Linda R McMahan, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Emeritus, Department of Horticulture
Oregon State University
linda.mcmahan@oreg...
Why native plants?
The most reliable
species
Different plants for
different purposes
Which species attract
the wildlif...
Learn about some trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants and
groundcovers native to coastal Oregon or nearby areas
Learn where ...
Natives add or enhance
wildlife habitat
Look at all levels-trees
shrubs, herbaceous
plants and groundcovers
Match the r...
Take care of plants
for the first 2-5 years
after planting—some
will require additional
irrigation during this
time
Grou...
Native Plants are:
Already adapted to our
weather and soils
Reminders of our natural
surroundings
Support for local ins...
Housed at Oregon State University, this searchable site
has distribution information, printable maps, and
photographs. It...
This site provides correct
and current scientific
names, generates
printable maps of plant
distribution
This is the refere...
• Structure
• Shade
• Protection
• Vertical Interest
Trees in the
Landscape
Provide:
Grand fir, Abies grandis and
western ...
A shorter relative of the
lodgepole pine but with
highly different
characteristics – lower
stature and wetter habitat
Na...
Stately tree
Use large leaves for
weed suppression or
compost
Once established
requires no added
water, but can support...
Bigleaf maple
Grows near but
not in water
Sun, part sun
Mature tree can
be very tall
Native to the Pacific
Coast
Evergreen
Supports bird life
Sun, part sun
Mature tree can be
very tall
http://oregonstat...
machine-readable source
provided. Own work assumed
(based on copyright claims)., CC
BY 2.5,
https://commons.wikimedia.org/...
Graceful
understory tree,
prefers part
shade where it
“twines”
Slow growing
Readily available
• Light shade
• Drier areas
• March blooms
• “Plums” bird food
• Easy to grow
• Shelter
• Erosion Control
• Wildlife Value
• Eye Level Interest
• Garden “structure”
Shrubs in the
Landscape
Provide:
Re...
Mock orange –
Philadelphus lewisii
• Fragrant,
• Good nectar
source
• Fast grower,
• Drought
tolerant
• Sun, part shade
• ...
Mock Orange
Full sun in drier areas
Bank stabilizer,
spreads underground
Flowers provide
nectar, hips are food
for wildlife
Host f...
Evergreen, forms
colonies
Berries and nectar
support wildlife
State flower of
Oregon
Widely available
Native to coastal
climates, multi-stalked
Sun, part sun
Prefers wetter sites
White flower clusters-
conical
Red berri...
Native to Coastal Oregon
Tall vigorous shrub to 8 or
more feet can be pruned
for height and size
Deciduous
Attractive ...
Blooms in spring
Shade/part-sun,
banks and drier areas
A stunning coastal
native evergreen
Blooms late
spring/sumer
Prefers full sun
Deciduous
Flowers are
bee favorites
Many selected
forms available
Blooms Feb/Mar
Shade/part-sun,
banks and drier
areas
Fast growing,
readily available
Drupes in late
summer for birds
...
Occurs naturally along
streams but tolerates
drier conditions
Full to part sun
Red winter twigs
Host for native
butter...
Native to Coastal
Oregon
Stately and large
evergreen shrub with
grayish-green leaves
Pendant flowers in
February
Common in Coastal
Oregon
Evergreen shrub
sometimes used as a
tall ground cover 3-5
ft
Host to native
butteflies
• Mid height to 15 ft.,
especially tall at the
coast
• A favorite native
evergreen shrub,
cultivars available
• Fruits are...
Spreads to
stabilize banks
Spreads to
increase cover
Bluish, soft foliage
Fruits provide
food through the
winter
Garden interest up
close
Protection for
compaction by rain
Hiding places for small
creatures
Help prevent erosion
Lady...
Part or full shade
One of the best
plants for bank
stabilization
Great landscape
ornamental
Easy to find
Easy to tran...
Ground cover,
spreading by
runners
Some species
prefer shade;
others sun
Nectar for
butterflies and
other insects
Butt...
Native to the Oregon
Coast
Prefers full sun but can
take part-shade
Berries not palatable
although it is one of the
par...
Unfurling spring fronds
Prefers sun or part
sun, good soil
moisture
Good for bank
stabilization
Winter deciduous
Delic...
