Microsoft®
PowerPoint®
2010 Plain & Simple
Nancy Muir
Published with the authorization of Microsoft Corporation by:
O’Reilly Media, Inc.
1005 Gravenstein Highway North
Sebastop...
To Ebb
  v
Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
vi  Contents
Creating Presentations 37
Creating a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Contents  vii
Managing and Viewing Slides 91
Viewing Slides in the Slide Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
viii  Contents
Formatting Text, Objects, and Slides 143
Applying Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Contents  ix
Running a Presentation 195
Starting and Ending a Slide Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
  xi
Acknowledgments
Thanks to Ken Brown of O’Reilly Media for leading the charge on this title, and to Juliana Aldous
of ...
In this section:
  1
In this section:
About This Book
If you are the typical PowerPoint user, you lead a hectic life,
whet...
No Computerese!
With a presentation deadline staring you in the face, the last
thing you want is a lengthy lecture. You ne...
Sections 4, 5, 6, and 7 start you out building the text
portion of a presentation by adding text to individual slides
in a...
What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
If you worked with PowerPoint 2007, you already know about
the ribbon, a set of tools that ...
In this section:
  5
In this section:
What’s New in
PowerPoint 2010?
If you are making the move from Microsoft Office Powe...
What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010?
PowerPoint 2010 uses a central ribbon of tools that
you access on various tabs. The tools...
Using the Ribbon
The ribbon is your control central in PowerPoint 2010. The
default ribbon consists of nine tabs, although...
4 Click the Insert tab.
5 Click Shapes, and then click an item in
the Shapes gallery. Click anywhere on
the slide, and t...
3 Click General.
4 Click the ScreenTip Style drop-down arrow,
and choose one of the following settings:
• Show Feature ...
Using Microsoft Office Backstage
In PowerPoint 2010, the File tab takes you
to a new command central for your docu-
ments,...
Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools
PowerPoint 2010 has easy-to-use picture formatting tools and
new ...
3 Click any picture in the Pictures
folder, and then click the Open
button. (Use files in the Sample Pic-
tures folder if...
Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt
In PowerPoint 2010, graphics are displayed in galleries that help
you b...
5 Click the Colors button, and then
move your mouse pointer over the
sets of colors to see previews on your
slides. Click...
Explore SmartArt
1 Click the Insert tab.
2 Click SmartArt to open the Choose A
SmartArt Graphic dialog box.
3 Click a c...
Copying Effects with Animation
Painter
Animation Painter is a feature that’s new to
PowerPoint 2010. If you’ve used Format...
Working with Slide Sections
Sections are a new feature in PowerPoint
2010 that allow you to divide up larger
presentations...
Broadcasting Slide Shows
When you broadcast a presentation, you make it available as a
live presentation that others can v...
4 In the Broadcast Slide Show dialog
box, click the Start Broadcast button.
Enter your user ID and password if
requested...
In this section:
  21
In this section:
Getting Started
with PowerPoint
2010
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 sports the user inte...
What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010?
PowerPoint 2010 provides a central ribbon of tools that you
access on various tabs. The t...
You access the File menu by clicking the File tab. Here you can
choose several common file commands or click the Options
c...
Using the Ribbon
Display Tabs and Panes
1 Click the Review tab.
2 Click Research to open the
Research pane.
3 Click the...
4 Click the Insert tab.
5 Click the Shapes button, and then
click an item in the Shapes group.
Click anywhere on the sl...
Show or Hide Enhanced ScreenTips
1 Choose Options from the File menu.
2 Click General.
3 Click the ScreenTip Style drop...
Working with the Mini Toolbar
Everybody who has ever worked on any kind of document,
from a word-processed letter to a Pow...
The Mini toolbar is somewhat translucent when you first select
text; you have to move your pointer to it to get a solid im...
Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar
Although you can add many tools to the tool-
bar, don’t overdo it. Only add the tools...
2 Click Quick Access Toolbar.
3 In the Choose Commands From list,
click the arrow and select a category
of tools, or sim...
Remove or Rearrange Tools
1 Choose Options from the File menu.
2 Click Quick Access Toolbar.
3 Click an item in the lis...
Working with Design Elements
Several features introduced in PowerPoint 2007 relate to how
graphics are displayed and creat...
5 Click the Home tab, and then click
the arrow on the Font list.
6 Move your mouse pointer down the
list of fonts. You c...
Get a Cohesive Look with Themes
1 Click the Design tab.
2 Click the down arrow to the right of
the Themes gallery. The g...
Work with SmartArt
1 Click the Insert tab.
2 Click the SmartArt button to open
the Choose A SmartArt Graphic
dialog box....
