STANDARDS for 7-12 SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS–BIOLOGY
24:16:08:16 (1a-b)
102 110 120 121 150 180 225 ...
courses include: introduction to environmental science, principles of ecology, aquatic ecology, and
environmental physiolo...
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narrativebiology.doc

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  • 1. STANDARDS for 7-12 SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS–BIOLOGY 24:16:08:16 (1a-b) 102 110 120 121 150 180 225 233 234 250 334 336 342 344 346 348 350 354 356 358 1a1 X X X X X X X X 1a2 X X X X X X X X X 1a3 X X X X X X X X 1a4 X X X X X X 1a5 X X X X X X 1b1 X X X X X X X X X X X X 1b2 X X X X X X X X X X X X 1b3 X X X X X X X X X In constructing the grid, standards were subdivided to more accurately reflect the variety of courses available to students. Subcategories of standards: 1a1–relationship of species; classification of plants, animals, fungi, protista, and monera 1a2–ecology 1a3–morphology; anatomy, development 1a4–genetics 1a5–physiology 1b1–structure and function of organisms; molecular and subcellular 1b2–structure and function of organisms; cellular 1b3–structure and function of organisms; organ system 24:16:08:16.__7-12 science education program. A 7-12 science education program shall comply with all standards in general education, professional education, and 7-12 secondary education program requirements, and require coursework sufficient to constitute a major in one of the specific content areas listed below, with at least 50 percent in upper division coursework. In addition, each 7-12 science education program shall require study in the processes by which science produces new knowledge and the nature of that knowledge, study in the history and philosophy of the particular science and the interrelationships among sciences, and study in health and safety procedures and conditions in science classrooms and laboratories. Coursework requirements include: 24:16:08:16 (1a-b) Biology Program Coursework shall include a systematic, quantitative, and qualitative study of the fundamentals of biology content, to include the study of: (a)The relationship of species, ecology, morphology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, development and classification of plants, animals, fungi, protista and monera; and Students work with all types of organisms in their courses. Within the two introductory courses, for example, experiments range from recombinant DNA techniques with microbes through behavior of sow bugs, heart rates and temperature in Daphnia, fertilization and development in sea urchins, physiology of C3 and C4 grasses, to experiments with their own biological rhythms. Courses dealing with the subcellular and cellular levels include biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, microbiology, and molecular genetics, and biotechnology. Courses at the organismic level include human physiology, vertebrate structure and development, developmental biology, plant function and structure, and environmental physiology. Whole organisms courses include ornithology and invertebrate zoology. One series of courses within our curriculum includes those which devote their main thrust to the interrelationships among organisms and between organisms and their physical environment. Such
  • 2. courses include: introduction to environmental science, principles of ecology, aquatic ecology, and environmental physiology. However, the relationships between organisms and their environment constitute an underlying theme that is found in all biology courses. In addition, the catalogue descriptions and syllabi of every course except Biological Chemistry (Biol 354) comment on these standards when appropriate. (b)Structure and function of organisms at all levels of complexity from the molecular to the organ system; Although most of our courses have some emphasis in this area, naturally some courses focus more directly on these aspects. Catalogue descriptions and syllabi for the following courses comment on these standards: 110,120,121,150,225,234,342,346,356, and 358. Students work with all types of organisms in their courses. Within the two introductory courses, for example, experiments range from recombinant DNA techniques with microbes through behavior of sow bugs, heart rates and temperature in Daphnia, fertilization and development in sea urchins, physiology of C3 and C4 grasses, to experiments with their own biological rhythms. Courses dealing with the subcellular and cellular levels include biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, microbiology, and molecular genetics, and biotechnology. Courses at the organismic level include human physiology, vertebrate structure and development, developmental biology, plant function and structure, and environmental physiology. Whole organisms courses include ornithology and invertebrate zoology. Source: 24 SDR 160, adopted May 28, 1998, effective September 1, 2000. General Authority: SDCL 13-1-12.1, 13-42-3. Law Implemented: SDCL 13-42-3, 13-42-4.

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