COURSE SYNOPSIS
BACHELOR OF HUMAN SCIENCES (POLITICAL SCIENCE)
KULLIYYAH OF ISLAMIC REVEALED KNOWLEDGE & HUMAN SCIENCES
IN...
PSCI 1500 Introduction to Economics (3 credit hours)
The course focuses on basic theoretical tools of conventional micro a...
approaches in terms of conceptual constructs that may not be universally
applicable, and number of variables that may excl...
PSCI 2750 International Relations (3 credit hours)
This course analyses the theories, concepts and issues of international...
The course aims to:
1. Familiarize students with the political, economic and cultural role of the
Abbasids.
2. Examine the...
2. Point out the ethical dimension which characterizes Islamic administration
and to emphasize its importance in modern ma...
emergence of Muslim nation-states, the making of neo-colonialism, promotion of
Western hegemonic globalization or neo-colo...
PSCI 3125 Islamic Theory of International Relations I (3 credit hours)
It is argued that in Islam there exists no theory o...
3. Provide students with an opportunity to pursue a research project on
different categories of Malaysian thinkers, includ...
Environment (domestic and external), and (4) Policy Outcome (foreign policy
itself). Hence, topics this course seeks to di...
Southeast Asia states. In part-III of this course, a systematic analysis is undertaken of
the economic, political, securit...
4. Provide an in-depth knowledge about the various ways the people of
Southeast Asian states participate in the political ...
effective approaches and international political methods of communication
theories and methodologies.
6. Provide students ...
2. Sensitize students to the achievements and limits of international
organizations in establishing, maintaining, and prom...
occasions when they help to illuminate the background of thoughts. This course is
concerned not with the ideas set forth b...
consequences of Public Policies and thereby make public policies more pragmatic
and effective.
The course aims to:
1. Fami...
We will also emphasize on federal-state relations, federal-local relations, and state
local relations.
The course aims to:...
This is essentially an introductory course in organizational behaviour. It aims at
introducing students to the issues, the...
The course aims to:
1. Familiarize students with the concept of democratization in a comparative
fashion.
2. Instill in st...
general and Malaysian political economy in particular. After mastering the
concepts and approaches, students will examine ...
rather differently from what Marx meant by his Commune, by Lenin and his
successor Joseph Stalin, the post-Stalin Soviet U...
PSCI 4450 Nationalism and the Emergence of Nation-States (3 credit hours)
It is a comprehensive and critical study of the ...
The course aims to:
1. Familiarizing the student with some basic concepts in public budgeting and
finance;
2. Acquainting ...
The course aims to:
1. Explore and critically analyze the views and images portrayed by Western
political philosophers on ...
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Political science cs

Political science cs
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Internet      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Political science cs

  • 1. COURSE SYNOPSIS BACHELOR OF HUMAN SCIENCES (POLITICAL SCIENCE) KULLIYYAH OF ISLAMIC REVEALED KNOWLEDGE & HUMAN SCIENCES INTERNATIONAL ISLAMIC UNIVERSITY MALAYSIA PSCI 1010 Introduction to Political Science (3 credit hours) This course introduces students to the basic concepts and notions of political science in the areas of political theory, comparative politics, public administration and international relations. The topics will be surveyed from the Western perspectives; their shortcomings evaluated and, an Islamic alternative conceptualization will be provided. Combining the two perspectives, it provides students a base for advanced studies in the discipline. The course aims to: 1. Serve as a preparatory study for students majoring in political science and as a general overview for students of other concentration. 2. Make students understand the nature and scope of political science and how it affects people’s life directly and indirectly; 3. Make students understand the reasons why political science should be studied by Muslims 4. Identify the themes and issues discussed in the areas of: • Political Theory; • Comparative Politics; • International Relations; • Public Administration 5. Build the foundation of students in political science for future courses in the subject. PSCI 1020 Introduction to Law and Government (3 credit hours) The course mainly deals with basic concepts of law and government. These include the nature of law, major divisions of law, functions of law, sources of law and features and structures of political and legal systems. It identifies major issues in the interplay between law and politics. Case studies on recent issues on political and legal changes are also included. This course will also give special attention to the constitutional position of Islam and its role in moulding Malaysia’s political and legal system. The course aims to: 1. Introduce students to basic concepts of law and government. 2. Expose students to the basis and origin of the political and legal system. 3. Expose students to the interplay between law and politics. 4. Enable the students to understand the working of the Malaysian political and legal system.
