PORESO2015
Philosophical Transactions to
the Finch report
The events that defined academic dissemination
Nick Sheppard
9th...
Repository Developer
• Began working at Leeds Metropolitan
University in 2007
• Repositories Start-up and Enhancement
proj...
Academic dissemination: The
problem with the status-quo
The Open Access movement
Open Access (OA) means that items of scholarly work are made
available online, in a digital forma...
HEFCE Policy for open access
in the post-2014 Research
Excellence Framework
“to be eligible for submission to the post-201...
The problem with Status Quo
*Status Quo at the Hammersmith Odeon in 1978
1978* 2005
In the beginning was the Word
Language:
the primal
technology
(approx.
100,000yrs)
Oral tradition
Cuneiform
(3000-3500
BCE...
Source http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1665_phil_trans_vol_i_title.png
This image is in the public domain because i...
Serials crisis
• C19th and C20th
• Number of universities/
associated research output
increased
• Market with established ...
Stevan Harnad’s subversive
proposal (1994)
“If all scholars' preprints were universally available to all scholars by anony...
Budapest Open Access Initiative
(2002)
“An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an
unprecede...
Seismic shift
• The Finch report (2012)
• Emphasised gold over green
• 5 year "transition period“
• Average APC ≈ £1800
• ...
RCUK policy (April 2012)
• RCUK-compliant journals
• Offer suitable gold OR suitable
green option
• Creative Commons-Attri...
HEFCE policy: a new chapter
• Arms race with commercial publishers
– “Online first”
– Embargoes (SHERPA/RoMEO)
• Is green ...
Social media and the
academy: network effects
• Academic blogs
• Facebook / Twitter
• OA and impact
– http://sparceurope.o...
Alternative metrics
• Various flavours
– Plum analytics -
http://www.plumanalytics.com/
– Impact story - https://impactsto...
Online networks
https://twitter.com/BeckettResearch/lists/leeds-beckett-university/members
Promoting research through
events
http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/world_diabetes_day
http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac....
References & bibliography
• Suber, P. Open Access Overview. Available at: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm ...
Philosophical Transactions to the Finch report: the events that have defined academic dissemination
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Philosophical Transactions to the Finch report: the events that have defined academic dissemination

Throughout history the creation and dissemination of knowledge has been influenced by innumerable ‘events’, cultural, technological and political in nature; from the invention of Cuneiform to the rise and fall of Classical civilizations and cultural incubation by the Catholic Church through the European Dark Ages to the Enlightenment. The invention of the printing press is obviously pivotal and in 1665 Henry Oldenburg inaugurated the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (Phil Trans), utilising print technology to establish the principles of scientific priority and peer review that have defined scientific discourse ever since. In the 20th Century scholarly publishing became exploited by commercial academic publishers and, as journal prices began to outstrip inflation, ultimately resulted in the “serials crisis” of the 1970s. These unsustainable price rises coincided with emergence of the internet and in 1990 Stevan Harnad introduced Psycoloquy, the first peer-reviewed online scientific journal which paved the way for free academic publishing on the web after 1993. In spite of this, and with the World Wide Web over 2 decades old, the traditional subscription model persists, dominated by multinational corporations that generate huge profits and restrict access to scholarly material. The Open Access movement is a worldwide effort to make scholarly work available online to everyone regardless of their ability to pay for access and in 2011 David Willetts set up a Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings, chaired by Dame Janet Finch and publishing the so called “Finch report” in 2012. The HEFCE policy on OA that comes into effect in 2016 perhaps represents the most recent cultural and political event in this space. This paper will explore the events that continue to influence academic dissemination and examine how Universities and academics themselves, particularly early career researchers, can utilise modern technology to be part of their own open knowledge event.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Philosophical Transactions to the Finch report: the events that have defined academic dissemination

  • 1. PORESO2015 Philosophical Transactions to the Finch report The events that defined academic dissemination Nick Sheppard 9th June 2015
  • 2. Repository Developer • Began working at Leeds Metropolitan University in 2007 • Repositories Start-up and Enhancement projects (Jisc) • Technical Officer for UKCoRR (UK Council of Research Repositories) • http://ukcorr.org/ • Over 300 members • Repository practitioners across UK HE
  • 3. Academic dissemination: The problem with the status-quo
  • 4. The Open Access movement Open Access (OA) means that items of scholarly work are made available online, in a digital format, at no charge to the reader and with limited restrictions on re-use. The OA movement is a worldwide effort to make scholarly work available online to everyone regardless of their ability to pay for access. Arguments for OA: • maximises research impact • maximises the use of public funds • accelerates research and increases impact • ethical practice • ensures compliance with funder requirements
  • 5. HEFCE Policy for open access in the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework “to be eligible for submission to the post-2014 REF, authors’ final peer-reviewed manuscripts must have been deposited in an institutional or subject repository on acceptance for publication” http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2014/201407/ • Self-archiving or “green” Open Access • Applies to journal articles and conference proceedings accepted for publication after 1 April 2016 • Where there is an embargo, authors can comply by making a ‘closed’ deposit on acceptance • Various exceptions
  • 6. The problem with Status Quo *Status Quo at the Hammersmith Odeon in 1978 1978* 2005
  • 7. In the beginning was the Word Language: the primal technology (approx. 100,000yrs) Oral tradition Cuneiform (3000-3500 BCE) Classical civilizations and proto- science (900 BCE – 500 CE) European Dark Ages (500-1000 CE) The Renaissance (1400 CE – 1700 CE) Invention of printing press (≈1440 CE) Caxton brings printing press to Britain (≈1476 CE) Henry Oldenburg inaugurates PhilTrans (1665 CE) Universities / research output increased (C19th -> C20th) ARPANET (1969) “Serials crisis” (1970s) WWW invented (1989) 1st peer- reviewed scientific journal on the internet (1990) Stevan Harnad’s “Subversive proposal” (1994) Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) Mainstream social media (2000 – Future) Academic social media (2007 – Future) Finch report (2012) RCUK policy (2012) HEFCE announce Policy for OA in post-2014 REF (2014) PORESO 2015 April 1st 2016 The Future
  • 8. Source http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1665_phil_trans_vol_i_title.png This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Henry_Oldenburg.jpg This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.
