 IT is my duty to record my sincere thanks and
deep sense of gratitude to my respected teacher
Mrs. SONU ma’am for her va...
 This is to certify that Pooja Sharma of class- 9
has made the project “sustainable development
“ under my supervision an...
 Agriculture has changed dramatically, especially since the
end of World War II. Food and fiber productivity soared due
t...
 Sustainable agriculture integrates three main
goals--environmental health, economic
profitability, and social and econom...
 Water
 Energy
 Air
 Soil
• Agriculture Crops
• Horticulture crops
• Live stock
- Cattle
- Poultry
- Pig
- Horse
- Donkey
- Sheep & goats
• Bee Keep...
 Sustainable production practices involve a variety of
approaches. Specific strategies must take into account
topography,...
 A common philospohy
among sustainable agriculture practitioners is that a
"healthy" soil is a key component of sustainab...
 In the early part of this century, most farms integrated both crop
and livestock operations. Indeed, the two were highly...
Pooja s
Pooja s
Pooja s
Pooja s
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Pooja s

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pooja s

  • 1.  IT is my duty to record my sincere thanks and deep sense of gratitude to my respected teacher Mrs. SONU ma’am for her valuable guidance and constant encouraged for the fulfillment of this project. I also want to thank my all friends and my parents . Date – 20/06/2012 BY:- pooja sharma
  • 2.  This is to certify that Pooja Sharma of class- 9 has made the project “sustainable development “ under my supervision and guidance .  This project is original except that some ideas has been taken from English Book and from Internet also. She has made all her efforts for the completion of this project. Mrs. SONU SINGH {English TEACHER}
  • 3.  Agriculture has changed dramatically, especially since the end of World War II. Food and fiber productivity soared due to new technologies, mechanization, increased chemical use, specialization and government policies that favored maximizing production. These changes allowed fewer farmers with reduced labor demands to produce he majority of the food and fiber in the U.S.  A growing movement has emerged during the past two decades to question the role of the agricultural establishment in promoting practices that contribute to these social problems. Today this movement for sustainable agriculture is garnering increasing support and acceptance within mainstream agriculture. Not only does sustainable agriculture address many environmental and social concerns, but it offers innovative and economically viable opportunities for growers, laborers, consumers, policymakers and many others in the entire food system.
  • 4.  Sustainable agriculture integrates three main goals--environmental health, economic profitability, and social and economic equity. A variety of philosophies, policies and practices have contributed to these goals. People in many different capacities, from farmers to consumers, have shared this vision and contributed to it. Despite the diversity of people and perspectives, the following themes commonly weave through definitions of sustainable agriculture.
  • 5.  Water  Energy  Air  Soil
  • 6. • Agriculture Crops • Horticulture crops • Live stock - Cattle - Poultry - Pig - Horse - Donkey - Sheep & goats • Bee Keeping • Agro Forestry and Grasses • Fisheries 10
  • 7.  Sustainable production practices involve a variety of approaches. Specific strategies must take into account topography, soil characteristics, climate, pests, local availability of inputs and the individual grower's goals. Despite the site- specific and individual nature of sustainable agriculture: select appropriate management practices:  Selection of species and varieties that are well suited to the site and to conditions on the farm;  Diversification of crops (including livestock) and cultural practices to enhance the biological and economic stability of the farm;  Management of the soil to enhance and protect soil quality;  Efficient and humane use of inputs; and  Consideration of farmers' goals and lifestyle choices.
  • 8.  A common philospohy among sustainable agriculture practitioners is that a "healthy" soil is a key component of sustainability; that is, a healthy soil will produce healthy crop plants that have optimum vigor and are less susceptible to pests. While many crops have key pests that attack even the healthiest of plants, proper soil, water and nutrient management can help prevent some pest problems brought on by crop stress or nutrient imbalance. Furthermore, crop management sys and/or energy for tillage to maintain yields items that impair soil quality often result in greater inputs of water, nutrients, pesticides,
  • 9.  In the early part of this century, most farms integrated both crop and livestock operations. Indeed, the two were highly complementary both biologically and economically. The current picture has changed quite drastically since then. Crop and animal producers now are still dependent on one another to some degree, but the integration now most commonly takes place at a higher level--between farmers, through intermediaries, rather than within the farm itself. This is the result of a trend toward separation and specialization of crop and animal production systems. Despite this trend, there are still many farmers, particularly in the Midwest and Northeastern U.S. that integrate crop and animal systems--either on dairy farms, or with range cattle, sheep or hog operations.

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