The Politics of School ChoiceInternational Academic Conference onSchool Choice and Education ReformJanuary 18, 2013Ft. Lau...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgQuestions• How popular or unpopular are private s...
National Surveys onSchool Choice TopicsThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgPDK/Gallup (1970 to 2012)Public Support for Vouchers
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgTerry Moe (1995/2001)• Low awareness and informat...
The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgEdNext-PEPG/KN (2007 to 2012)Public Support for Low-Income Vo...
edchoice.org
Wording considerations…The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgMoe’s recommendations for item construction (p. 2...
A school voucher system allows parentsthe option of sending their child to theschool of their choice, whether thatschool i...
Wording experiment…“school vouchers” or“opportunity scholarships”The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice...
edchoice.org
edchoice.org
DemographicSnapshotsThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
edchoice.org
edchoice.org
edchoice.org
edchoice.org
edchoice.org
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgStateSnapshots(2010 to 2012)
The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
What do voters sayabout school vouchers?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
School Vouchers, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Mississippi 74 20 + 54 + 33 603 Ju...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgTakeaways• Pluralities and majorities support vou...
Thank YouQuestions, Comments, or Suggestions?Contact: Paul DiPerna, paul@edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Education...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
How much do voters know aboutcharter schools and vouchers?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
Familiarity with Charter Schools and VouchersBy State SurveyCharter Schools School Vouchers% Familiar % FamiliarAlabama 31...
What do voters sayabout charter schools?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
Charter Schools, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Alaska 72 11 + 61 + 30 490 Sep/112...
What type of school isfirst preference?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
School Type PreferencesBy State SurveyRegularPublic SchoolAlabama 38 40 8 11 601 Jul/10Alaska 39 30 15 11 1,006 Sep/11Arka...
What do voters sayabout tax-credit scholarships?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
Tax-Credit Scholarships, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 New York 70 22 + 48 + 23 6...
What do voters say abouteducation savings accounts?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
Education Savings Accounts (ESAs), Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Alaska 61 27 + 3...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhy do we conduct polls and surveys?• state views...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgConsidering…~ Levels~ Differences/Gaps/Spread/Net...
NOTE: "Familiar" values based on combining "Very"and "Somewhat" familiar responses. This chart issuggestive for making rel...
NOTE: The previous chart is suggestive for makingrelative comparisons. Several factors may contribute toresponse variation...
NOTE: "Favor" and "Oppose" values based on combining"Strongly" and "Somewhat" responses. This chart is suggestivefor makin...
Survey Organization: Braun Research, Inc. (BRI)Sponsor: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceInterview Dates: 2010 to...
edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgAbout the Friedman Foundation• Established in 199...
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Polling Together (2013) - Slides

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: News & Politics      Economy & Finance      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Polling Together (2013) - Slides

  • 1. The Politics of School ChoiceInternational Academic Conference onSchool Choice and Education ReformJanuary 18, 2013Ft. Lauderdale, FLPaul DiPernaFriedman Foundation for Educational Choicepaul@edchoice.orgPolling Together
  • 2. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgQuestions• How popular or unpopular are private schoolvouchers (in general) in the U.S.?• What role does question wording play in publicsupport of private school choice? How do you wordthe voucher question in your surveys and why doyou employ that particular wording?• Is the term “opportunity scholarships” more popularthan calling them “school vouchers”?• Wrt demographics and states, what does the rangeof support/opposition look like for vouchers?
  • 3. National Surveys onSchool Choice TopicsThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 4. The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgPDK/Gallup (1970 to 2012)Public Support for Vouchers
  • 5. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgTerry Moe (1995/2001)• Low awareness and information ( ~ 2:1)• National, 60% vs. 32% = + 28• Parents, 68% vs. 24% = + 44• African Americans, 73% vs. 18% = + 55• Latinos, 71% vs. 18% = + 53Public Agenda (1999)• National, 57% vs. 36% = + 21Intensity = 29% vs. 23% = + 6• Parents, 68% vs. 27% = + 41Intensity = 40% vs. 17% = + 23
  • 6. The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgEdNext-PEPG/KN (2007 to 2012)Public Support for Low-Income Vouchers
  • 7. edchoice.org
  • 8. Wording considerations…The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 9. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgMoe’s recommendations for item construction (p. 200)• vouchers would be available to parents generally,not just to existing private school parents• vouchers would enable parents to choose amongpublic, parochial, and private options in decidingwhere their children go to school• vouchers would be financed by the governmentand thus paid for out of taxes
  • 10. A school voucher system allows parentsthe option of sending their child to theschool of their choice, whether thatschool is public or private, includingboth religious and non-religious schools.If this policy were adopted, tax dollarscurrently allocated to a school districtwould be allocated to parents in theform of a “school voucher” to pay partialor full tuition for their child’s school. Ingeneral, do you favor or oppose aschool voucher system?