In this section:
  37
In this section:
Creating
Presentations
When you start a new job, you typically spend the first day
...
Creating a Presentation
PowerPoint offers a few options for how you get started with a
new presentation. For example, if y...
Open a Presentation Based on an
Existing Presentation
1 With PowerPoint running, choose New
from the File menu to display...
Open a Template
1 With PowerPoint running, choose New from
the File menu to display the New Presentation
window.
2 If yo...
Finding and Opening Existing Presentations
Very often, you use several work sessions to complete a pres­
entation. Perhaps...
Slide Show view
Moving Among Views
PowerPoint 2010 offers several views that let you focus on dif-
ferent aspects of your ...
Normal view
View tab Slide Sorter View
Normal Slide Show
Slide Sorter
Reading View
Finding and Opening Existing Presentati...
You do most of your work building your presentation in
Normal view. It consists of three panes: the Slides/Outline pane
gi...
Close and Redisplay the Slides/
Outline Pane
1 Click the Close button on the Slides/
Outline pane to hide it.
2 Click No...
Viewing Multiple Slides with
Slide Sorter
After you create several slides, you might want
to take your focus off an indivi...
Running a Presentation in Slide Show View
Slide Show is the view you use to run your presentation in full-
screen mode. If...
End a Slide Show
1 With a presentation in Slide Show
view, press Esc on your keyboard to
end the slide show and return to...
Saving and Closing a PowerPoint
Presentation
As you work on a presentation, you should save
it periodically so that you do...
Close a Presentation
1 Click the Save button to be sure that
all changes have been saved.
2 Click the Close button to cl...
Getting Help
PowerPoint 2010 includes both offline Help, in the form of a
searchable database of information, and online H...
In this section:
  53
In this section:
Working with
Slide Masters
One of the hallmarks of a good presentation is a uniform...
Master Layout thumbnail Master footer
Master graphic
Slide Master view
Slide Master tab
Individual slide
Footer from maste...
Making Changes to a Slide Master
Within Slide Master view, you can work with font formats and
bullet list styles, insert t...
Insert Footer Information
1 With Slide Master view displayed,
click a footer placeholder to select it.
Note that one pla...
Work with Master Graphics
1 With the slide master displayed, select the
layout on which you want to place the graphic
(fo...
Add a Layout
1 With Slide Master view displayed, click the
Slide Master tab, and choose Insert Layout.
2 On the new Cust...
Omit Master Graphics on Individual
Slides
1 With the slide displayed in Normal
view, click the Design tab on the
ribbon.
...
Adding and Deleting Master Sets
You can apply multiple themes to a single presentation. A set
of master layouts is created...
Delete a Master
1 With Slide Master view displayed,
click the Master Layout slide for the
master you want to delete.
2 C...
Insert Additional Masters
1 To insert a blank master, with Slide
Master view displayed, click the Slide
Master tab, and t...
1
3
Working with Handout and Notes Masters
Handouts are essentially a printing option for PowerPoint. You
can print one, t...
4 6 5 7
4 Click Slides Per Page, and choose an
option from the gallery.
5 Click Background Styles, and choose
a backgrou...
Work with Notes Master
1 On the View tab, click Notes Master
in the Master Views group.
2 Click in a placeholder and ent...
6 Click to choose a background for the
handouts from the Background Styles
gallery.
7 Click the tools in the Edit Theme...
In this section:
  67
In this section:
Building a
Presentation
Although a presentation can contain text, graphics, anima-
...
New Slide button
Placeholder with
centered text
Outline created when
you enter text
Placeholder with
fill color
Slide cont...
Building a Slide
When you open a blank presentation,
­PowerPoint provides you with one blank
title slide. A title slide co...
Enter Text on Slides
1 Click a title placeholder.
2 Type your text, and then click any-
where outside the placeholder.
3...
Insert a Symbol
1 Click in a placeholder where you want to
insert a symbol.
2 Click the Insert tab.
3 Click Symbol.
4 ...
Insert the Date and Time
1 Click the placeholder where you want
to insert the date and time.
2 Click the Insert tab.
3 ...
Working with Text
Most of us aren’t letter perfect the first time
we write something. We need to go back and
make changes ...
Undo and Redo an Action
1 After performing an action such as
typing, formatting, or moving an
object, click the Undo [Act...
Cut, Copy, and Paste Text
1 Click the Home tab.
2 Click the placeholder you want to
copy, or drag to select text if you
...
Finding and Replacing Text
Often when you create a presentation, you need to change
every instance of a word or phrase. Fo...
