Rekha a/p Kanniah (Malaysia)
Norasyanti Mohd Nor (Malaysia)
Noraini Ismail (Malaysia)
Farah Zazreen Zainudin (Malaysia)...
Country Profile
 Formal name : Kingdom of Bhutan
 Citizens : Bhutanese
 Capital : Thimpu
 Date of Independence : A...
Gross National Happiness (GNH)
Establish by His Majesty the Fourth King of Bhutan: Jigme
Singye Wangchuck in 1970.
The ...
Lately four pillars – classified into nine domains:
i. Psychological wellbeing
ii. Health
iii. Education
iv. Time use ...
Highlights about GNH Index in 2010
Men are happier than women on average.
 In urban areas, 50% of people are happy and...
Population Economy Poverty
Governance Education Health
To confronting the rapid population growth of 3.1% per
year and its demands, including:
 dependency ratio, jobs, school...
 To raise real incomes of rural people and create a
domestic market for increased production.
 More efficient system o...
 Expanded access to social
services/infrastructure, particularly in rural
areas and to vulnerable groups.
 Increased ...
 To promote GNH, through efficiency, transparency,
accountability, participation and equity, to bring
about socio-econo...
 To find ways to finance expansion of the
system regardless quality.
 Quality education for all without gender gap ,
...
 To provides free medical treatment to all
citizens, and for the Royal Government is to
focusing on quality health care...
• Bhutan’s Development is guided by the document “Bhutan 2020: A Vision for
Peace, Prosperity and Happiness”, that sets o...
• The main institutions are the Gewogs, Dzongkhags and the central ministries and
agencies.
• Most programs originate fr...
Agriculture, Marketing and Enterprise
Promotion Programme
 AMEPP was IFAD’s sixth project in Bhutan.
 Effective from 1 July 2006 and was completed
on 31 December 2012.
 The p...
 AMEPP covered 6 dzongkhags (districts) in
Eastern Bhutan − Samdrup Jongkhar,
Pemagatshel, Trashigang, Mongar, Trashi
...
i. Supporting capital formation in crop, livestock and
niche-crop production.
ii. Improving the conditions under which e...
On-farm
production
Marketing &
enterprise
development
Rural financial
services
Access
Infrastructure
Program
man...
• Rated as satisfactory on the basis of programme
alignment with national strategic directions. Relevance
• Rated as sat...
• Rated as satisfactory as the extent of benefits across
the target area was variable with some households
achieving hig...
• The result is positive but limited resources
for environmental protection. The rating
for natural resources and enviro...
• Rated moderately satisfactory as there are
challenges. Sustainability
• Some initiatives have been scaled up, but this...
 The project has been successful with the support of IFAD.
( International Fund for Agriculture Development)
 The proj...
Shift from production-driven to value-adding
and market-led capability
 The project impact on agriculture production
...
 A key bottleneck in building capacity in enterprise development and
value chain linkages has been dependence on agricul...
 Groups are still dependent on government support rather
than proactively finding their own business opportunities.
 H...
 Planning is really important
 Forecast the future
 Achieve target/goal
THE END
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
National Development Planning of Bhutan
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National Development Planning of Bhutan

Presentation from student Master of Economics from Universiti Putra Malaysia year 2014.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Economy & Finance      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National Development Planning of Bhutan

