Narrative and Voice
Focalization:
•Term coined by Genette
•Reformulation of : “perspective”
and “point of view”
•Restricting of info by a narr...
• 1. Zero: Narrator
>
Character
• 2. Internal: Narrator =
Character
• 3. External: Narrator
<
• Esther > central
consciousness +heroine
• Novel’s concentration > on
Esther’s view of her story
>> Internal focalizatio...
• Narrative restricted to
Esther’s experience
• It is a third-person narrative
• The following passage, describing Esther’s
experience of losing and regaining
consciousness under chloroform, is typical...
Other characters > described from the
outside.
Esther’ s experiences > direct information
Narrative > what Esther witnesse...
• Esther’s observation of the race is
limited by her restricted view.
>> Narrator attached to Esther
There were two or thr...
• Direct reference to the thoughts,
perceptions and emotions of Esther
which may be subjective.
>> Includes Esther’s know...
• Views and attitudes of Esther
• Esther thinks about the objects
around her according to what she
should do with them.
Th...
•
Judgments of Esther
He had gone through the baize door, and no doubt
was sitting by Peggy in the new drawing-room. He
...
References
•Chapman, S. (2002). 'From their Point of
View': voice and speech in George Moore's
Esther Waters. Sage.
•Flude...
of 12

Narrative and Voice

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Spiritual      Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narrative and Voice

  • 1. Narrative and Voice
  • 2. Focalization: •Term coined by Genette •Reformulation of : “perspective” and “point of view” •Restricting of info by a narrator about characters
  • 3. • 1. Zero: Narrator > Character • 2. Internal: Narrator = Character • 3. External: Narrator <
  • 4. • Esther > central consciousness +heroine • Novel’s concentration > on Esther’s view of her story >> Internal focalization
  • 5. • Narrative restricted to Esther’s experience • It is a third-person narrative
  • 6. • The following passage, describing Esther’s experience of losing and regaining consciousness under chloroform, is typical of this style: He placed a small wire case over her mouth and nose. The sickly odor which she breathed from the cotton wool filled her brain with nausea; it seemed to choke her; life faded a little, and at every inhalation she expected to lose sight of the circle of faces. And then darkness began to lighten; night passed into dawn; she could hear voices, and when her eyes opened the doctors and nurses were
  • 7. Other characters > described from the outside. Esther’ s experiences > direct information Narrative > what Esther witnesses
  • 8. • Esther’s observation of the race is limited by her restricted view. >> Narrator attached to Esther There were two or three false starts, and then, looking through the multitude of hats, Esther saw five or six thin greyhoundlooking horses. They passed like shadows, flitted by; and she was sorry for the poor chestnut that trotted in among the crowd.
  • 9. • Direct reference to the thoughts, perceptions and emotions of Esther which may be subjective. >> Includes Esther’s knowledge or ignorance Esther thought him a nice little fellow, and tried to persuade him to forgo his resolution not to touch pudding, until Mr Swindles told her to cheese it. The attention of the table being drawn to the boy, Esther wondered at the admiration
  • 10. • Views and attitudes of Esther • Esther thinks about the objects around her according to what she should do with them. There were plates to wash and knives to clean, and when they were done there were potatoes, cabbage, onions to prepare, saucepans to fill with water, coal to fetch for the fire…
  • 11. • Judgments of Esther He had gone through the baize door, and no doubt was sitting by Peggy in the new drawing-room. He had gone where she could not follow. He had gone where the grand folk lived in idleness, in the sinfulness of the world and the flesh, eating and gambling, thinking of nothing else, with servants to wait on them, obeying their orders and saving them from every trouble.
  • 12. References •Chapman, S. (2002). 'From their Point of View': voice and speech in George Moore's Esther Waters. Sage. •Fludernik, M. (n.d.). New Wine in Old Bottles? Voice, Focalization, and New Writing. In new literary history (pp. 619-638).