  • 2. PSCI 1500 Introduction to Economics (3 credit hours) The course focuses on basic theoretical tools of conventional micro and macroeconomics. An appraisal of these constructs from the Islamic perspective is also discussed. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with relevant economic concepts both conventional and Islamic 2. Enable students to acquire understanding and exposure to economic theories and policies. 3. Enable students to appreciate the role of economic policies and their applications in managing public affairs PSCI 2110 Political Thought I (3 credit hours) This course aims to introduce the students to the major classical political thought of the Western and Muslim political thinkers The course aims to give the students a comprehensive understanding of major political classical ideas in the theory of the state– covering the works of Greek & Roman philosophers, Christian theologians and Muslim jurists PSCI 2210 Comparative Politics (3 credit hours) This introductory course on comparative politics is divided into three parts. Part-1 begins with an understanding of the nature of relationship between politics and government. It is followed by a brief discussion on democracy and a consideration of the definition, nature, and scope of comparative politics. Then the course provides a basic understanding of the basics of comparison. In this part, students would be familiarised with three basic levels (approaches) to study comparative politics: institutions, societies, and states. In this part the advantages and difficulties of research in comparative politics would be explained. Students would be made aware of various techniques in the study of comparative politics. Part-2 is devoted to an analysis of the relationship between politics and societies. As such, in this part students will learn about the following concepts: political culture, political communication, political participation, political development and class analysis. Parrt-3 links the government to the society by analysing the role of interest groups, political parties and elections in a political system. Finally in Part-4, this course provides insights into the workings of governments by discussing their structures. As such, in this part detailed discussion would be made of the following structures of governments: legislatures, the executive, the constitution and legal framework, the bureaucracy, and federal, unitary and local government. The course emphasizes the criteria, methods, and strengths of these approaches in relation to comparing various governments and their political systems. The course also underscores the inadequacies of these approaches in relation to comparing various governments and their political systems. The course also underscores the inadequacies of these
  • 3. approaches in terms of conceptual constructs that may not be universally applicable, and number of variables that may exclude many unique political factors in different societies. The course aims to: 1. Introduce students to the basic approaches used in the research of comparative politics 2. Know the strengths and weaknesses of these existing approaches 3. Introduce students to the basic issues in comparative politics PSCI 2520 Modern History of Europe (3 credit hours) This course surveys historical developments in Europe from 18th century to the present. It concentrates on the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial revolution, the two World Wars and the Cold War. Special attention will be paid to social and political developments. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with ideological and political discourse in modern Europe. 2. Develop an understanding of the social and economic developments in modern Europe. 3. Highlight European supremacy in modern world affairs PSCI 2523 Public Administration (3 credit hours) The course is designed to promote precise understanding among the students about Public Administration, particularly its basic concepts and underlying values. It discusses the origin and growth of the discipline, major theories of organization and management, bureaucracy, administrative processes including leadership communication, motivation and decentralization. The course also seeks to acquaint the students with the emerging paradigm (NPM) of Public Management. Finally, the course introduces some Islamic perspectives on the values of Public Administration seeking to enable the students to understand and resolve the tradeoffs between these values and those propagated in the Western approaches. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize the student with some basic concepts and values of Public Administration, 2. Expose the student to the economic, ethical, legal, and political dimensions of Public Administration; and 3. Acquaint the student with the tradeoffs or tensions among the values of Public Administration and with the possibility of resolving them, particularly from Islamic perspectives
  • 4. PSCI 2750 International Relations (3 credit hours) This course analyses the theories, concepts and issues of international relations. It stresses the dynamics and nature of contemporary international society by examining the causes [motives], limitations and results of the interaction of states at the international plane. It also assesses the role and function played by regional and global international organizations. It evaluates the various factors leading to international cooperation and integration between states, as well as those leading to armed and unarmed conflicts. It will also survey the nature, mechanism and effectiveness of collective security. It will assess the role of international law against the background of the realities of power politics at the international level. The course will stress on impact of the international system on the Muslim states, and the role that Muslim states could play in international relations. The course aims to: 1. Introduce the subject matter of International Relations to the undergraduate students who wish to study Political Science as a major as well as a minor subject. 2. Develop an awareness and appreciation for international issues among students. 3. Develop the analytical skills of students to understand and explain the forces of change and continuity in international relations in an orderly, dispassionate and theoretical manner PSCI 2999 Research Methodology (3 credit hours) (old code is PSCI 2010 Methodologies of Political Science) This course provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative approaches to research. It is designed to introduce students to a variety of concepts and issues in social research including the relationship between theory and research, formulation of research problem and hypothesis, measurement process, sampling, data collection techniques and data analysis. The course aims to: 1. Provide learners with an overview of research methods used in the social sciences and Islamic studies courses; 2. Provide students with opportunities to practice certain research skills in data collection, data processing and data analysis. PSCI 3011 The Abbasid Caliphate (3 credit hours) This course examines the Abbasid revolution and its socio-political consequences. It analyses the administrative structure, identity, and unity of the ummah. It highlights Muslim economic, cultural and scientific contributions. Special attention is paid to the Mongols invasion and its repercussions.
  • 5. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with the political, economic and cultural role of the Abbasids. 2. Examine the identity and unity of the Ummah during the Abbasid period. 3. Discuss the spread of Islam and the role of the Abbasids in world affairs. PSCI 3020 International Politics and the Muslim World (3 credit hours) It is often stated that the Muslim countries are passing through a particularly crucial period of time. Each one of them is faced with multi-various social, economic, security and political problems. The self-prestige of the Muslims and their self-belief in overcoming these challenges are at all time low. The Muslims find it easy to emotionally bond with the concept of the Ummah. However, the reality cannot be further from the truth. Although the Organisation of Islamic Conference (OIC) is often regarded as the symbol of Islamic unity, this has been unable to make its presence felt as a single voice of the Muslim countries on various international forums including the United Nations. The lack of unity among the Muslim countries, and the absence of a common position on global issues, many argue, has prevented these states from playing any meaningful role in international affairs. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with some key issues of the contemporary international system that affect the foreign and security policies of the Muslim states. 2. Provide an understanding of the challenges to Muslim unity. 3. Examine the means of effective cooperation in political, economic, and social dimensions among the Muslim countries. 4. Determine the place of the Muslim countries in the contemporary debate on various issues in the international system. 5. Equip students with the knowledge and understanding of foreign and security policy issues of the Muslim states. PSCI 3023 Islamic Principles and Practices of Public Administration (3 credit hours) The course introduces students to the principles and practices of administrative organization and behavior as enshrined in the Holy Qur’an and the Sunnah, and as have been practiced by the Prophet Muhammad S.A.W, the Rashideen R.A.A, Umayyad and Abbasid periods. Topics include principles of administration, administrative leadership, and organization and behavior. The course aims to: 1. Expose the students to the realities of administration as have been practiced in the Islamic administration, and to analyze the principles of management laid down by early Muslims and to compare and contrast such principles with contemporary principles of administration.
