NitiAayog–CentreForPolicyResearchOpenSeminar Series
 
“Conceptualising Zero-Waste in India under Swachh Bharat:
Possibil...
2nd NITI Aayog – Centre for Policy Research:
Open Seminar Series
Zero waste in India : Some Policy questions
Shubhagato Da...
Zero waste : history of the concept
•  The genesis of the zero waste concept : The term Zero Waste has its origins in the ...
Zero waste : history of the concept
•  The zero waste concept accompanied rising concerns of environmental
pollution and t...
Zero waste : drivers and spread of the concept
•  Drivers for the Zero waste approach in many parts of the world
•  Waste ...
From a linear to a circular but hierarchical process
Natural Resources / Raw
Material Input
Production
(Manufacturing,
dis...
Zero waste in MSW in India : Policy questions
•  Central role of local government in generating awareness for improving
wa...
Zero waste in MSW in India : Policy questions
•  Beyondthelocalbody– how can the States and the National government
furthe...
Thank
you
Agenda
15:00-­‐15:05 Introduc=on
 &
 Welcome
Ms.
 Sindhushree
 Khullar,
 CEO,
 Ni=
 
Aayog
15:05–1...
of 9

Zero Waste in India : Some Policy Questions (by Shubhagato Dasgupta, Senior Fellow, CPR)

Presentation from the 2nd CPR-NITI Aayog Seminar on Zero Waste
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Zero Waste in India : Some Policy Questions (by Shubhagato Dasgupta, Senior Fellow, CPR)

  • 1. NitiAayog–CentreForPolicyResearchOpenSeminar Series   “Conceptualising Zero-Waste in India under Swachh Bharat: Possibilities & Challenges”   Monday,29th June 2015,15:00–16:30 hrs   Room 122 Niti Aayog,Sansad Marg,New Delhi 110001
  • 2. 2nd NITI Aayog – Centre for Policy Research: Open Seminar Series Zero waste in India : Some Policy questions Shubhagato Dasgupta, Senior Fellow Theory  on  the  sampling  methodology
  • 3. Zero waste : history of the concept •  The genesis of the zero waste concept : The term Zero Waste has its origins in the industrial efficiancy concepts developed in Japan of total quality management (TQM) and ideas such as ‘zero defects’, that helped producers like Toshiba achieve results as low as one defect per million in manufacturing. •  The concept of zero waste was first used by Paul Palmer in New Zealand in 1973. Zero Waste forces attention onto the whole lifecycle of products. •  ZW strategy is based on the hierarchy of 3Rs, 1.  Reduce 2.  Reuse 3.  Recycle, along with producer responsibility and eco-design •  “Zero waste” reads as contradiction in words “ Just as there can be no light without shadow, so useful matter, to have meaning, requires its opposite – useless waste... If waste didn't exist we would have to invent it” Robin Murray 2002. •  “The right question to ask, is not whether Zero Waste can be achieved, but how can it be used as a policy driver,…” Zero Waste by Robin Murray 2002. •  It's a concept that applies to •  Industrial waste •  Wastewater •  Municipal Solid Waste – which is the focus for today
  • 4. Zero waste : history of the concept •  The zero waste concept accompanied rising concerns of environmental pollution and the Mainstreaming of Sustainability in Development  •”The human ecological footprint can not continue to grow at the rate seen from 1900 to 1972….”, Limits toGrowth (ClubofRome1972) •“The overall aim of achieving sustainable development through the conservation of living resources“, WorldConservationStrategy (IUCN &WWF1980) •“Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs“, OurCommonFuture (WCED1987) •Agenda 21 adopted at the EarthSummit (UNCED1992)
  • 5. Zero waste : drivers and spread of the concept •  Drivers for the Zero waste approach in many parts of the world •  Waste has moved from the margins to the mainstream for policy makers. •  The prime factors include : •  awareness of the pollution caused by the disposal of waste •  recognition of the significance of waste for – climate change and resource depletion •  Increased community voice around Locally Unwanted Land Uses(LULU) and NIMBY (Not in My Backyard) related to waste disposal facilities •  The practice started in Northern Europe and New Zealand but now more far reaching •  India has had some early and interesting approaches, some now trying to get to city wide scale •  Kovallam, Exnora Vellore, Chintan, others •  Pune, Mysore, Ahmedabad plans, others •  E-waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 2011 and Plastic Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 2011 •  Now part of the model Urban and Regional Development Plans Formulation and Implementation Guidelines (URDPFI, 2015)
  • 6. From a linear to a circular but hierarchical process Natural Resources / Raw Material Input Production (Manufacturing, distribution,etc.) Consumption Discarding Treatment (Recycling,incineration, etc.) Landfill disposal First:  Reduc-on   Reduce  waste,  by-­‐products,  etc.   Second:  Reuse   Use  items  repeatedly   Fourth:  Thermal  Recycling   Recover  heat  from  items  which  have  no  alterna-ves  but   incinera=on  and  which  cannot  be  recycled  materially   Third:  Material   Recycling   Recycle  items   which  can’t  be   re-­‐used  as  raw   materials   Fi:h:  Proper  Disposal   Dispose  of  items  which  cannot  be  used  by  any  means
  • 7. Zero waste in MSW in India : Policy questions •  Central role of local government in generating awareness for improving waste management – whattypesofpolicysupportfrom State Governments and National Government help? •  Most geographies moved to zero waste approaches – after putting in place secure waste management processes. What mix of policies can pursue the zero waste approach alongside the building of basic sanitation infrastructure for collection, transport and sanitary landfilling? •  How should citylevelinvestmentsbephasedto strengthen the 3 R hierarchy, without compromising on the current day health and environmental impacts? •  How can cities ensure that capital investment they make in terms of treatment and disposal facilities do not have alockdownontheamountof feedstockwhich places a cap on minimisation, reuse and recycling? •  If PPPs are implemented – how can one ensure this critical issue?
  • 8. Zero waste in MSW in India : Policy questions •  Beyondthelocalbody– how can the States and the National government further support Reduction, Reuse and Material Recovery across MSW? •  What version of the extendedproducerresponsibilityapproach to Reuse work in India? •  Individual or collective stewardship? Shared responsibility or full EPR? •  What policy approaches could help mitigate the Impacts on livelihoods andbusinesses? •  Would a frameworklegislationaroundMSWwork in India's federal structure? •  Could the NITI Aayog be the agency to develop a negotiatedmediumterm planwith State Governments and local governments to move towards 3 R
  • 9. Thank you Agenda 15:00-­‐15:05 Introduc=on  &  Welcome Ms.  Sindhushree  Khullar,  CEO,  Ni=   Aayog 15:05–15:15 Zero-­‐waste  in  India:  Some   Policy  Ques=ons   Mr.  Shubhagato  Dasgupta,  Senior   Fellow,  Centre  for  Policy  Research 15:15-­‐15:35 Presenta=on:  Mo=va=ng   ci=zens  and  administra=on  for   zero-­‐waste  ci=es:  The  case  of   Pune,  India Mr.  Kunal  Kumar,  Commissioner,  Pune   Municipal  Corpora=on 15:35-­‐15:55 Presenta=on:  Pathways  to   Zero  Waste  in  the  Indian   Context Dr.  Ashish  Chaturvedi,  Research   Fellow,  Green  Transforma=ons   Cluster,  Ins=tute  of  Development   Studies,  University  of  Sussex 15:55-­‐16:30 Open  discussion Moderated  by  Ms.  Sindhushree   Khullar,  CEO,  Ni=  Aayog

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