  • 11. Wording experiment…“school vouchers” or“opportunity scholarships”The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 12. edchoice.org
  • 13. edchoice.org
  • 14. DemographicSnapshotsThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 15. edchoice.org
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  • 18. edchoice.org
  • 19. edchoice.org
  • 20. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgStateSnapshots(2010 to 2012)
  • 21. The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 22. What do voters sayabout school vouchers?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 23. School Vouchers, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Mississippi 74 20 + 54 + 33 603 Jul/102 New Jersey 69 26 + 43 + 20 602 Jul/103 Indiana 66 25 + 41 + 24 1,017 Nov/104 New York 66 26 + 40 + 26 603 Jul/105 Alaska 64 29 + 35 + 16 1,006 Sep/116 Louisiana 63 29 + 34 + 21 802 Feb/127 Alabama 62 28 + 34 + 16 601 Jul/108 New Mexico 62 31 + 31 + 15 808 Sep/119 Arkansas 60 30 + 30 + 21 603 Jul/1010 Tennessee 59 31 + 28 + 11 606 Feb/1211 North Carolina 57 32 + 25 + 14 601 Jun/1212 Kansas 57 36 + 21 + 14 602 Jul/1013 Idaho 56 35 + 21 + 9 1,202 Nov/1114 Washington 55 35 + 20 + 4 602 Feb/1215 Montana 52 39 + 13 + 4 604 Apr/12Mo/YrIntensitySOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceState Net N=
  • 24. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgTakeaways• Pluralities and majorities support vouchers.… especially among Parents, African Americans,Latinos; 18-29/30-54 groups; urban and ruralareas; Republicans; (and so far in) MS, NJ, IN, NY.• Decisions on core concepts and definition are key forvoucher item construction… as much as specific choiceof words… We define universal vouchers per Friedman(1955) and per Moe’s recommendations (2001).• In controlled context (survey), “opportunityscholarships” garner more support/less resistance than“school vouchers”… but political arena requiresdefining the terms clearly and linking early as possible.
  • 25. Thank YouQuestions, Comments, or Suggestions?Contact: Paul DiPerna, paul@edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 26. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 27. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 28. How much do voters know aboutcharter schools and vouchers?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 29. Familiarity with Charter Schools and VouchersBy State SurveyCharter Schools School Vouchers% Familiar % FamiliarAlabama 31 33 601 Jul/10Alaska 52 38 1,006 Sep/11Arkansas 37 41 603 Jul/10Idaho 57 32 1,202 Nov/11Indiana 29 32 1,017 Nov/10Kansas 39 43 602 Jul/10Louisiana 37 38 802 Feb/12Mississippi 31 41 603 Jul/10Montana 30 37 604 Apr/12New Jersey 54 50 602 Jul/10New Mexico 44 40 808 Sep/11New York 53 42 603 Jul/10North Carolina 46 36 601 Jun/12Tennessee 33 38 606 Feb/12Washington 46 35 602 Feb/12State N= Mo/YrSOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice
  • 30. What do voters sayabout charter schools?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 31. Charter Schools, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Alaska 72 11 + 61 + 30 490 Sep/112 New Mexico 72 18 + 54 + 23 808 Sep/113 Idaho 69 17 + 52 + 25 1,202 Nov/114 New Jersey 70 19 + 51 + 19 602 Jul/105 North Carolina 65 15 + 50 + 24 601 Jun/126 Indiana 66 17 + 49 + 20 1,017 Nov/107 New York 68 20 + 48 + 25 603 Jul/108 Tennessee 61 18 + 43 + 14 606 Feb/129 Kansas 62 20 + 42 + 19 602 Jul/1010 Mississippi 62 20 + 42 + 16 603 Jul/1011 Louisiana 61 22 + 39 + 19 802 Feb/1212 Arkansas 60 23 + 37 + 16 603 Jul/1013 Washington 60 23 + 37 + 14 602 Feb/1214 Alabama 58 21 + 37 + 14 601 Jul/1015 Montana 54 21 + 33 +11 604 Apr/12Mo/YrIntensitySOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceState Net N=
  • 32. What type of school isfirst preference?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 33. School Type PreferencesBy State SurveyRegularPublic SchoolAlabama 38 40 8 11 601 Jul/10Alaska 39 30 15 11 1,006 Sep/11Arkansas 37 33 12 14 603 Jul/10Idaho 38 27 22 8 1,202 Nov/11Indiana 38 41 10 7 1,017 Nov/10Kansas 40 35 13 9 602 Jul/10Louisiana 31 49 10 8 802 Feb/12Mississippi 43 38 8 10 603 Jul/10Montana 50 28 9 10 604 Apr/12New Jersey 40 39 12 7 602 Jul/10New Mexico 37 36 15 9 808 Sep/11New York 29 49 14 7 603 Jul/10North Carolina 34 39 15 11 601 Jun/12Tennessee 40 40 9 8 606 Feb/12Washington 40 35 14 7 602 Feb/12SOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceState N= Mo/YrPrivate School Charter School Homeschool