  • 6. 2. Point out the ethical dimension which characterizes Islamic administration and to emphasize its importance in modern management of public organizations PSCI 3033 Public Personnel Administration (3 credit hours) The course introduces the student to the origin, development and importance of Personnel Administration. In particular, it intends to familiarize the students with major tools of Personnel Administration and their application in the public sector. The course defines the subject, tackles its technical as well as human dimensions and exposes the students to recent innovations and current concerns in the field. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize the students with the basic concepts and values of public personnel administration. 2. Expose the student to major tools, policies and practices being pursued by modern governments in managing people at work. 3. Expose the student to the ethical, legal, technical and political dimensions of Personnel Administration and their implications PSCI 3035 Public Policy Making (3 credit hours) Today many Political scientists have shifted their focus to Public Policy - to the description and explanation of the causes and consequences of government activity. This course intends to focus on the content of public policy; and analysis of social, economic, and political forces on the content of public policy; an inquiry into the effect of various institutional arrangements and political processes on public policy; and an evaluation of the consequences of public policies on society, both expected and unexpected. The Islamic perspectives on public policy making will be at the centre of analysing these issues. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize the students with what governments do, why they do it what difference it makes; 2. Understand the causes and consequences of policy decisions, 3. Enable the student to apply social science knowledge to the solution of practical problems; 4. Sensitize the student regarding “right” policies to achieve the “right” goals; and 5. Advance the level of political awareness, and improve the quality of public policy. PSCI 3060 Colonialism and Neo Colonialism in the Muslim World (3 credit hours) This course explores and examines the impact of colonialism and neo colonialism in the Muslim world. Topics include: European penetration into the Muslim world, anti-colonial movements, acceptance of European ideas by Muslim elite, the
  • 7. emergence of Muslim nation-states, the making of neo-colonialism, promotion of Western hegemonic globalization or neo-colonization The course aims to: 1. Provide a clear understanding to the students about colonialism, its aims and objectives and to be critical of its implications in the Muslim World. 2. Help students understand and analyse the anti-colonial movements, ideology of nationalism and the emergence of nation-states. 3. Make students aware of the strategies and tactics of imperialism and neo- colonialism so that they would be critical of the relevant issues in the contemporary times and be reflecting on the Islamic solution. PSCI 3111 Political Thought II (3 credit hours) This course explores and examines modern western and Muslim political thought. Western thinkers included are Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel and Marx. Muslim thinkers included are Shah Wali Allah, Jamal al din al Afghani, Mohammad Abduhu and Rashid Rida. It also highlights the epistemological and ideological differences between western and Muslim political thought. Besides this, the course also points out the impact of these western thinkers in contemporary political ideologies and issues and the relevance of the ideas of these Muslim thinkers on Khilafah, Shariah and Ummah for the revitalization of contemporary Muslim Ummah. The course aims to: 1. Provide students with a critical insight into Western political theories on state and government. 2. Acquaint students with the development of key Islamic political concepts and institutions and their significance in the contemporary context. PSCI 3120 Ethnics Politics in Malaysia (3 credit hours) This course is an exposition of the intricacies of the politics of the ethnically diverse Malaysian society. Topics include: the nature of ethnic diversity and its impact on political relations; the role of leadership in effecting harmony and change; the interrelationship between Malaysian culture and the ongoing structural changes; Islamic reassertion; and ethnicity and politics. The course aims to: 1. Investigate the political significance of ethnicity and the nature of communal diversity in Malaysia. 2. Stimulate critical analyses of the government and communal leaders in their handling of ethnic problems and establishing political legitimacy and stability. 3. Provide students with an opportunity to conduct research on different ethnic issues in this country.
  • 8. PSCI 3125 Islamic Theory of International Relations I (3 credit hours) It is argued that in Islam there exists no theory of international relations. If, however, there exists one, it is mainly discussed in the form of juridical rulings and legal maxims or laws. While it is true that systematic study of Islamic theory of international relations does not exist in the writings of Muslim scholars and jurists. Its raw materials are in abundance, however. They can be found in Qur’anic instructions, Prophetic traditions and Muslim historical intellectual legacy. Therefore, this course attempts to develop a theory of international relations that is capable of describing the nature of interactions (i.e. international relations) among the international actors from an Islamic perspective. The course therefore will focus in Part I on the history of international relations in Islam, the rulings developed by Muslims jurists regarding relations between the different types of international actors in times of war and peace, and in Part II the essential assumptions of an Islamic theory of international relations that can describe the nature of international system. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with issues related to Islamic view of International Relations 2. Introduce the idea of Islamic theory of International Relations to the undergraduate students who wish to study Political Science as a major as well as a minor subject. 3. Develop an awareness and appreciation that Islam has its own approach to international relations that is both unique and normative in nature. 4. Develop the analytical skills of students to understand and explain the forces of change and continuity in present western dominated International Relations from an Islamic perspective in an orderly, dispassionate, academic and theoretical manner. PSCI 3130 Malaysian Political Ideas and Experience (3 credit hours) This course critically examines the political thought of leading Malaysian political thinkers from the early 20th century until the present. Representative thinkers include: Sheikh Tahir Jalaluddin, Ibrahim Yaakob, Tunku Abdul Rahman, Dato’ Onn Jaafar, Burhanuddin Helmi, Zulkifli Muhammad, Ishak Haji Muhammad, Mahathir Mohamad, and others. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with some leading Malaysian thinkers and statesmen, their ideas, activities and contributions that have shaped and developed the nation and society. 2. Stimulate critical analyses regarding the various political ideas and wisdoms which have developed since independence.
