GEOGRAPHY, Libya Date Posted: 1...
Coastline TOPThe Mediterranean coastline stretches for 1,770 km and consists mostly of sandy beachesbacked by flat land, e...
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Libya - Geography 2006

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Transcripts - Libya - Geography 2006

  • 1. GEOGRAPHY, Libya Date Posted: 16-Mar-2005 Janes Sentinel Security Assessment - North Africa GEOGRAPHYPHYSICAL SUMMARY TOPAREA1,759,540 km2 LOCATION20-33 North10-25 East ELEVATIONBelow sea level to 2,287 m ZONEDesertGeneral Overview TOPLibya is the fourth largest country in Africa and is roughly three times the size of France.Much of the country is relatively flat and low-lying, most noticeably so in coastal and easternregions, but isolated escarpments are a feature of the landscape. These reach to over 1,000 min at least four regions. The main feature in the north is the Jebel Akhdar (Green Mountain)range, which rises over 800 m near the coast just east of Benghazi and constitutes thecountrys only woodland zone. Coastal regions are steppe, the temperate climate allowinglimited soil cultivation in a few areas east and west of the Bay of Sirte. Except for oases, mostof the rest of the country is arid and barren.Environmental Factors TOPEnvironmental problems in Libya include desertification and limited natural fresh waterresources. The Great Man-made River Project, the largest water development scheme in theworld, is being built to bring water from large aquifers under the Sahara to coastal cities.There is serious concern among environmentalists who believe this will permanently disruptthe underground flow of water from the Atlas Mountains to the oases of Egypt. It is alsoreported that the project loses an enormous amount of water in the piping process through thedesert.Rivers TOPFew rivers can flow in Libyas desert climate. The country has only one permanently flowingriver, the Wadi Kiam, and this is a mere 2 km long. This creates water supply problems forboth irrigation and domestic consumption. The Great Man-made River Project, the worldslargest water development scheme, is attempting to increase water supply in coastal cities bytapping large aquifers in the Sahara.This page was saved from http://search.janes.com Did you know Janes Strategic Advisory Services can provide impartial, thoroughly researched market evaluation, providing© Janes Information Group, All rights reserved you with the same reliable insight you expect to find in our publications and online services?
  • 2. Coastline TOPThe Mediterranean coastline stretches for 1,770 km and consists mostly of sandy beachesbacked by flat land, except in the east where the Jebel Akhdar is close to the shore. Most ofthe beaches enjoy obstruction-free approaches with, for the most part, gentle gradients andfew offshore obstructions, apart from the southeast of the Gulf of Sirte. CLIMATIC SUMMARY TOPAVERAGE ANNUAL TEMPERATURE24C max; 15C min (coast) AVERAGE ANNUAL RAINFALL270 mm (Benghazi)380 mm (Tripoli) AVERAGE RELATIVE HUMIDITY60 per cent (coast)· Temperatures in the desert interior are generally much hotter (and colder at night) and drier than on the coast. General Overview TOPClimatic conditions in Libya are very similar to those that prevail in neighbouring Egypt. Theweather of the Mediterranean littoral and more central and southern regions differs widely -the climate of the former is temperate, the latter is desert. The wettest area of the country isfound around the Jebel Akhdar, - average annual rainfall here is as much as 600 mm. The restof the coast is drier but still notably wetter than comparable areas of Egypt. Central andsouthern regions receive considerably less than 100 mm of rain each year. This large expanseof desert also experiences extremely high daytime temperatures, among the highest in theworld. Along the Mediterranean, temperatures are more variable - the weather ranges fromwarm and sunny to cooler and cloudier periods. April to September is almost entirely dry,even on the coast. Between March and June dry, dusty winds blow in from the desert,creating extremely hot and unpleasant conditions. Known as the ghibli, the winds are similarin nature to the khamsin of Egypt.UPDATED2005 Janes Information GroupThis page was saved from http://search.janes.com Did you know Janes Strategic Advisory Services can provide impartial, thoroughly researched market evaluation, providing© Janes Information Group, All rights reserved you with the same reliable insight you expect to find in our publications and online services?
  • 3. This page was saved from http://search.janes.com Did you know Janes Strategic Advisory Services can provide impartial, thoroughly researched market evaluation, providing© Janes Information Group, All rights reserved you with the same reliable insight you expect to find in our publications and online services?

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