Manipulating Placeholders
Use the Selection And Visibility Pane
1 Display the slide you want to work on in
Normal view, a...
3 In the Selection And Visibility pane,
do any of the following:
• Click an item in the Shapes On This
Slide list to sel...
Align Placeholder Contents
1 Click the placeholder containing the
text you want to align, and then click
the Home tab.
2	...
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Transcripts - [Nancy muir] microsoft_power_point_2010_plain__sim(bookzz.org)

  • 1. Microsoft® PowerPoint® 2010 Plain & Simple Nancy Muir
  • 2. Published with the authorization of Microsoft Corporation by: O’Reilly Media, Inc. 1005 Gravenstein Highway North Sebastopol, California 95472 Copyright © 2010 by The Publishing Studio, Inc. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without express written permission of O’Reilly Media, Inc. Printed and bound in the United States of America. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 WCT 5 4 3 2 1 0 Microsoft Press titles may be purchased for educational, business or sales promotional use. Online editions are also available for most titles (http://my.safaribooksonline.com). For more information, contact our corporate/institutional sales department: (800) 998-9938 or corporate@ oreilly.com. Visit our website at microsoftpress.oreilly.com. Send comments to mspinput@microsoft.com. Microsoft, Microsoft Press, ActiveX, Excel, FrontPage, Internet Explorer, PowerPoint, SharePoint, Webdings, Windows, and Windows 7 are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred. This book expresses the author’s views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided without any express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the author, O’Reilly Media, Inc., Microsoft Corporation, nor their respective resellers or distributors, will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly by such information. Acquisitions and Developmental Editor: Kenyon Brown Production Editor: Rachel Monaghan Editorial Production: Online Training Solutions, Inc. Technical Reviewer: George Cain, Box Twelve Communications, Inc. Indexer: Potomac Indexing, LLC Compositor: Ron Bilodeau Illustrator: Robert Romano 978-0-735-62728-4
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  • 4.   v Contents Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi About This Book 1 No Computerese! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A Quick Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 A Few Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Final Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010? 5 What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Using the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Using Microsoft Office Backstage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Copying Effects with Animation Painter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Working with Slide Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Broadcasting Slide Shows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010 21 What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Using the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Working with the Mini Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Working with Design Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 1 2 3
  • 5. vi  Contents Creating Presentations 37 Creating a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Finding and Opening Existing Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Sizing Panes in Normal View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Viewing Multiple Slides with Slide Sorter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Running a Presentation in Slide Show View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Working with Slide Masters 53 Making Changes to a Slide Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Adding and Deleting Master Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Working with Handout and Notes Masters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Building a Presentation 67 Understanding How to Build a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Building a Slide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Working with Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Finding and Replacing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Manipulating Placeholders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Building a Presentation Outline 81 Understanding the Relationship of the Outline to Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Working with the Outline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Adding Text in the Outline Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Working with Outline Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 4 5 6 7
  • 6. Contents  vii Managing and Viewing Slides 91 Viewing Slides in the Slide Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Managing Slides in Slide Sorter View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Hiding and Unhiding Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Working with Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Using Slide Layouts and Themes 103 Understanding What Slide Layouts and Themes Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Working with Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Working with Themes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Changing Theme Colors and Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Inserting Media and Drawing Objects 113 Working with Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Editing Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Creating and Modifying Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Inserting Clip Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Creating WordArt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Working with SmartArt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Working with Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Inserting Media Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Creating a Photo Album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Drawing Shapes and Text Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 8 9 10
  • 7. viii  Contents Formatting Text, Objects, and Slides 143 Applying Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Formatting Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Formatting Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Resizing Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Rotating and Flipping Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Grouping and Changing the Order of Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Working with Picture Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Using Video Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Changing the Slide Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Adding Transitions and Animations 167 Applying a Transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Adding Sound to a Transition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Modifying Transition Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Choosing How to Advance a Slide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Applying a Custom Animation to an Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Using Animation Painter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Previewing an Animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Finalizing Your Slide Show 179 Reviewing Your Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Setting Up a Slide Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Rehearsing Your Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Taking a Presentation with You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 11 12 13
  • 8. Contents  ix Running a Presentation 195 Starting and Ending a Slide Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Navigating Through Slides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Working with the Pen and Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Switching to Another Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Printing a Presentation 207 Inserting Headers and Footers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Using Print Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Establishing Printer Settings and Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Sharing a Presentation on the Web 217 Saving a Presentation to the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Saving as a PDF File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Broadcasting a Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Creating a Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Introducing Advanced PowerPoint Topics 227 Saving Your Own PowerPoint Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Removing Hidden Data with Document Inspector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Adding a Digital Signature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Customizing the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 14 15 16 17
  • 9.   xi Acknowledgments Thanks to Ken Brown of O’Reilly Media for leading the charge on this title, and to Juliana Aldous of Microsoft Press for signing me up to work on the book originally. Also, my gratitude to Rachel Monaghan at O’Reilly for coordinating various production aspects of the book, and to George Cain for his able technical editing and John Pierce for the great job copy editing the book.
