESS Dear SALUTATION: November is National Runaway Prevention Month. I am writing on behalf of [name of organization] to request you,in your capacity as TITLE OF OFFICE HOLDER to issue an official Proclamation designating November as Runaway Prevention Month in NAME OF STATE OR LOCALITY. The goals of National Runaway Prevention Month are twofold: 1. To raise awareness of the runaway and homeless youth crisis and the issues that these young people face 2. To educate the public about solutions and the role they can play in ending youth homelessness We are partnering with the National Runaway Safeline, the federally-designated communication system for runaway and homeless youth and their families, and the National Network for Youth, an organization representing more than 800 local and community-based youth serving agencies to achieve our combined runaway prevention goals. By issuing an official Proclamation designating November as National Runaway Prevention Month in NAME OF STATE OR LOCALITY you can bring much needed attention to the risks that youth are facing today and would encourage all residents of our STATE OR LOCALITY to play a role in supporting young people who have runaway or who at-risk of doing so. For your convenience, I have attached suggested Proclamation text. NAME OF ORGANIZATION would be pleased to work with you to develop or participate in a Proclamation Signing ceremony and for generating public awareness about the strategies available to ensure the safety and well-being of our STATE/COMMUNITY’s youth and families. Thank you for the opportunity to submit this request. Please let me know of your decision. If you have questions or need additional information, please contact me at PHONE NUMBER AND EMAIL ADDRESS. Sincerely, YOUR NAME, TITLE, ORGANIZATION NAME, CONTACT INFORMATION
  • 10. ››PG 9 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT SAMPLE PROCLAMATION November is National Runaway Prevention Month: A Proclamation The future well-being of our nation is dependent on the value we place on our young people. We must provide opportunities for youth to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop into healthy and productive adults. We must also enlist their families and other adults in the community to serve as mentors and role models for young people, guiding them toward wise choices and available resources and supports. The young people with the least access to these essential opportunities and supports are those in runaway and homeless situations. Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away in a one year period. INSERT STATE OR COMMUNITY DATA IF KNOWN. These young people come from every life circumstance. What they share in common is that their home environments are unsafe and unhealthy. If all of us work together, we can prevent the situations that compel youth to run away from home. Prevention means assisting youth in discovering the delicate balance of life-saving skills: Awareness—what it means to run away and why running away will not solve their problems; Resources—how to build a safety net of trusted people and organizations to turn to for help; Communication—how to speak and listen effectively; and, Stress Management— how to reduce or manage stressors and solve problems. The first step in preventing youth from making the decision to run is our gaining an understanding of the facts about runaway youth in order to dispel the myths about them. Then, we must empower families and communities to aid our nation’s youth in protecting themselves and assuring them all of the opportuni¬ties and supports necessary for their success. Finally, we must challenge adults to act as mentors and role models for youth, guiding them toward available resources and safe, healthy, and productive choices. My administration supports the efforts of the community-based, faith-based, and public organizations in our STATE/COMMUNITY who are working diligently to increase public awareness about, advocate on behalf of, and provide positive and safe alternatives to runaway and homeless youth and their families. NOW, THEREFORE, I, NAME AND TITLE, by virtue of the authority vested in me, do hereby proclaim November as National Runaway Prevention Month in STATE/COMMUNITY I call upon the people of STATE/COMMUNITY to observe this month by supporting young people who have run away or who are at high risk of doing so by developing a personal relationship with them, teaching them skills that promote positive life choices, providing a safety net of trusted friends, adults, and resources to them, and being available to them as they transition to adulthood. IN WITNESS THEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this XXX day of XXX, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen.
