Population Mobility & Labour Markets Project
The Issue
• High levels of temporary mobility among Aboriginal people living in
remote communities
• Highly mobile populat...
Project Objectives
• To enhance economic participation and livelihoods and for
Aboriginal people in remote Australia throu...
Project Methodology
• Two stage sampling frame:
• Sample of 25 remote communities in which residents would
access Alice Sp...
5
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Mobility
• From first engagement, mobility patterns have been seen as
‘problematic’:...
Key lessons from the literature
• The traditional drivers of kinship, culture and country have proven to
be extremely resi...
Re-conceptualisation of mobility
“Mobility is a means to access those things that
contribute to wellbeing, and to avoid th...
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
livelihoods in remote Australia
Health
Employment Family & kin
connections
Education...
Some preliminary findings:
10
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Food &
grocery
shopping
Other
shopping
Banking Health Centrelink Car
service...
Trips away from the community
to access services
• In total 19 times per year
• Most common services:
• Shopping for food ...
Trips involving an overnight stay outside of the
community – activities undertaken
12
Barriers to mobility
• Of persons aged 17 and over, only 41% held a current driver’s license.
13
Can you always get access...
Barriers to mobility
• 1 in 3 wanted to make a trip but couldn’t in the past 12 months.
14
What stops you travelling?
0 5 ...
Issues of Vehicle Access
Major labour market implications
Proportion in employment
With driver’s licence 54%
Without drive...
Preliminary findings
• High mobility is NOT the issue!
• Country, culture and kinship remain key drivers of mobility:
• Be...
Preliminary findings
• Sustainability of remote communities
• Good policy and planning decisions require understanding
how...
Project Partners
• Australian Bureau of Statistics
• Central Land Council
• Charles Darwin University
• Curtin University
...
of 18

Population Mobility & Labour Markets Project

Mike Dockery presented to the Ninti Networks on 2 June 2015 at The Residency in Alice Springs.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Data & Analytics      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Population Mobility & Labour Markets Project

  • 1. Population Mobility & Labour Markets Project
  • 2. The Issue • High levels of temporary mobility among Aboriginal people living in remote communities • Highly mobile populations: • Creates barriers to economic participation  Education  Employment • Creates challenges for the delivery of services • Creates challenges for provision of infrastructure 2
  • 3. Project Objectives • To enhance economic participation and livelihoods and for Aboriginal people in remote Australia through: • better understanding of the factors driving temporary mobility • empirical estimates of the extent and patterns of temporary mobility. • Improved planning and decision-making by communities, service providers, policy-makers and employers. 3
  • 4. Project Methodology • Two stage sampling frame: • Sample of 25 remote communities in which residents would access Alice Springs as regional service centre • Sample of individuals aged 15+ within communities 4 • One ‘baseline’ survey with four quarterly follow-up surveys to capture seasonal variation in mobility • Ultimately a ‘convenience sample’ to some extent
  • 5. 5
  • 6. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mobility • From first engagement, mobility patterns have been seen as ‘problematic’: • Initially seen as random and unproductive • The many policies to ‘civilise’ and ‘assimilate’ had the deliberate aim of sedentisation • To this day, mobility seen as inconsistent with mainstream models of service delivery and attempts to ‘Close the Gap’. 6
  • 7. Key lessons from the literature • The traditional drivers of kinship, culture and country have proven to be extremely resilient • “Attachment to place and community prevail, irrespective of a history of changing government policies. There appears no reason to expect that these attachments will change in the foreseeable future.” (Memmott et al. 2006) • “Even after 200 years of colonisation … involving radical dispossession of Aboriginal groups and … severe curtailment of their freedom to move around their country, nearly 70% … recognised a homeland or traditional country” (Morhpy 2010) 7
  • 8. Re-conceptualisation of mobility “Mobility is a means to access those things that contribute to wellbeing, and to avoid those things that contribute to illbeing” 8
  • 9. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander livelihoods in remote Australia Health Employment Family & kin connections Education Wellbeing Culture Income Country
  • 10. Some preliminary findings: 10 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Food & grocery shopping Other shopping Banking Health Centrelink Car service/parts Averagetripsperyear Trips away from the community to access services
  • 11. Trips away from the community to access services • In total 19 times per year • Most common services: • Shopping for food & groceries • Other shopping • Banking • Health • For those who travel to Alice Springs, average of 865 kilometres per month • Maximum of 15,000 kms per month 11
  • 12. Trips involving an overnight stay outside of the community – activities undertaken 12
  • 13. Barriers to mobility • Of persons aged 17 and over, only 41% held a current driver’s license. 13 Can you always get access to a vehicle if you need one? 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Yes Most of the time Sometimes Not very often Only in an emergency No Percent
  • 14. Barriers to mobility • 1 in 3 wanted to make a trip but couldn’t in the past 12 months. 14 What stops you travelling? 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Children/kids Family reasons Busy working No licensed driver No safe vehicle Culture Can't get a ride Not enough money Per cent
  • 15. Issues of Vehicle Access Major labour market implications Proportion in employment With driver’s licence 54% Without driver’s licence 23% High vehicle access (always/most of the time) 43% Low vehicle access 28% 15
  • 16. Preliminary findings • High mobility is NOT the issue! • Country, culture and kinship remain key drivers of mobility: • Because these are intrinsic to their wellbeing • 86.5% of respondents living on homelands • People travel vast distance to access services • Large potential gains from innovations in service delivery and from improved transport networks. • Barriers to mobility limit livelihoods in remote communities • Limit service access • Dramatically limit employment opportunities 16
  • 17. Preliminary findings • Sustainability of remote communities • Good policy and planning decisions require understanding how people will respond to different incentives. • Will not readily sever ties to kin and country • Negative effects on those displaced • Those costs need to be weighed against benefits of alternatives: • Improving service access • Improving transport networks, housing and other infrastructure • Promoting community based enterprise and employment. 17
  • 18. Project Partners • Australian Bureau of Statistics • Central Land Council • Charles Darwin University • Curtin University • Northern Territory Government • Prime Minister and Cabinet, Australian Government • Tangentyere Council • University of South Australia • Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi • Western Australian Government 18

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