  • 9. 3. Provide students with an opportunity to pursue a research project on different categories of Malaysian thinkers, including statesmen, ulama, and nationalists. PSCI 3135 Islamic Theory of International Relations II (3 credit hours) Not available PSCI 3160 Islam in Contemporary Southeast Asia (3 credit hours) This course focuses on political Islam and contemporary Islamic issues in both regional and global level. It involves exploring Islam within the context of the state, government and its policies, and political and socioeconomic institutions, (Islamic movements/separatists/resistance). Such circumstances resulted in political crisis for both Muslim majorities and minorities and its counteractions. The course also examines the effects of modernization (or deprivation, where applicable) and globalization especially following the 9/11 attack of the sentiment and political action of Muslims. Various major Islamic issues and events will be analyzed. The course also discusses this region’s interaction with Middle East Muslims toward contemporary Islamic issues/crisis in general. The course aims to: 1. Inculcate a sense of awareness concerning regional current issues involving Muslims: its governments, national politics, possibilities, advantages or limitations of interaction within the region as a result of different history, demographics and nation and state building process. 2. Make students understand political Islam and its significance to political power and its role in re-moulding of state and society. 3. Make students understand the unique characteristics and contribution of political Islam represents both a countervailing force to the regional/global political order as well as to existing political regimes. 4. Stimulate critical analyses regarding political Islam in the region , future trends and issues involving Muslim states, Muslim citizens/population and intra-regional relationships 5. Promote students’ academic and intellectual capability, due to the nature of the subject that follows no specific/scientific rules nor equations. PSCI 321 0 Foreign Policy Decision Making (3 credit hours) This course analyzes in a systematic and comprehensive manner decision-making in the foreign policy context. A major focus of the course concerns the set of assumptions about the causal interpretation of the behavior of states in the international arena. The course, both in normal and crisis contexts of foreign policy- decision making , mainly focuses on the study of dynamics and forces that exert influence as well as guide decision-making in the capitals of nations of world. Topics, therefore, this course seeks to highlight revolve around four basic structures: (1) National Interests, (2) the Foreign Policy Process (3) the Foreign Policy
  • 10. Environment (domestic and external), and (4) Policy Outcome (foreign policy itself). Hence, topics this course seeks to discuss include: systematic study of national interest, foreign policy decision regimes, role of idiosyncrasies (personality types, ideology, belief, etc.) in formulation of national interests and foreign policy, internal and external dynamics of foreign policy such as executives, legislature, bureaucracies, civil society (domestic and international) international law, political culture, regime types, power and capabilities, the nature of international system, international organizations, etc., and models of foreign policy decision-making. The course aims to: 1. Provide students with up-to-date intellectual understanding of Decision- Making and Foreign Policy Analysis. 2. Introduce to the students the dynamics and forces involved in foreign policy formulations and foreign policy analysis. 3. Develop an awareness and ability in the students to see foreign policy in its right context. 4. Develop the analytical skills of students to understand and explain the forces of change and continuity in inter-state relations in an orderly and dispassionate manner. PSCI 3220 Comparative Politics of the Muslim World (3 credit hours) The course discusses political geography of the Muslim World, political development during colonial and independence periods, monarchies, presidential and parliamentary systems, executive-legislative and judicial systems, political parties and participation, democratization, Organisation of Islamic Conference OIC and Muslim unity. The course aims to familiarize students with political systems and governments of various Muslim countries. It helps them to identify basic characteristics and problems of the political systems, compare and contrast among the systems, and think about solutions for further development of political systems in the Muslim world. PSCI 3250 ASEAN Foreign Policy (3 credit hours) This course analyses the foreign policies of member-states of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) within the context of that regional organization. In order to do that, we need to examine the development of ASEAN as an entity for political enquiry since the organisation’s establishment in 1967. Therefore, part-I of this course provides an analysis of the main features of Southeast Asia as a region. This enquiry will take place within an international relations framework. With this objective in view, part- I of this course is also devoted to a theoretical explanation of regionalism in Southeast Asia. Part-II introduces ASEAN as an organization by analysing the evolution of ASEAN, its aims and objectives, its structures, intra-ASEAN political relations and structures of decision-making in ASEAN states, and the impact of the end of the Cold War on foreign and defence policies of the
  • 11. Southeast Asia states. In part-III of this course, a systematic analysis is undertaken of the economic, political, security, foreign policies of the ASEAN states. The course aims to: 1. Explain the development of ASEAN as a regional organization within the vast theoretical literature of International Relations; 2. Familiarize students with some of the on-going issues affecting the foreign policies of ASEAN states; 3. Develop the analytical skills of students so that they can explain various issues affecting the foreign policies of ASEAN states in a systematic manner PSCI 3320 Political and Governmental Systems in Southeast Asia (3 credit hours) Mainstream comparative politics literature has kept up with the pace of changing nature of contemporary politics in Southeast Asia, which consists of the following ten countries: Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines, Brunei, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. These countries follow a wide range of political systems: from military (Myanmar), absolute monarchy (Brunei) and communist (Vietnam and Laos) and to democratic (Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand and the Philippines). This course is being offered to impart knowledge about these countries in comparative perspective to the younger generation so that they become aware of the nature, and complexities of politics of the countries of Southeast Asia. This is the only way to continue to develop a deep understanding of the social, economic and political problems of those countries. This course adopts Almond and Powell’s political system approach which argues that a political system exists in a domestic and an international environment, moulding these environments and being moulded by them. This course is divided into two main parts. Part-I deals with some theoretical issues in comparative politics. Part-II would deal with case studies. Each case study is structured around four questions: Who governs, how do they govern, how do the people take part in politics and with what results? In order to do so this and help the process of comparison, each case study is divided into the same four sections: • Political development and political culture. • The political system • Representation and participation • Public policies. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with contributions made by different groups of scholars in the development of Southeast Asian studies. 2. Impart an understanding of the governmental and political systems in Southeast Asia. 3. Prepare students to carry out independent research on various aspects of Southeast Asian states.