Aggressive groundcover
Full to part shade
Once established,
difficult to remove
Prefers moist shade
Pink-flowered for...
Reliable native iris,
late spring blooms
Tolerates drier sites
Natural distribution
includes Oregon coast
Native to Coastal
Oregon and flourishes
there
Beautiful groundcover
for shade
Excellent hiding places
for small creatur...
Moist soil
Sun/part-shade
Spreads to
become a ground
cover
Nectar
Seeds provide
food for wildlife
Native to Coastal
Oregon
Forms small clumps
Seems to prefer well
drained soils
Many cultivars are
also available
Native to the Oregon Coast
Look for native forms of
this widespread species,
‘Vancouver Jade’ is a West
Coast selection
...
Local nurseries - ask if you are unsure –
Let’s make a list now to share
with each other
Native Plant Sales, such as tho...
Make a plan to incorporate native plants in
your own garden.
Draw a picture or make a list of goals. List at
least 3 goa...
Photos by the author
unless noted
Presentation may be
used freely for
educational purposes
For all other purposes,
cont...
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates
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Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates

As native plant gardening becomes more popular, gardeners wish to learn which native plants will work for their area. This presentation is for coastal Oregon but is relevant to many places on the Western coast of North America
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Native plants for oregon’s coastal climates

  • 1. Linda R McMahan, Ph.D. Associate Professor Emeritus, Department of Horticulture Oregon State University linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu Nutka rose Maianthemum dilitatum
  • 2. Why native plants? The most reliable species Different plants for different purposes Which species attract the wildlife you want to encourage and enjoy What We Will Cover Today Wood sorrel
  • 3. Learn about some trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants and groundcovers native to coastal Oregon or nearby areas Learn where to purchase them Make a plan to incorporate native plants into your own landscape If something interests you during the presentation, write it down—taking notes will help you remember what you liked
  • 4. Natives add or enhance wildlife habitat Look at all levels-trees shrubs, herbaceous plants and groundcovers Match the requirements of the plant to its new habitat Plant directly into native soil Wild bleeding heart, Dicentra formosa
  • 5. Take care of plants for the first 2-5 years after planting—some will require additional irrigation during this time Group plants with similar needs together Enjoy your connection with Oregon native plants Piggy-back plant, Tolmiea menziesii
  • 6. Native Plants are: Already adapted to our weather and soils Reminders of our natural surroundings Support for local insects, birds and other wildlife Beneficial for stream health Hardy and relatively disease free Beautiful Why Native Plants Western mock orange, Philadelphus lewisii
  • 7. Housed at Oregon State University, this searchable site has distribution information, printable maps, and photographs. It is a non-profit organization. http://www.oregonflora.org
  • 8. This site provides correct and current scientific names, generates printable maps of plant distribution This is the reference page for the Golden current, Ribes aureum, var. aureum, native to Oregon’s east side. www.oregonflora.org
  • 9. • Structure • Shade • Protection • Vertical Interest Trees in the Landscape Provide: Grand fir, Abies grandis and western red cedar, Thuja plicata
  • 10. A shorter relative of the lodgepole pine but with highly different characteristics – lower stature and wetter habitat Native to the Oregon Coast Evergreen with colorful winter cones Cultivars, including dwarf forms, are available
  • 11. Stately tree Use large leaves for weed suppression or compost Once established requires no added water, but can support a shady lawn
  • 12. Bigleaf maple
  • 13. Grows near but not in water Sun, part sun Mature tree can be very tall
  • 14. Native to the Pacific Coast Evergreen Supports bird life Sun, part sun Mature tree can be very tall http://oregonstate.edu/trees/conifer_g from OSU Common trees of the Northwest
  • 15. machine-readable source provided. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/ index.php?curid=524751 By Alexander Karnstedt (Alexrk2) - Eigenes Werk (own work), SRTM30 V2, National Atlas of the United States, CC BY- SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.ph p?curid=7579471
  • 16. Graceful understory tree, prefers part shade where it “twines” Slow growing Readily available