  • 1. Rekha a/p Kanniah (Malaysia) Norasyanti Mohd Nor (Malaysia) Noraini Ismail (Malaysia) Farah Zazreen Zainudin (Malaysia) Halimatun Nazira Haji Hasan (Malaysia) Noradila Awang (Malaysia) NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING OF BHUTAN
  • 2. Country Profile  Formal name : Kingdom of Bhutan  Citizens : Bhutanese  Capital : Thimpu  Date of Independence : August 8, 1949  Land lock between China and Tibet.  Population is 1.6 million with 97 % in rural area.
  • 3. Gross National Happiness (GNH) Establish by His Majesty the Fourth King of Bhutan: Jigme Singye Wangchuck in 1970. The 4 Pillars concept of GNH: 1. Good Governance 2. Socio-economic development 3. Cultural preservation 4. Environmental conservation
  • 4. Lately four pillars – classified into nine domains: i. Psychological wellbeing ii. Health iii. Education iv. Time use v. Cultural diversity and resilience vi. Good governance vii. Community vitality viii. Ecological diversity and resilience ix. Living standard
  • 5. Highlights about GNH Index in 2010 Men are happier than women on average.  In urban areas, 50% of people are happy and in rural areas it is 37 %.  Urban areas do better in health, education and living of standard. Rural areas do better in community vitality, cultural resilience and good governance.
  • 6. Population Economy Poverty Governance Education Health
  • 7. To confronting the rapid population growth of 3.1% per year and its demands, including:  dependency ratio, jobs, school-age population and health care services  dealing with continued momentum for growth despite declining fertility  keeping up with population distribution issues in urban areas  generating disaggregated data in all sectors,to enable better planning and formulating of more efficient interventions aimed at disparity reduction.
  • 8.  To raise real incomes of rural people and create a domestic market for increased production.  More efficient system of financial intermediation to raise the overall level of economic activity as well as the ratio of investment and savings to GDP; the importance of a monetary policy that addresses development and integration of the capital market is crucial.
  • 9.  Expanded access to social services/infrastructure, particularly in rural areas and to vulnerable groups.  Increased employment generation to address the growing urbanization that has critical implications for poverty nationwide.  Extended credit outreach to the poor.
  • 10.  To promote GNH, through efficiency, transparency, accountability, participation and equity, to bring about socio-economic development, especially for rural areas.  To strike a balance between popular participation in development and the gradual transfer of power to lower echelons of Government for an enabling environment of growing development complexities and building laws upon Buddhist precepts.
  • 11.  To find ways to finance expansion of the system regardless quality.  Quality education for all without gender gap , including provision of sufficient and adequate hostel facilities for girls.
  • 12.  To provides free medical treatment to all citizens, and for the Royal Government is to focusing on quality health care.  Continued to reduction of infant, under 5 and maternal morbidity and mortality, as well as malnutrition; cervical cancer, and to reduce growing number of illegal abortions.
  • 13. • Bhutan’s Development is guided by the document “Bhutan 2020: A Vision for Peace, Prosperity and Happiness”, that sets out the national goals, broad targets and overall policy principles for the next two decades. • This document was the culmination of intensive consultations between communities, Royal Government agencies and private and non-governmental organizations. It provides a clear framework for development of the five-year plans and is operationalized through the annual budgets approved by the National Assembly. • The planning process involves decision-making in formulating plans and programs, the responsibility of which is shared among a number of institutions. The main institutions are the Gewogs, Dzongkhags and the central ministries and agencies.
  • 14. • The main institutions are the Gewogs, Dzongkhags and the central ministries and agencies. • Most programs originate from the community level though nation-wide and thematic plans and programs can originate from the agencies at the centre. • The preparation of the five-year plans begins at least two years ahead of the scheduled launch. • It normally follows a mid-term review of the on-going plan where the Gewogs, Dzongkhags and sectors are involved. • Next is the steps taken by Gewogs in preparation for the Five Years Plan.
  • 15. Agriculture, Marketing and Enterprise Promotion Programme
  • 16.  AMEPP was IFAD’s sixth project in Bhutan.  Effective from 1 July 2006 and was completed on 31 December 2012.  The project’s objective: “improve livelihoods of the rural poor in the programme area on a sustainable basis by enhancing productivity, income growth and access to economic and social services”.
  • 17.  AMEPP covered 6 dzongkhags (districts) in Eastern Bhutan − Samdrup Jongkhar, Pemagatshel, Trashigang, Mongar, Trashi Yangtse and Lhuentse (from 2006 to 2012)  One of the poorest and most isolated region in Bhutan.  Most agriculture is carried out by smallholders on less than 5 acres (2 ha) of land per household.
  • 18. i. Supporting capital formation in crop, livestock and niche-crop production. ii. Improving the conditions under which enterprises and income–generating activities are started and operated. iii. Enhancing access to rural financial services (especially credit). iv. Building the capacities of grass-roots organizations and developing skills through training. v. Improving the common socio-economic infrastructure, especially the road network and marketing support system.
  • 19. On-farm production Marketing & enterprise development Rural financial services Access Infrastructure Program management
  • 20. • Rated as satisfactory on the basis of programme alignment with national strategic directions. Relevance • Rated as satisfactory as the overall combination of project inputs effectiveness in raising production and reducing input and marketing costs was appropriate. Effectiveness • Rated moderately satisfactory as the infrastructure activities were not able to complete design specification in relation to recommended best practise. Efficiency
  • 21. • Rated as satisfactory as the extent of benefits across the target area was variable with some households achieving high levels of performance and others with little benefit. Household income and assets • Rated as satisfactory as few groups are still at a formative stage and there is still considerable need for further development. Human and social capital empowerment • If AMEPP hadn’t supported a shift of farming practice, food quality wouldn’t have improved and the cost of food would have been higher due to the transportation costs of importation. Hence, the rating is satisfactory. Food security and agricultural productivity
  • 22. • The result is positive but limited resources for environmental protection. The rating for natural resources and environment is moderately satisfactory. Natural resources, environment and climate change • Rated moderately satisfactory impact on institutions and policies related to programme implementation. Institutions and policies
  • 23. • Rated moderately satisfactory as there are challenges. Sustainability • Some initiatives have been scaled up, but this has been in response to ad hoc opportunities rather than a proactive and systematic programme approach. Consequently, the rating is moderately satisfactory. Innovation and scaling up • Women do seem to have benefited from the programme and mainstreaming activities. The rating for this criterion is moderately satisfactory. Gender equality and women’s empowerment
  • 24.  The project has been successful with the support of IFAD. ( International Fund for Agriculture Development)  The project activities were effectively help in reducing the poverty level in targeted area.  Involvement of IFAD (International Fund for Agriculture Development) has clearly contributed in the improvement of connectivity and access to services, generate more income and assets for many household and greater farm and enterprise productivity.
  • 25. Shift from production-driven to value-adding and market-led capability  The project impact on agriculture production was far-reaching across the project area, although not of a high intensity.  An increase in production  However, the capacity in the east to capitalize on potential market opportunities and add value to agriculture production is still limited.
  • 26.  A key bottleneck in building capacity in enterprise development and value chain linkages has been dependence on agriculture staff to also carry out marketing support activities.  Agriculture officers are not qualified to offer business advice or to assist with financial support.  Thus, there is need for different skills and additional expertise particularly through the Department of Marketing and Cooperative to facilitate and strengthen value chain linkage within the region and across regional and national borders.
  • 27.  Groups are still dependent on government support rather than proactively finding their own business opportunities.  However, there is limited government services and give challenge for those who are in greater need of service.  There is need to build independence and private sector service especially for farmers who are affordable to pay commercial fees.
  • 28.  Planning is really important  Forecast the future  Achieve target/goal
  • 29. THE END

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