  • 12. 4. Provide an in-depth knowledge about the various ways the people of Southeast Asian states participate in the political process. 5. Provide an understanding of the ethno-religious mosaic of Southeast Asian states. PSCI 3410 Islah and Tajdid Movements in the Muslim World (3 credit hours) IÎlÉh / TajdÊd, or reform and revival activities in the Muslim world, is indeed an important and ongoing phenomenon in Islamic history. Prophet Muhamed (s.a.w.) is reputed as al MuÎlih al-c AÐim (Reformer Par Excellence) and al-KulafÉ’ al-RashidËn (The Rightly - Quided Caliphs) had their distinguished contribution in this respect. Whenever a Muslim society experiences decay, there will be reformers calling for the removal of al-Bidac (un-Islamic practices) and the return with Islam to its original purity. This course looks into the contribution of some early Mujaddids, but the emphasis will be on the history of the movement since the 18th century. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize the students with the ongoing concept of IÎlÉh and TajdÊd that is based on the all important principle of IjtihÉd. 2. Study the various approaches to cure the malaise of the Ummah in modern times. 3. Acquaint the students with the role and scholarship of some Muslim thinkers and activists in pre-modern and modern times. PSCI 3510 Media and Politics (3 credit hours) This course will embark on critical analysis and appraisal of the relationship between politics and media or what could be referred to as “media politics” and “political communication”. Hence, media is employed to achieve the aims and goals of political actors at the local, national, regional and global or international level. Needles to say, we shall highlight the Islamic perspective and its distinction from the Western perspective as far as political communication and its role in the political processes are concerned. The course aims to: 1. Help students learn the various skills and approaches used by international communicators in trying to bring themselves closer to their audiences and making their messages clearer to the target receivers. 2. Highlight the various approaches of religion-political marketing so as to arrive at a better Islamic propagation methodology. 3. Provide students with an appreciation of the media’s key role in contemporary politics and policy making shaping political dynamics and behavior. 4. Provide students with insights into the ways in which the media shapes politics and also the ways in which political actors try to use the media to their advantage. 5. Help students practice such skills so as to acquire practical abilities of
  • 13. effective approaches and international political methods of communication theories and methodologies. 6. Provide students with the opportunity to develop a more sophisticated understanding of contemporary political and policy issues and the skills to critically evaluate the political aspects of media content, regulatory arrangement, and the interaction between the political and media players. PSCI 3620 International Political Economy (3 credit hours) Among the issues the course deals with include: mercantilism, liberalism, neo- liberalism, structuralism, international trade, finance, investment, exchange rate and monetary system, debt and foreign aid, globalization, regional trade blocks, north-south issues, MNCs, global environmental and poverty issues, politics of oil, Muslim World oil resources, Islamic common market and the political economy of the Muslim World. The course aims to: 1. Introduce students to the basic concepts and main parameters of International Political Economy (IPE). 2. Critically examine different paradigms of IPE. 3. Evaluate the practical application of International trade and International finance and define patterns of exploitations and misuse of political and economic powers of pursuing self-aggrandizement. 4. Sensitize the student to some of the outstanding problems within the North- South context. 5. Examine political economy of the Muslim world. PSCI 3720 International Organizations (3 credit hours) The course will cover international organizations from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. In the first part of the course, we will provide a necessary theoretical background to the study of international organizations: theories impacting international organizations, varieties of regionalism, and the role of international law. The second part is dedicated to the study of the two major attempts to bring world peace through international organizations: the League of Nations, and the United Nations (UN). In the third part of the course, we will take on several case studies from among the following organizations: the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Arab League, the Organization of African Unity (OAU), the European Union (EU), multi-national corporations (MNCs), non-governmental international organizations (e.g. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Oxfam etc.). The choice of case studies may vary from one semester to another. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with the quest for order and durable peace through international organizations;
  • 14. 2. Sensitize students to the achievements and limits of international organizations in establishing, maintaining, and promoting order and cooperation among nations; 3. Examine the forces that enhance peace or conflict, and critically evaluate mechanisms available to manage conflict and build durable peace; 4. Acquaint students with some major international organizations of both, governmental and non-governmental, types. 5. Enable students to gain an appreciation of Muslims countries’ role in international organizations, particularly in the area of peacekeeping and peace-making. PSCI 4000 Internship (3 credit hours) Practical Training PSCI 4001 Cyberpolitics (3 credit hours) This course aims at introducing politics through internet and explaining how computer, technology and the Internet may change things. The topic areas covered in this course are: Internet as an avenue for individual empowerment and increase corporate, government and bureaucratic over information, direct democracy, the digital divide, the western dominance over the Internet and its impact upon Muslim society. Computer mediated civic actions like voting; democratic participation or digital democracy, the negative affect on the political system like distributing false information, invading privacy etc The course aims to: 1. Introduce students to the Cyber-world. 2. Enable students to directly experience the unique aspects of cyber-culture. 3. Assist students in developing skills to use the cyber space for political analysis. 4. Make students aware of the use of the Internet by political actors to promote and achieve their objectives. 5. Make students aware of the positive and negative effects of the cyberspace. PSCI 4010 Contemporary Islamic Political Thought (3 credit hours) This course is devoted to two basic themes and their ramifications: the concept of the Islamic State from the time it was revived after the abolition of the Caliphate in Turkey, and the Muslim response to the challenge of the alien, modern ideologies of secularism, nationalism, democracy and socialism. In responding to these challenges, contemporary Islamic thinkers either associate with an ongoing movement or founded a movement of their own. This course will, therefore, also study the Islamic movements and the phenomena of Islamic resurgence. This course deals largely with the major political ideas among Muslims in the twentieth century: history and sociology will be discussed to aid only on those