  • 34. What do voters sayabout tax-credit scholarships?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 35. Tax-Credit Scholarships, Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 New York 70 22 + 48 + 23 603 Jul/102 New Jersey 69 23 + 46 + 22 602 Jul/103 Alaska 64 18 + 46 + 24 490 Sep/114 Arkansas 65 24 + 41 + 22 603 Jul/105 Mississippi 65 24 + 41 + 20 603 Jul/106 Indiana 63 22 + 41 + 15 1,017 Nov/107 Idaho 60 21 + 39 + 13 1,202 Nov/118 North Carolina 63 25 + 38 + 12 302 Jun/129 New Mexico 62 26 + 36 + 8 388 Sep/1110 Alabama 60 25 + 35 + 15 601 Jul/1011 Tennessee 61 26 + 35 + 14 303 Feb/1212 Washington 59 25 + 34 + 10 301 Feb/1213 Montana 59 28 + 31 + 13 302 Apr/1214 Kansas 56 29 + 27 + 11 602 Jul/10Mo/YrIntensitySOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceState Net N=
  • 36. What do voters say abouteducation savings accounts?The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 37. Education Savings Accounts (ESAs), Favor vs. OpposeState Rankings By Net ScoreState Favor OpposeRank % %1 Alaska 61 27 + 34 + 18 1,006 Sep/112 North Carolina 56 28 + 28 + 18 302 Jun/123 Washington 57 31 + 26 + 7 602 Feb/124 Tennessee 56 31 + 25 + 12 606 Feb/125 Montana 55 31 + 24 + 7 604 Apr/126 New Mexico 57 35 + 22 + 10 808 Sep/117 Idaho 53 32 + 21 + 4 1,202 Nov/11Mo/YrSOURCE: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceState Net Intensity N=
  • 38. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgWhy do we conduct polls and surveys?• state views/education culture• assessment/comparison of states• national change over time• seek diverse perspectives• launch/frame policy conversations
  • 39. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgConsidering…~ Levels~ Differences/Gaps/Spread/Net(Favor – Oppose)~ Intensities(Strong Favor – Strong Oppose)
  • 40. NOTE: "Familiar" values based on combining "Very"and "Somewhat" familiar responses. This chart issuggestive for making relative comparisons. Severalfactors may contribute to response variation on thesame questions: state surveys have been administeredin different time periods; sample sizes vary, producingdifferent margins of error; survey questionnairesslightly vary on question quantity and questionordering. We use a Registered Voters (RV) sampleframe for each state survey.The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 41. NOTE: The previous chart is suggestive for makingrelative comparisons. Several factors may contribute toresponse variation on the same questions: state surveyshave been administered in different time periods; samplesizes vary, producing different margins of error; surveyquestionnaires slightly vary on question quantity andquestion ordering. We use a Registered Voters (RV)sample frame for each state survey.The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 42. NOTE: "Favor" and "Oppose" values based on combining"Strongly" and "Somewhat" responses. This chart is suggestivefor making relative comparisons. Several factors may contributeto response variation on the same questions: state surveys havebeen administered in different time periods; sample sizes vary,producing different margins of error; survey questionnairesslightly vary on question quantity and question ordering. We usea Registered Voters (RV) sample frame for each state survey.Intensity is measured by subtracting the percentage of "stronglyoppose" responses from the percentage of "strongly favor"responses. The difference indicates how passionate the supportor opposition is for a given policy or proposal. If two or morestates have the same Net value, then the Intensity value is tie-breaker #1. If still a tie, then Favor value is tie-breaker #2.The Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.org
  • 43. Survey Organization: Braun Research, Inc. (BRI)Sponsor: Friedman Foundation for Educational ChoiceInterview Dates: 2010 to 2012 (field dates vary by state)Interview Method: Live Telephone(landline-to-cell phone ratio varies by state)Avg Interview Length: 12 minutesLanguage(s): English, Spanish (in select states)Sample Frame: Registered VotersSampling Method: Probability Sampling; Random Digit Dial (RDD)Dual FrameSample Size: Varies by StateMargin of Error: Varies by StateWeighting? Yes (demographic weights vary by state)
  • 44. edchoice.orgThe Friedman Foundation For Educational Choice | edchoice.orgAbout the Friedman Foundation• Established in 1996• Headquarters in Indianapolis, IN• 501(c)(3) / Nonpartisan / Nonprofit• What do we do?Working with local and state partners,we are committed to research,education, and outreachon the vital issues and implicationsrelated to choice and competitionin K-12 education.

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