Nanomaterials in Ecosystems: Should we worry? Dr. Emily Bernhardt Assistant Professor of Biology at Duke University Tonig...
“ But I am not afraid to consider the final question as to whether, ultimately---in the great future---we can arrange the ...
What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a charac...
What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a charac...
Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature Geobacter sulfurreducens expressing pilli Nanoparticulate Iron oxides in Washingto...
Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature
 
What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a charac...
 
What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a charac...
Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles Carbon Nanotubes Quantum Dots
Nanomaterials are ubiquitous in nature Manufactured Iron oxide nanoparticles Carbon nanotube “superthread” ZnO nanowires G...
# of consumer products containing NPs From the Project on Emerging Technologies
Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
How can we provide accurate predictions of the fate and impact of novel compounds in natural environments?
 
 
Sondi & Sulapek-Sondi 2004
<ul><li>E. coli ≠ Ecosystem </li></ul>
<ul><li>How can Nanoscale materials have ecosystem scale effects? </li></ul><ul><li>1. Through direct effects on microbes,...
Nanosilver effects on streamwater microbes Work by Ben Colman
Effect of nanosilver on Lolium multiflorum Work by Liyan Yin
Gold (Au) Nanoparticles in foodwebs Images from Jason Unrine, Lee Newman and Paul Bertsch (CEINT, University of Kentucky)...
Test Tube ≠ Ecosystem
Biosolid + Ag nano application to field wetland microcosms
 
Biosolid + Ag nano application to field wetland microcosms Prototype slantboard wetland mesocosm With real time environm...
Q: How should nanomaterials be regulated to maximize potential while minimizing unintended consequences? Q&A Fan us on F...
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Nanomaterials in the Ecosystem: Should we worry?

Nanotechnology has the enormous potential to change our society. New advances in medicine, energy production, environmental cleanup and better access to clean water are just a few of the many possibilities. According to the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, the number of products that use nanomaterials has increased almost 380% since 2006. But, is it the same special properties that make nanoscale materials so useful that also pose potential risks to humans and the environment? Dr. Emily Bernhardt from the Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology discussed with us the fate of nanomaterials in our environment and why you should care.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nanomaterials in the Ecosystem: Should we worry?

  • 1. Nanomaterials in Ecosystems: Should we worry? Dr. Emily Bernhardt Assistant Professor of Biology at Duke University Tonight! @ 7pm Cold beer. Hot food. Cool Science. Fan us on Facebook
  • 2. “ But I am not afraid to consider the final question as to whether, ultimately---in the great future---we can arrange the atoms the way we want; the very atoms, all the way down! What would happen if we could arrange the atoms one by one the way we want them? … Up to now, we have been content to dig in the ground to find minerals.… we must always accept some atomic arrangement that nature gives us. … What would the properties of materials be if we could really arrange the atoms the way we want them? Physicist Richard Feynman “ There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” December 1959
  • 3. What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a characteristic dimension from 1 to 100 nm and has properties that are not shared by non-nanoscale particles with the same chemical composition.
  • 4. What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a characteristic dimension from 1 to 100 nm and has properties that are not shared by non-nanoscale particles with the same chemical composition.
  • 5. Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature Geobacter sulfurreducens expressing pilli Nanoparticulate Iron oxides in Washington, D.C. drinking water Cellulose nanofibrils in maize (2x2μm) Organisms have evolved in systems full of nanomaterials…
  • 6. Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature
  • 8. What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a characteristic dimension from 1 to 100 nm and has properties that are not shared by non-nanoscale particles with the same chemical composition.
  • 10. What is a nanoparticle? An engineered nanoparticle may be defined as any intentionally produced particle that has a characteristic dimension from 1 to 100 nm and has properties that are not shared by non-nanoscale particles with the same chemical composition.
  • 11. Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles Carbon Nanotubes Quantum Dots
  • 12. Nanomaterials are ubiquitous in nature Manufactured Iron oxide nanoparticles Carbon nanotube “superthread” ZnO nanowires Geobacter sulfurreducens expressing pilli Nanoparticulate Iron oxides in Washington, D.C. drinking water Cellulose nanofibrils in maize (2x2μm)
  • 13. # of consumer products containing NPs From the Project on Emerging Technologies
  • 14. Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
  • 15. Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
  • 16. Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
  • 17. Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
  • 18. Nanomaterials, good for the environment?
  • 19. How can we provide accurate predictions of the fate and impact of novel compounds in natural environments?
  • 22. Sondi & Sulapek-Sondi 2004
  • 23. <ul><li>E. coli ≠ Ecosystem </li></ul>
  • 24. <ul><li>How can Nanoscale materials have ecosystem scale effects? </li></ul><ul><li>1. Through direct effects on microbes, algae or plants </li></ul><ul><li>2. Through transmission & biomagnification of nanoparticles through food webs </li></ul>
  • 25. Nanosilver effects on streamwater microbes Work by Ben Colman
  • 26. Effect of nanosilver on Lolium multiflorum Work by Liyan Yin
  • 27. Gold (Au) Nanoparticles in foodwebs Images from Jason Unrine, Lee Newman and Paul Bertsch (CEINT, University of Kentucky) Control Exposed (3.5 nm Au) New evidence for trophic transfer & bioaccumulation in tobacco hornworms
  • 28. Test Tube ≠ Ecosystem
  • 29. Biosolid + Ag nano application to field wetland microcosms
  • 31. Biosolid + Ag nano application to field wetland microcosms Prototype slantboard wetland mesocosm With real time environmental monitoring
  • 32. Q: How should nanomaterials be regulated to maximize potential while minimizing unintended consequences? Q&A Fan us on Facebook Cold beer. Hot food. Cool Science.

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