Native Bees in the Willamette Valley<br />© Jen Bergh 2011<br />
PNW Native Bees<br />Estimated 879 species in 5 families<br /><ul><li>Andrenidae – mining bees
Colletidae – plasterer bees
Halictidae – sweat bees
Megachilidae – leaf cutter bees
Apidae – bumblebees, sunflower bees</li></ul>Solitary to social<br />Specialist and generalist feeders<br />Pollinate crop...
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Native pollinators

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Self Improvement      Technology      
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Transcripts - Native pollinators

  • 1. Native Bees in the Willamette Valley<br />© Jen Bergh 2011<br />
  • 2. PNW Native Bees<br />Estimated 879 species in 5 families<br /><ul><li>Andrenidae – mining bees
  • 3. Colletidae – plasterer bees
  • 4. Halictidae – sweat bees
  • 5. Megachilidae – leaf cutter bees
  • 6. Apidae – bumblebees, sunflower bees</li></ul>Solitary to social<br />Specialist and generalist feeders<br />Pollinate crops and native plants<br />[1]Michener CD. 2007. [2] Stephen WP. 1969. [13]Danforthet al. 2006.<br />
  • 7. Bumble Bees<br />11+ species of Bumble Bee in the Willamette Valley<br />Social bees<br />Colonies with 1 queen and many workers<br />Nest in rodent burrows, soil, bird houses, homes<br />Generalist feeders<br />Economically important pollinators<br /><ul><li> Blueberries
  • 8. Red clover</li></ul>Bombus vosnesenskii <br />Bombus mixtus females<br />Queen<br />Workers<br />[1]Michener CD. 2007. [2] Stephen WP. 1969.<br />
  • 9. Solitary Bees<br />Soil and stem nesters, generalist & specialist feeders, important pollinators of native plants<br />Digger Bees<br />Long-horned Bees<br />Sunflower Bees<br />Mason Bees<br />Small Carpenter Bees<br />Sweat Bees<br />Leafcutter Bees<br />[15] Photo: Aaron Schusteff, USFWS, NPS, Sankax, Erik Blosser.<br />
  • 10. Preserving Native Bee Populations<br />Native bees provide the ecosystem services of pollination<br />Bees need:<br /><ul><li> Flowering plants for pollen, nectar, and plant resin resources
  • 11. Sequential bloom of favored plants: February to October
  • 12. Nesting habitat</li></ul>Ideas to help sustain and enhance local bee communities:<br /><ul><li> Plant bee friendly, long blooming plants
  • 13. Leave patches of bare ground in your garden
  • 14. Leave the weeds: clover, dandelion, English daisy, yarrow, thistle
  • 15. Preserve any nests you discover: compost piles, dead wood, dried out plant material
  • 16. Apply chemicals at night</li></li></ul><li>Plants for Bees<br />A new resource under development<br />Jen Bergh and Sujaya Rao<br />Department of Crop and Soil Science, Oregon State University<br />The Pacific Northwest Bee Plants Online Database<br />Goal: Describe plants and propose landscape schemes that provide season-long floral resources<br />Target Users: gardeners, commercial growers, landscape professionals, and land managers<br />Features: Searchable database with hundreds of forbs, natives and cultivated plant species<br />Filter searches to specific goals:<br /> Plants by color, size or other characteristic (eg., annual, perennial, native, cultivated)<br /> Plants by landscape style (eg., meadow, native, woodland, cottage garden, Mediterranean, xeric)<br /> Plants by water requirements<br /> ….and more!<br />For more information or to be notified when the database is available: jennifer.bergh@oregonstate.edu or sujaya@oregonstate.edu<br />© Jen Bergh 2011<br />

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