  • 9. Serials crisis • C19th and C20th • Number of universities/ associated research output increased • Market with established creative source & pattern of consumption • Unsustainable price rises of traditionally published journals • 1990 - Stevan Harnad introduced Psycoloquy, the first peer- reviewed scientific journal on the internet • Paved the way for free academic publishing on the web after 1993
  • 10. Stevan Harnad’s subversive proposal (1994) “If all scholars' preprints were universally available to all scholars by anonymous ftp (and gopher, and World-Wide Web, and the search/retrieval wonders of the future), NO scholar would ever consent to WITHDRAW any preprint of his from the public eye after the refereed version was accepted for paper "PUBLICation." Instead, everyone would, quite naturally, substitute the refereed, published reprint for the unrefereed preprint.” http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/253351/ “one of the seminal texts of the open access movement” Richard Poynder June 2014
  • 11. Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) “An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good…Removing access barriers to this literature will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge.” Recommend two complementary strategies: • Self-archiving (green) • Open-access Journals (gold)
  • 12. Seismic shift • The Finch report (2012) • Emphasised gold over green • 5 year "transition period“ • Average APC ≈ £1800 • Robbing Peter to pay Paul? • Criticised by OA advocates • Influence of publishing lobby? • Market forces will drive APCs down (won't they??)
  • 13. RCUK policy (April 2012) • RCUK-compliant journals • Offer suitable gold OR suitable green option • Creative Commons-Attribution (CC-BY) • RCUK OA block grants • Establish institutional publication funds • expect primary use to be payments of APCs • Preference is gold OA • Decision lies with authors and institutions
  • 14. HEFCE policy: a new chapter • Arms race with commercial publishers – “Online first” – Embargoes (SHERPA/RoMEO) • Is green a long term solution? • Is gold sustainable? • Books and monographs? • e-theses – EThOS - http://ethos.bl.uk/ • Open Data • What might a new paradigm look like? • Institutional/library publishing? – PKP - Open Journal System e.g. http://journals.ed.ac.uk/ – UCL Press – Open Library of the Humanities
  • 15. Social media and the academy: network effects • Academic blogs • Facebook / Twitter • OA and impact – http://sparceurope.org/oaca/ • Academic tools – Mendeley – Figshare – academia.edu – ResearchGate • Article level metrics • Alternative or “altmetrics”
  • 16. Alternative metrics • Various flavours – Plum analytics - http://www.plumanalytics.com/ – Impact story - https://impactstory.org/ – Altmetric - http://www.altmetric.com/ • Article level metrics – frontiers in Psychology http://journal.frontiersin.org/a rticle/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00 058/abstract – PLoS One http://journals.plos.org/ploso ne/article?id=10.1371/journa l.pone.0121708 – Repositories – IRUS-UK – Statistics at Leeds Beckett • The end of JIF?
  • 17. Online networks https://twitter.com/BeckettResearch/lists/leeds-beckett-university/members
  • 18. Promoting research through events http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/world_diabetes_day http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/IWD2014 http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/Budget2014 http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/LeTour2014 http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/MentalHealthAwareness http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/daw2015 http://libguides.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/menshealthweek2015
  • 19. References & bibliography • Suber, P. Open Access Overview. Available at: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm [Accessed 17 November 2014] • Guédon, J.-C. (2001) In Oldenburg’s long shadow: librarians, research scientists, publishers, and the control of scientific publishing. Available at: http://eprints.rclis.org/6375/ [Accessed 17 November 2016] • Budapest Open Access Initiative (2002) Available at: http://www.soros.org/openaccess/read.shtml [Accessed 17 November 2014] • Yiotis, K. (2005) The Open Access Initiative: a new paradigm for scholarly communications. Information Technology and Libraries 24(4). Available at: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/3378 [Accessed 17th November 2014] • Monbiot, G. (2011). The Lairds of Learning | George Monbiot. [online] Monbiot.com. Available at: http://www.monbiot.com/2011/08/29/the-lairds-of-learning/ [Accessed 17 Nov. 2014]. • Accessibility, sustainability, excellence: how to expand access to research publications: Report of the Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings (June 2012) Available at http://www.researchinfonet.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Finch- Group-report-FINAL-VERSION.pdf [Accessed 17 November 2014] • RCUK Policy on Open Access (April 2012) Available at http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/openaccess/policy/ [Accessed 17 November 2014] • HEFCE (2013) Policy for open access in the post-2014 Research Excellence Framework Available at http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/year/2014/201407/ [Accessed 17 November 2014]