  • 15. occasions when they help to illuminate the background of thoughts. This course is concerned not with the ideas set forth by Muslims but with those ideas which are Islamic – that is to say, are articulated in the recognized terms and categories of Islamic jurisprudence, theology and related disciplines, however much they may sound unorthodox or unconventional. Consequently, this course studies the ideas of only those thinkers whose creedal, epistemological and methodological premises have ensured the continuity of Islamic thought. The thinkers selected for this course include: Malek Bennabi, Hasan al Banna, Syed Qutb, Mohammed Iqbal, Syed Abul Ala Mawdudi, Ayatullah Ruhullah Khomeini, Ali Shari’ati and Hasan Turabi. The course aims to: 1. Provide understanding of the contributions of Muslim scholars and activists towards the development of Islamic Political Thought. 2. Make students critically appreciate the ideas, concepts and theories of these thinkers, their activism and movements towards the generation of Islamic Ummah vis-a-vis mankind. 3. Enable the students to come up with more creative ideas on the modern and post-modern political problems. PSCI 4020 Political Ideologies (3 credit hours) This course introduces students to the meaning and nature of ideologies and presents to them the main tenets of some dominant western political ideologies. It also makes an Islamic analysis of the ideologies and presents Islamic stance on the given issues. The course aims to: 1. Provide an understanding of the internal logic, assumptions and value judgment upon which ideologies are based. 2. Make the students comprehend and reflect on the ideological differences between Islam and the Western political ideologies so as to make the students alert on the changing ideological landscape in contemporary times. PSCI 4035 Public Policy Analysis (3 credit hours) In recent years Public Policy Analysis has drawn a considerable interest of scholars and practitioners with varied disciplinary background. The growing consensus on its role is improving policy process, policy contents and outcomes have made it one of the central issues at different levels. This course focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects of Public Policy Analysis. While it draws, in part, on Public Policy Making, it is distinct in that it focuses more specifically on the process of Policy Analysis, Analytical tools, models and approaches etc. It also deals with relevant actors and factors in Policy Analysis. This intended to permit and objective assessment of social, economic, political, administrative and environmental
  • 16. consequences of Public Policies and thereby make public policies more pragmatic and effective. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize the students with what governments do, why and how they it and with what results. 2. Acquaint the students with basic concepts and issues relating to Public Policy Analysis and the methods and tools used therein. 3. Enable the students to learn and apply knowledge in analyzing social problems and specific public policies they are familiar with 4. Enhance the analytical skills and advance the level of policy awareness among the students so that they can play some role in improving the quality of public policies. PSCI 4040 Policy Issues in Science and Technology (3 credit hours) This course rests on the assumption that science and technology have become major causal forces in contemporary society, which includes the Muslim Ummah. It is intended to provide an overview of the role of science and technology in the public policy process, and to explore the impact of public policy on science and technology. These two perspectives are radically distinct, yet intertwined in the broader process of public policymaking. Findings from science and technology research are used everyday by decision makers to justify policy decisions and frame debates. As such, the readings for this course will come from a variety of disciplines, including the public understanding of science literature, science and technology studies, readings and research in public policy processes and interest groups, and from various substantive science and technology issue areas. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with the principal issues raised by the need to build indigenous scientific and technological base 2. Point out the significance of knowledge society and knowledge based economy in this age of globalization 3. Build understanding of policies and strategies geared towards acquisition of science and technology capabilities in Muslim countries. 4. Discuss issues pertaining to transfer of technology and diffusion of innovations 5. Build analytical and presentation skills for discussing complex science and technology issues in a policy context. PSCI 4045 Intergovernment Relations (3 credit hours) This course examines relations between the various branches in a federalist system of government. While power is divided among states, localities, and the federal government, public problems rarely fall neatly within a single political unit. Many regional concerns spill across jurisdictional boundaries, which can lead to policy response that are fragmented, contradictory, or simply ineffective. This course will also examine key theoretical and policy debates in intergovernmental relations.
  • 17. We will also emphasize on federal-state relations, federal-local relations, and state local relations. The course aims to: 1. Discuss and evaluate the issues and concepts that influence political life in federal states. 2. Enhance the students’ understanding of political science methods and approaches. 3. Prepare students for careers in government, the media, business and Academia. PSCI 4050 International Law and Diplomacy (3 credit hours) The course deals with the role and function of international law and diplomacy at the international plane. Topics include both legal and diplomatic issues, institutions and procedures. The course aims to: 1. Understand the role and function of law and power at the international plane. 2. Comprehend how knowledge of the subject can contribute to a better management of affairs between states, and especially the Muslim states. PSCI 4051 Bureaucracy and Public Policy Implementation (3 credit hours) The purpose of this course is to provide understanding on the roles of public bureaucracy in the policy implementation. In other words, it is an attempt to investigate what happen after a bill becomes law. It discusses overview of bureaucracy, why we study bureaucracy, nature of governmental activity, functions and tools of the government, bureaucracy and policy implementation, policy efficiency and effectiveness. It also addressing some real cases in several areas of public policy including education, environment, social welfare, law enforcement and others. The course aims to: 1. Analyze the functions of public bureaucracy in the policy implementation process. 2. Provide an understanding of different policy implementation model and exposing them with various implementation problems. 3. Offer the opportunity to apply theoretical framework to practical situation and considering challenges confronting public bureaucracy, the concept of accountability and proposal for reform. PSCI 4060 Organizational Theory and Behavior (3 credit hours)
  • 18. This is essentially an introductory course in organizational behaviour. It aims at introducing students to the issues, theories and models derived from behavioural sciences which are of direct relevance to administration and management in the public sector. It also points out how knowledge of people’s behaviour helps develop better managers. In addition, Islamic issues in Organizational Behaviour will be touched upon The course aims to: 1. Explain concepts and theories of organization and organizational behaviour 2. Point out their relevance for management in the public sector 3. Explain Islamic perspectives to organizational behaviour PSCI 4110 Peace and War Studies (3 credit hours) The course shall deal with the fundamental issues of Peace and War at the International Plain. It shall examine the pre-requisites of the conditions (structure) of peace and the problems of war. It shall examine the causes of war, its role in International Relations and the evolution of its doctrine. It shall examine how development of both military technology and International society affected the dimensions of both diplomacy and strategy. The course shall examine how International society attempted in the past to regulate and control the use of force by states. It shall examine whether International society can succeed in preventing the use of force by states and if so how? What are the problems and what are the ways for establishing the conditions of peace in the future? The course aims to: 1. Introduce students to the nature, scope and methodology of peace studies. 2. Explore some major contemporary problems which threaten peaceful and just relations among nations. 3. Examine the strategies adopted by various international organisations to regulate conflict and promote peace. 4. Analyze specific cases to understand the problems of war and peace. PSCI 4111 Contemporary Democratic Transition (3 credit hours) This course is an overview of the Third Wave of democratization, with a special section on the state of democracy – or the lack thereof – in the Muslim world. The course has three main parts. Part I surveys theoretical and conceptual frameworks and debates, in particular issues surrounding transition, consolidation, and breakdown of democratic regimes, the role of the elites and civil society, two-track reforms, institutional, constitutional and electoral designs, and political culture. Part II makes a comparative study of the Third Wave of democratization in selected countries. Finally, Part III discusses issues related to Islam and democracy, and makes a modest survey of several Muslim countries.