  • 10. In this section:   1 In this section: About This Book If you are the typical PowerPoint user, you lead a hectic life, whether you spend time running from meeting to meeting and conference to conference or from the soccer match to a volun- teer committee meeting. If so, this book is for you. In Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 Plain & Simple, you get an easy-to-use refer- ence that helps you get to work immediately. My goals are to help you start building presentations right away and to provide you with information about all sorts of tools and features you can use to create more sophisticated presentations over time. This book is based on Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 installed on the Windows 7 operating system, but if you have an earlier version of Windows (preferably Windows XP or Windows Vista with available service packs installed), you’ll find that most things work just the same. The great new features that PowerPoint 2010 introduces make your work easier to handle and offer some powerful visual tools for your presentations. 1 ■■ No Computerese! ■■ A Quick Overview ■■ A Few Assumptions ■■ What’s New in PowerPoint 2010? ■■ The Final Word
  • 11. No Computerese! With a presentation deadline staring you in the face, the last thing you want is a lengthy lecture. You need to find out how to accomplish something quickly. This book is structured task by task to help you find what you need help with now and to keep you moving. No task in this book makes you read more than two pages to find an answer to your question. Look up what you need to do in the table of contents or index, follow the steps in the task, and you’re done. I don’t spend lots of time on elaborate explanations, and you don’t need a technical dic- tionary by your side to understand the steps I describe. Occasionally, you encounter a See Also element that refers you to a related task simply because some functions overlap each other. You can also find tips here and there that provide advice. Finally, the Try This feature gives you ideas for how to put PowerPoint to use, and Caution elements warn you of potential problems. But the main focus of this book is to keep you on track, providing the information you need quickly and simply. Just Essential Tasks The tasks in this book are organized logically for the types of things you do in PowerPoint 2010. If you’ve never built a pre- sentation, you can start at the beginning and work your way through to create your first slide show. But you don’t have to move through the book in order. If you know exactly what you want to accomplish, just find that task and go to it! And the Easiest Way to Do Them Although PowerPoint 2010 often gives you several ways to get things done, I’ve tried to suggest the easiest way to get results. The PowerPoint user interface (what you see on the screen) introduced in PowerPoint 2007 and carried on in Pow- erPoint 2010 has gotten rid of some methods you might be used to, such as using menus and toolbars for most tasks, but keyboard shortcuts and contextual toolbars (tools that appear when you perform a certain type of task) are still available to address different styles of working. I encourage you to explore the user interface and Help system to find other ways of get- ting things done after you master the basics. A Quick Overview Although you don’t have to read this book from front to back (in fact, you probably won’t), it’s useful to understand how I’ve structured it so that you can find your way around. After you install PowerPoint 2010 (an easy task because the Microsoft Office installer guides you through step by step), you can begin exploring any of the following sections and their individual tasks. Sections 2 and 3 introduce you to what’s new in PowerPoint 2010 and the PowerPoint user interface and explain how you move around and work with tools and views in the program. 2  No Computerese!