  • 11. Press releases and media pitches are a great way to get the word out about NRPM in general as well as any local events or fundraisers that may be going on. We have provided a few templates for other organizations and community members to utilize. In the following pages, you can find a sample press release, a sample media pitch, and a sample media alert. We have highlighted the parts to be customized in red. ››PG 10 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: NAME PHONE EMAIL NAME OF ACTIVITY SPONSOR Commemorates National Runaway Prevention Month by ACTIVITY NOVEMBER IS NATIONAL RUNAWAY PREVENTION MONTH Annual Initiative Raises Awareness, Prevents Youth From Running Away It’s a parent’s worst nightmare—their child has run away. A series of questions and incomprehensible outcomes run through their head. They wonder what to do, where their child was last seen, and what was discussed before they left home that day. Kids run away from home. Even more contemplate running. And more than half of the youth calls handled by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) deal with a youth who is already on the street as a runaway, throw¬away, or homeless youth. November is National Runaway Prevention Month and NRS and the National Network for Youth (NNY) are embarking on the annual national public education campaign to raise awareness of youth runaway issues, and to educate Americans about solutions that help prevent youth from running away. INSERT A QUOTE FROM YOUR ORGANIZATION’S LEADERSHIP AND INFORMATION ABOUT WHAT YOUR ORGANIZATION IS DOING FOR NRPM ABOUT NRS: The National Runaway Safeline, established in 1971, serves as the federally-designated national communication system for homeless and runaway youth. Recognized as the oldest hotline of its kind in the world, NRS, with the support of more than 150 volun- teers, handles an average of 100,000 calls annually. NRS provides crisis intervention, referrals to local resources, and education and prevention services to youth, families and 10 MEDIA AND PRESS SAMPLE PRESS RELEASE
  • 12. community members throughout the country 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Over 10,000 youth have been reunited with their families through the NRS Home Free program done in collaboration with Greyhound Lines, Inc. The NRS crisis hotline is 1-800-RUNAWAY. For information, visit 1800RUNAWAY.org. ABOUT NN4YOUTH: The National Network for Youth, founded in 1975, is a membership organization comprised of youth-serving agencies, young people, youth workers, and youth advocates who seek to ensure that all young people can be safe and lead healthy and productive lives. The National Network focuses its work with and for youth, especially those who, because of life circumstance, disadvantage, past abuse, or prejudice, need greater opportunities and supports to become contributing members of their communities. For more information visit www.nn4youth.org. ››PG 11 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 11 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT.
  • 13. ››PG 12 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 12 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT. Below is a sample of a media pitch to a youth magazine, encouraging editors to write a story about NRPM during November. Hi NAME, Some of your readers may be part of a silent crisis. Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away in a year—but prevention is possible and help is available for the youth that may be considering it. For your November issue, which is National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM), I hope you will consider writing something about the runaway issue that educates your readers about solutions and the role they can play to help prevent their friends from running away. NRPM is symbolized by the color green, and is spearheaded by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS). Your readers can get involved in November by swapping out their porch light for a green one or simply letting their friends know that prevention is possible and help is available through organizations like NRS that offers the 1-800-RUNAWAY hotline and online services via 1800RUNAWAY.org. Below is a little more background on NAME OF ORGANIZATION. If you’re interested, I can share additional runaway statistics and prevention tips, as well as coordinate an interview for you with NAME. Just let me know how I can help with any coverage you’re considering. Warm Regards, YOUR NAME *INCLUDE A PARAGRAPH GIVING BACKGROUND ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION* SAMPLE MEDIA PITCH
  • 14. ››PG 13 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 13 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT. This is a sample media alert for a candlelight vigil during November. **MEDIA ALERT *** MEDIA ALERT *** MEDIA ALERT** ORGANIZATION NAME’S Candlelight Vigil at LOCATION Raises Awareness of Youth Runaway and Homelessness Issues and Solutions for Prevention WHAT: Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away in a year. During National Runaway Prevention Month (NRPM), ORGANIZATION NAME joins the National Runaway Safeline (NRS) and other social service agencies around the nation on Nov. 12 to host a candlelight vigil to show solidarity with these youth in crisis and reflect on the issues faced by runaway and homeless youth. WHO: LIST SPEAKERS AND PRESENTERS WHERE: LIST LOCATION WHEN: Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 from TIME VISUALS: LIST THE VISUALS THAT REPORTS CAN EXPECT INTERVIEWS: LIST STAFF AND/OR VOLUNTEERS THAT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEW ABOUT NRPM: During NRPM in November, NRS and its partners raise awareness of the runaway and homeless youth crisis and the issues that these young people face, as well as educate Americans about solutions and the role they can play in preventing and ending youth homelessness. This year’s theme ‘More Than Meets the Eye’ represents the full picture: the various at-risk and underserved youth populations affected, understanding all of the pieces of a youth’s situation to best give them help and hope, and the services available to do that. ABOUT YOUR ORG: GIVE MEDIA SOME MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR ORGANIZATION SAMPLE MEDIA ALERT
  • 15. ABOUT NRS: The National Runaway Safeline, formerly known as the National Runaway Switchboard, established in 1971, serves as the federally-designated national communication system for runaway, homeless and at-risk youth. NRS, with the support of more than 150 volunteers, makes more than 250,000 connections to help and hope through hotline (1-800-RUNAWAY), online (1800RUNAWAY.org), texting (66008) and offline resources. NRS provides crisis intervention, referrals to local resources, and education and prevention services to youth, families and community members throughout the country 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. More than 15,000 youth have been reunited with their families through NRS’ Home Free program done in collaboration with Greyhound Lines, Inc. For more information, visit 1800RUNAWAY.org. CONTACT: PROVIDE NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER, AND EMAIL OF CONTACT PERSON ››PG 14 NRPM 2015 TOOLKIT 14 MEDIA AND PRESS CONT.

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