VIETNAM and Pop Culture:
Then and Now
Nusret Çetin – Mert Özsoy – Onur Yalçın
 Throughout the Vietnam War, pop culture changed
drastically. With the rise of people who were counter-culture,
more of w...
1- Movies of Vietnam
The Vietnam War was the most visually
represented war in the history of the United
States. The films ...
"The first casualty of war is
innocence"
"The Horror. . . The Horror. . . "
Platoon(1986) – Apocalypse Now (1979)
Because ...
2- Television
Television played a prominent role during the Vietnam
War. The TV was a window looking out towards Vietnam
t...
 Today, and even after the war, television seemed to be
impacted by this war. For example, M*A*S*H*, a popular
television...
3- Music
 With all of the influence of the war affected U.S television,
movies, books, and even fashion it was inevitable...
 Even today, many songs in contemporary America are
protest songs. Green Day, who is a popular punk-rock band,
writes son...
4- Fashion
 The Vietnam War brought on a strong
surge of counter-culture in the United
States, from hobbies to popular mu...
 The conservative days of pearls
and well combed hair were over,
and in came tie dye, afros, and
oversized sweaters. Both...
 Hippies believed that by
separating themselves
from the traditional styles
and behaviors that were
once widely accepted ...
Works Consulted
 "Fashion." The Groovy 1960's. 27 Apr. 2007
<http://www.kidsnewsroom.org/elmer/infoCentral/frameset/dec
a...
of 12

Pop culture vietnam war

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Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pop culture vietnam war

  • 1. VIETNAM and Pop Culture: Then and Now Nusret Çetin – Mert Özsoy – Onur Yalçın
  • 2.  Throughout the Vietnam War, pop culture changed drastically. With the rise of people who were counter-culture, more of was seen in the media was reflected in pop culture. New fads began to grow in popularity, and more people began to wear more clothes that were less mainstream. Also, the effects of the Vietnam War could be seen on television, movies, and could be read in books.  The Vietnam War wasn’t only present on the news, but in U.S culture too. If you study the people and the entertainment of the time period, you will see that this war not only affected those who were fighting in it, but all of America.
  • 3. 1- Movies of Vietnam The Vietnam War was the most visually represented war in the history of the United States. The films produced in the Vietnam era were significant in the way that it made war movies that brutally depicted the war. While other war movies of the Korean War, World War I, and World War II were meant to boost the morale of the united States or to promote the necessary sacrifice or to bring the nation together to vilify the enemy, the movies of the Vietnam War were made to show the citizens at home what was truly going on in places were they could not see. The war movies that were made for the war before Vietnam were undoubtedly propaganda and therefore did not serve as a true informational tool for the American citizens
  • 4. "The first casualty of war is innocence" "The Horror. . . The Horror. . . " Platoon(1986) – Apocalypse Now (1979) Because movies about Vietnam such as “Apocalypse Now” and “Platoon” were expected to bring the viewers shock and horror towards the war, movies about Vietnam and other war movies now have risen to the Vietnam War movie standard.
  • 5. 2- Television Television played a prominent role during the Vietnam War. The TV was a window looking out towards Vietnam that anyone at home could look into. The television gave people the truth and first accounts of the war, and gave them a look into the war that wasn’t media controlled. Previously, the government would use propaganda, and would make up fiction, which led people to believe one thing when it would really be the other. Television was one of the aspects of the Vietnam War that made it unique and it was only a matter of time before a television show would appear that wasn’t the news. Television shows such as Tour of Duty and China Beach were related directly towards the Vietnam War. While “Tour of Duty” was about a platoon serving in the war, China Beach was set at a base for the army.
  • 6.  Today, and even after the war, television seemed to be impacted by this war. For example, M*A*S*H*, a popular television show on air between 1973-1982 depicted the Korean War. Although the wars were different, there were many parallels that viewers at home could make. Another, and more recent television show, That 70’s Show portrayed the life of six teenagers and their life in Wisconsin. These teens were a good example of the “free-loving” “druggies” hippies that existed during that time-period. They were not quite counter- culture revolutionaries, but they still provide comic relief to viewers at home. The Vietnam War is reflected in television yesterday and today.
  • 7. 3- Music  With all of the influence of the war affected U.S television, movies, books, and even fashion it was inevitable that American songwriters and singers would join the counter-culture movement. Protest Music reflected not only what that singer was feeling but also reflected the feelings of Americans. Artists such as The Beatles, Bruce Springsteen, and Elvis Presley wrote protest songs against the Vietnam War. There was even a two day concert that drew almost half a million people, Woodstock. These songs were against the war, and for most counter-culture revolutionaries they would listen to them religiously and the bands that played these songs were icons. Protest music was important for many of the people during that time period, and listening to this music reflected what most people felt during the Vietnam War.
  • 8.  Even today, many songs in contemporary America are protest songs. Green Day, who is a popular punk-rock band, writes songs that criticize U.S nation, U.S government, and the media that puts out wrong messages to Americans. Other bands include the Dixie Chicks, P!nk, and Neil Young. These songs, similar to hose during the Vietnam War, reflect their feelings against the war, and are protesting against U.S war in Iraq.
  • 9. 4- Fashion  The Vietnam War brought on a strong surge of counter-culture in the United States, from hobbies to popular music genres, and all the way to clothing styles. Rather than heading out to the movies on the weekends, teens and college students from across the country would spend their free time at protest marches, rallying against the war overseas. With this radical age of protest and rebellion came a new sense of fashion in America’s middle class
  • 10.  The conservative days of pearls and well combed hair were over, and in came tie dye, afros, and oversized sweaters. Both men and women alike began wearing their hair long, bell-bottoms, sandals, and love beads. Clothing retailers slowly began going out of business as more Americans started shopping at Army Surplus stores. Women were no longer concerned with wearing fancy dresses anymore; instead they opted for long peasant-style dresses and unisex t-shirts, silk- screened with anti-war slogans on them.
  • 11.  Hippies believed that by separating themselves from the traditional styles and behaviors that were once widely accepted in the United States, they could not be held responsible for what was happening in Vietnam. Their style of dress was just another way for them to separate themselves from the rest of America and show that they did not support the war.
  • 12. Works Consulted  "Fashion." The Groovy 1960's. 27 Apr. 2007 <http://www.kidsnewsroom.org/elmer/infoCentral/frameset/dec ade/1960.htm#Fashion>. Thomas, Pauline Weston. "The 60s Mini Skirt 1960s Fashion History." Fashion Era. Google. 27 Apr. 2007 <http://fashion- era.com/the_1960s_mini.htm>. "Fads and Fashion." American Cultural History. 30 Apr. 2007. <http://kclibrary.nhmccd.edu/decade60.html#fads>.  Anderegg, Michael. Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television. Philedelphia: Temple University Press, 1991. Thomson, Jeremy. "Platoon." http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091763/plotsummary  Gitlon, Todd. The sixties : years of hope, days of rage. New York : Bantam Books, 1987  Pictures: http://www.fiftiesweb.com/fashion/hippie-clothes.htm