  • 19. The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with the concept of democratization in a comparative fashion. 2. Instill in students analytical approach to comparative politics. 3. Make students critically appreciate the problems of governance in the Muslim world. 4. Familiarize students with essential concepts related to democratization vis-à- vis shūrā. 5. Provide students empirical knowledge about contemporary democratization processes. PSCI 4120 Issues in Malaysian Politics (3 credit hours) This course analyzes some of the important issues in Malaysian politics. It focuses on issues such as plural nature of the society, the nature of nationalism and the problem of national unity. The constitutional framework, the monarchy and its adaptability, federal-state relations, elections and the nature of representation will also be examined. In addition, this course will analyze the role of Islam in Malaysian politics, Rukun Negara, Vision 2020, the economic crisis and its political implications, and ethics in politics. In addition, the course will focus on contemporary political issues in Malaysia The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with the major issues in Malaysian politics. 2. Provide an opportunity for students interested in Malaysian politics to conduct research related to various political issues in the country PSCI 4150 Political Economy of Malaysia (3 credit hours) This course discusses some theoretical approaches to the study of political economy as they are applied to the Malaysian context. Along this line, key issues of Malaysian political economy are analyzed. They include the politics of “Bumiputraism” and developmentalism, capitalist entrenchment and state-led development, rent seeking and political patronage, industrialization strategies and labour policies, globalization and regional cooperation, and the place of Islam in Malaysian economy. The 1997 financial woes and its resultant political impact will be given special attention. In addition to these, more recent development in the nation’s path to economic recovery will also be analyzed. These include the dual track economic development model adopted by the government to address the problem of over reliance on external demands to sustain economic growth and the viability of Dr. Mahathir’s proposal to make Islamic Gold Dinar a currency for international trade, hence overcoming the world’s over dependency on US Dollar. The course aims to sensitize students to some of the skills and tools of Malaysian political economy through an examination of some of the key issues in the Malaysian context. Through extensive directed reading, students will examine some of the dominant concepts and approaches to understanding political economy in
  • 20. general and Malaysian political economy in particular. After mastering the concepts and approaches, students will examine some key issues in Malaysian political economy through rigorous analysis of specific case studies. PSCI 4260 U.S Foreign Policy (3 credit hours) The 9/11 terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers in New York and the Pentagon have brought about fundamental changes in the way the U.S. conducts its foreign policy. The attacks on Afghanistan to remove the Taliban government in November 2001 and the announcement of the Bush Doctrine in September 2002 and the invasion and occupation of Iraq in April 2003 by coalition forces (mainly American) to many is a confirmation that Washington is bent on following a policy of unilateralism and pre-emptive strike. The occupation of Iraq by the coalition forces proved to be highly divisive. The debates over Iraq polarised not the American society but it brought about cracks in the American traditional close alliance with some European countries, most notably France and Germany. Washington’s “war on terrorism” has raised suspicions, and questions – particularly in the Muslim world – about the intentions of the United States. Any explanation of the American foreign policy must begin with an analysis of the making of the US foreign policy. Therefore, first, the main sources of the American foreign policy would be discussed. Then, an attempt is made to analyse the lessons drawn by the U.S. of its involvement during the Cold War. Finally, this course analyses the American foreign policy since the end of the Cold War. The course aims to: 1. Provide an in-depth understanding of US foreign policy and present a critical assessment of Washington’s involvement in different regions of the world with particular reference to Europe, Asia and Africa. 2. Offer a critical analysis of major issues that affects the US on the one hand and countries of Europe, Asia and Africa, on the other. 3. Assess the role of the US in some selected regional issues, which in particular, affect the Muslim countries. 4. Evaluate the value of explanatory and interpretative approaches to the study of US foreign policy. 5. Consider the implications of the involvement of the US in various international crises and conflicts. PSCI 4270 Post-Soviet Politics (3 credit hours) One of the most powerful states in the history of the world, the Soviet Union disappeared rather suddenly, and rather quietly. Though the Soviet Union disintegrated into fifteen states, the Russian Federation was declared as its principle successor state upon its demise in 1991. This course therefore would focus mainly on the study of the government and political process of the principal successor state of the Soviet Union. Topics this course seeks to highlight include a brief history of the Soviet Union envisioned by Karl Marx in his writings and practically created, and
  • 21. rather differently from what Marx meant by his Commune, by Lenin and his successor Joseph Stalin, the post-Stalin Soviet Union under Leonard Brezhnev, Mikhail Gorbachev’s rather radical structural political and economic reforms that put Soviet Union on the road to transition from totalitarian politics and planned economy to free-market democracy, the creation of Russian Federation and constitutional, political and economic upheavals it experienced, including efforts at stabilizing constitutional structures, consolidating democracy, developing durable political parties, confronting secessionist movements, national interests, security policies, foreign policy directions and expansion of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The course aims to: 1. Familiarize students with history of creation of Soviet Union and the developments leading to its collapse. 2. Analyze and critically examine Mikhail Gorbachev’s structural political and economic reforms aimed at recreation of the Soviet Union as envisaged by Karl Marx. 3. Acquaint students with processes that led to creation of Russian Federation 4. Enable students to gain more knowledge of the political dynamics of Russian Federations. PSCI 4410 Theories of Political Development (3 credit hours) It is a comprehensive and critical study of the theories of political development originated in the West. It critically explores several topics related to the study of development which include various definitions and interpretations of the concepts - Modernization, Development, Political Development, Political Modernization and problems in these conceptions; goals and objectives of Political Development; characteristics and Problems of Modernization and Development and Apter's Structural Theory; Verba's Sequential Model of Development; Development Syndrome - Differentiation - Equality – Capacity; The Development of Political Development; Political Change in Asia, Africa and Middle East and problems of Political development; Political change in Central America and South America and problems of political Development; Phases and Patterns of Political Development; Dependency Theories; Western critique of Political Development Theories; Islamic critique of Political Development theories; Different Patterns and Models of Development, Modernization and Political development from Islamic paradigm. The course aims to: 1. Provide a comprehensive understanding to the students of political development theories of the West 2. Let them critically evaluate the theories, estimating their merits and demerits, positive effects and negative implications both on the Western and Muslim states 3. Enable the students to seriously reflect and bring creative ideas and theories to construct a model for political development model Islamic perspective
