It was rather an interesting
mixture of travel accounts
and religious writings.
Written over a period of years by the leader of the Plymouth Colony in
Massachusetts, William Bradford. Of Plymouth Planta...
Bradford’s history is a blend of fact and
interpretation. The Bradford journal records
not only the events of the first 30...
.
SPELLING
Bradford, like all writers of his time , uses a
variety of spelling. A rule code for spelling
was unknown then an...
.
“He is a bad fisher who cannot kill
on one day with his hook and line,
one, two, or three hundred Cods”_
Claim (mtkiceba)m...
.
TEMPERANCE : Eat not to dullness ;
drink not to elevation
SILENCE: Speak not but what benefit others or
yourself; avoid tr...
National beginnings
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National beginnings
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National beginnings

From the History of American Literature
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National beginnings

  • 1. It was rather an interesting mixture of travel accounts and religious writings.
  • 2. Written over a period of years by the leader of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, William Bradford. Of Plymouth Plantation is a single most complete authority (avtoritetuli wyaro) for the story of the Pilgrims and the early years of the Colony they founded. Pilgrim [′pilgrim] _ a person who travels to a holy place for religious reasons
  • 3. Bradford’s history is a blend of fact and interpretation. The Bradford journal records not only the events of the first 30 years but also the reactions of the colonists. The Bradford journal is regarded by historians as the preeminent work of the 17-th century America. It is Bradford’s simple yet vivid story, as told in his journal, that has made the Pilgrims the much-loved “spiritual ancestors of all Americans” miCneuliagamoCenili cocxali (mogoneba, aRwera) narevi, nazavi
  • 4. .
  • 5. SPELLING Bradford, like all writers of his time , uses a variety of spelling. A rule code for spelling was unknown then and dictionaries uncommon. Consistency (Tanamimdevroba;mudmivoba) in spelling was not a virtue (marTlweras ar eqceoda yuradReba), even important state papers might reflect regional speech. In addition, there was f-shaped s which was used when letters were doubled or used initially. Bradford also uses common abbreviations such as ‘wt’ for ‘with’, and ‘yt’ for ‘that’ Being thus arrived in a good harbor and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees & blessed ye God of Heaven, who had brought them over ye vast & furious ocean, and delivered them from all ye periles & miseries therof, againe to set their feete on ye firme and stable earth, their proper elemente…
  • 6. .
  • 7. “He is a bad fisher who cannot kill on one day with his hook and line, one, two, or three hundred Cods”_ Claim (mtkiceba)made by Captain John Smith in “A Description of New England (1616)
  • 8. .
  • 9. TEMPERANCE : Eat not to dullness ; drink not to elevation SILENCE: Speak not but what benefit others or yourself; avoid triling conversation ORDER: Let all your thing have their places; let each part of your business have its time.