  • 17. • Light shade • Drier areas • March blooms • “Plums” bird food • Easy to grow
  • 18. • Shelter • Erosion Control • Wildlife Value • Eye Level Interest • Garden “structure” Shrubs in the Landscape Provide: Red flowering currant, Ribes sanguineum
  • 19. Mock orange – Philadelphus lewisii • Fragrant, • Good nectar source • Fast grower, • Drought tolerant • Sun, part shade • Butterfly host
  • 20. Mock Orange
  • 21. Full sun in drier areas Bank stabilizer, spreads underground Flowers provide nectar, hips are food for wildlife Host for native butterflies
  • 22. Evergreen, forms colonies Berries and nectar support wildlife State flower of Oregon Widely available
  • 23. Native to coastal climates, multi-stalked Sun, part sun Prefers wetter sites White flower clusters- conical Red berries support wildlife
  • 24. Native to Coastal Oregon Tall vigorous shrub to 8 or more feet can be pruned for height and size Deciduous Attractive flowers and berries in pairs, berries ripen in July Flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies
  • 25. Blooms in spring Shade/part-sun, banks and drier areas A stunning coastal native evergreen
  • 26. Blooms late spring/sumer Prefers full sun Deciduous Flowers are bee favorites Many selected forms available
  • 27. Blooms Feb/Mar Shade/part-sun, banks and drier areas Fast growing, readily available Drupes in late summer for birds Hummingbird pollinated
  • 28. Occurs naturally along streams but tolerates drier conditions Full to part sun Red winter twigs Host for native butterflies Look for local plant types of this widespread species
  • 29. Native to Coastal Oregon Stately and large evergreen shrub with grayish-green leaves Pendant flowers in February
  • 30. Common in Coastal Oregon Evergreen shrub sometimes used as a tall ground cover 3-5 ft Host to native butteflies
  • 31. • Mid height to 15 ft., especially tall at the coast • A favorite native evergreen shrub, cultivars available • Fruits are edible • Host to native butterflies
  • 32. Spreads to stabilize banks Spreads to increase cover Bluish, soft foliage Fruits provide food through the winter
  • 33. Garden interest up close Protection for compaction by rain Hiding places for small creatures Help prevent erosion Ladyfern and oxalis
  • 34. Part or full shade One of the best plants for bank stabilization Great landscape ornamental Easy to find Easy to transplant and relocate
  • 35. Ground cover, spreading by runners Some species prefer shade; others sun Nectar for butterflies and other insects Butterfly caterpillar hosts Fragaria chiloense
  • 36. Native to the Oregon Coast Prefers full sun but can take part-shade Berries not palatable although it is one of the parents of commercial strawberries Spreads by runners
  • 37. Unfurling spring fronds Prefers sun or part sun, good soil moisture Good for bank stabilization Winter deciduous Delicate soft foliage 2-4 feet tall or more
  • 38. Aggressive groundcover Full to part shade Once established, difficult to remove Prefers moist shade Pink-flowered form, sometimes called redwood sorrel, is less aggressive and native to the southern coast
  • 39. Reliable native iris, late spring blooms Tolerates drier sites Natural distribution includes Oregon coast
  • 40. Native to Coastal Oregon and flourishes there Beautiful groundcover for shade Excellent hiding places for small creatures
  • 41. Moist soil Sun/part-shade Spreads to become a ground cover Nectar Seeds provide food for wildlife
  • 42. Native to Coastal Oregon Forms small clumps Seems to prefer well drained soils Many cultivars are also available
  • 43. Native to the Oregon Coast Look for native forms of this widespread species, ‘Vancouver Jade’ is a West Coast selection Deer resistant, evergreen groundcover Host to native butterflies
  • 44. Local nurseries - ask if you are unsure – Let’s make a list now to share with each other Native Plant Sales, such as those often sponsored by Soil and Water Conservation Districts or plant societies Larger plant sales such as that sponsored by the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon or the Leach Botanical Garden (Portland) Online – but look for local forms if possible
  • 45. Make a plan to incorporate native plants in your own garden. Draw a picture or make a list of goals. List at least 3 goals. Pick 8-10 native plants plants that are of interest to you. For each kind of plant, describe how you will use it in your garden. For each plant, describe a conservation or wildlife value.
  • 46. Photos by the author unless noted Presentation may be used freely for educational purposes For all other purposes, contact the author at linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu Stream violet, Viola glabella