  • 22. PSCI 4450 Nationalism and the Emergence of Nation-States (3 credit hours) It is a comprehensive and critical study of the ideology of Nationalism and the emergence of its product, nation state. The study includes several topics which include various definitions and connotations of the terms Nationalism and Nation State, national self-determination, national integration etc. origin and development of Nationalism -ancient Greek and Hebrew traits, medieval controversies of sovereignty - clash between Pope and Emperors and other issues which give birth to Nationalism and Nation - State in the West. Early Philosophical Contribution to Nationalism: J.J. Rousseau, J.G Helder, J.G. Fichte and Hegel, modern trends of Nationalism [Polycentric nationalism, ethnocentric nationalism and others and the modern nation-states; spreed of Nationalism in the Muslim world and the Muslim response presented by some Muslim thinkers from Turkey, the Arab world and the Indian sub-continet; Western Critique of Nationalism and Nation-State; Islamic analysis of Nationalism and the Nation-State. Problems of the re-organization of Muslim Ummah and the future Islamic World Order. The course aims to: 1. Give students a comprehensive and clear perception of the ideology of Nationalism and its implications on the West and in the Muslim World. 2. Inspire students to perceive the problems generated from nationalism and the nation-state system. 3. Stimulate students to seriously ponder over the re-organization of Islamic Ummah and related issues. PSCI 4610 Ethics and Politics (3 credit hours) (old code is PSCI 3610) This course aims to introduce the students to the political ethics of a few major thinkers. The topics comprising of Chinese, Indian, Greek, Muslim, Western thinkers and real politic. The course aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the relationship of ethics and politics – its theoretical foundation and its practical implications PSCI 4645 Government Finance (3 credit hours) The course introduces students to public budgeting and finance. While the course discusses and analyzes the revenue and expenditure operations of modern states, a particular emphasis is placed on the special features of the public finance in developing countries and on Islamic perspectives on fiscal reforms. Topics include the nature and scope of government finance, government budgeting, fiscal functions of the government, the sources and consequences of government revenues and expenditures, fiscal policy and monetary policy and government finance in an Islamic economy.
  • 23. The course aims to: 1. Familiarizing the student with some basic concepts in public budgeting and finance; 2. Acquainting the student with the ways and means of acquiring public resources and with the alternative ways of spending them to achieve public policy goals; 3. Exposing the student to the economic, ethical, legal, and political implications of the different sources of financing government operations; and 4. Making the student aware of some perennial problems with the public finances of developing countries, and thus enabling him/her to appreciate the need for fiscal reforms, particularly along Islamic lines. PSCI 4710 Survey of Political History (3 credit hours) This course provides an overview of the political history of the world from the Islamic and Western perspectives. The major thrust of the course is to explain the key transformations from ancient times up to the present. Student needs to have some basic understanding of the main developments in the history of world politics, as well as some kind of context for thinking about the contemporary period of world political history. The course follows a chronological order of events starting with an overview of international society from its origins in ancient Greece through to the new millennium. Topics include: ancient Greece and renaissance Italy, Islamic political history, the Westphalia European International Society, the classical balance of power system of the 19th century, colonialism, the First World War, the League of Nations, the Second World War, the UNs system, self-determination and decolonization, the Cold War and the competing visions of the Post-Cold War World. The course aims to: 1. Provide students with a comprehensive overview of the political history of the world from the Islamic and Western perspectives. 2. Acquaint the student with the rise and fall of the major world civilizations. 3. Help the student gain insight into the rise and development of the scientific, industrial and technological revolutions and their world-wide political repercussions. 4. Provide the student with the necessary analytical skills of explaining current issues by reference to historical forces. PSCI 4910 Women in Politics (3 credit hours) This course shall explore and analyze the views of a few western political thinkers from Plato to Marx and would also critically study a few schools of thought in feminism which include liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, gender and postmodern feminism and others. It shall also make a study of the status and role given to woman by Islam and will also investigate how far this status and role are enjoyed by woman in Muslim societies
  • 24. The course aims to: 1. Explore and critically analyze the views and images portrayed by Western political philosophers on women. 2. Make a critical study of the various schools of thought of feminism for the liberation and empowerment of women. 3. Study the position and social role of women in Islam and in Muslim Society. PSCI 4997 Advanced Research Methodology (3 credit hours) (old code is PSCI 4999 Research Methodology) This course is designed to introduce students to the epistemology and methodology of political science research from Western and Islamic perspectives. It examines the nature of political science and the ways political scientists do research and introduces some basic statistical interpretation and application. It emphasizes the relationship between theory, research, and practice, and integrates various research activities in an orderly framework. The final part of the course introduces the student to SPSS - based data analysis techniques for descriptive and inferential statistics. This course is a sequel to PSCI 2999 The course aims to: 1. Acquaint students with the fundamental philosophical precepts of political science and their compatibility with the framework of Islamic values. 2. Introduce students to the ways of conducting research in political science 3. Provide the most basic statistical skills and their 4. Prepare students to undertake independent scholarly research Produced by: Office of Deputy Dean’s Human Sciences Division Kulliyyah of Islamic Revealed Knowledge & Human Sciences International Islamic University Malaysia As at January 2008

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