  • 12. Sections 4, 5, 6, and 7 start you out building the text portion of a presentation by adding text to individual slides in a graphical environment, by using slide masters (tools that allow you to quickly and easily make changes to global design and text settings that apply to all your slides, handouts, or notes pages), and by entering information into a familiar out- line format. You also learn essential information such as how to open and save a presentation and how to get help. You become acquainted with placeholders on slides, which can contain either text or objects, and begin to understand how you build a presentation slide by slide and view the results. Sections 8, 9, 10, and 11 are where you begin to look at the overall look and feel of slides in various views. You also work with the design aspect of your presentation, using vari- ous layouts (different combinations of placeholders and con- tent) and themes that contain color and graphical elements. You work with inserting and handling various objects, such as clip art, WordArt, videos, and pictures. These sections also provide valuable information on how to format text and other objects in your presentation so that it looks polished and professional. Sections 12 and 13 take you near to your goal of a final presentation by providing information about slick animations and transitions that you can add to your slides to bring them to life. You also learn about how to set up your show to run as you want it to and how to rehearse, proof, and generally ensure that your presentation is letter perfect. Sections 14, 15, and 16 help you actually give your pres­ entation to others, either by running it in person, printing out hard copies of it, sharing it via e-mail, or publishing it to the Web. This is what all the rest of the work is for, and if you do your job right, you can provide a well-written and well- designed presentation to your audience. Finally, Section 17 offers information about a few more advanced tools in PowerPoint 2010 that you might want to explore after you master the basics. Among other things, you discover how to work with presentation templates to save you time, create custom shows from your larger presenta- tion, customize tools on the ribbon tabs, and even work with PowerPoint presentations from your cell phone. A Few Assumptions When you write a book, you have to first think about your readers. Who are they, what do they already know, and what do they need to know? In writing this book, I’ve assumed that you are essentially computer literate—you know how to turn your computer on and off, what a mouse is and how to click and double-click items with it, and how to select text or objects. I also assume that you have worked with some kind of software and have at least a passing acquaintance with tool buttons, dialog boxes, and software menus made up of vari- ous commands. Whether you use your computer every day in a high- powered job or spend most of your computer time playing games and writing notes to friends, I assume you have an Internet connection and have been on the Internet. Other than that, this book tries to provide all the steps you need to accomplish the tasks within it in a straightforward way—with plenty of graphics to help you see what I’m talking about. A Few Assumptions  3 About This Book
  • 13. What’s New in PowerPoint 2010? If you worked with PowerPoint 2007, you already know about the ribbon, a set of tools that you access on tabs. One major change to that interface in PowerPoint 2010 is the addition of the Office Backstage view, which contains commands and options that you used to work with through the Office button but that you now access through the File tab. If you only used Office programs prior to Office 2007, you need to become familiar with the ribbon. These tools occa- sionally offer galleries of choices, and when you move your mouse over these choices, they are previewed on your slides before you apply them. Sometimes when you work on certain functions, specialized tabs appear; for example, if you select a drawing object, the Drawing Tools, Format tab appears. PowerPoint 2010 offers improvements to visual elements, including better picture and video formatting tools, and addi- tional themes and SmartArt choices. Finally, PowerPoint 2010 offers more features for sharing presentations with others and broadcasting slide shows on the Internet. I think you’ll like what you see once you absorb the changes. PowerPoint 2010 is all about making the tools you work with accessible and obvious. The Final Word This book is designed to make your learning painless, with plenty of visual information to help you pick things up at a glance, along with easy-to-follow steps. My goals are to give you what you need, make tasks easy to find and understand, and help you have fun learning to work with ­PowerPoint 2010, which is a great design tool that helps you communicate more effectively. I hope you find the tasks in this book helpful and that you are producing award-winning presentations in no time. 4  What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 14. In this section:   5 In this section: What’s New in PowerPoint 2010? If you are making the move from Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2003 to PowerPoint 2010, you’ll find that it sports an interface that offers a somewhat different way of getting things done. After investing a little time getting used to the new tools and features, you’ll find that this version of PowerPoint is actually easier to use, although you have a small learning curve to go through. If you worked with PowerPoint 2007, you’ve got a head start on this new look and approach to getting things done. This section is where you get your first look at PowerPoint 2010, discovering where various tools and settings reside and learning how to use the newest features, such as the File tab and Office Backstage. Other than the selections offered through the File tab, which provides file-management commands such as New, Open, Save, and Print, most features are available as buttons on tabs on the ribbon. In some cases, panes are displayed, such as the Research or the Clip Art pane. Galleries of graphical selections allow you to preview how effects look on your slides or objects before you apply them, and several enhanced galleries and formatting options are available to explore in PowerPoint 2010. Finally, in this section I introduce you to new features, such as sections, Animation Painter, and broadcasting slide shows. 2 ■■ What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? ■■ Using the Ribbon ■■ Using Microsoft Office Backstage ■■ Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools ■■ Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt ■■ Copying Effects with Animation Painter ■■ Working with Slide Sections ■■ Broadcasting Slide Shows
  • 15. What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? PowerPoint 2010 uses a central ribbon of tools that you access on various tabs. The tools on the tabs are broken into groups. In addition, the Quick Access Toolbar lets you place your favorite tools in one location and access functions that aren’t offered through the ribbon. Some tools on the ribbon dis- play drop-down galleries of selections, and others open dialog boxes for making detailed settings. You access the File menu by clicking the File tab. Here you can use several common file commands or click the Options command to see a wealth of set- ting options that control the way PowerPoint—and you—work. Tab Contextual tabGallery Ribbon Dialog box launcher Group File tab File menu Options 6  What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 16. Using the Ribbon The ribbon is your control central in PowerPoint 2010. The default ribbon consists of nine tabs, although contextual tabs appear now and then when you work with certain types of objects or functions. The Add-Ins tab appears if you install third-party programs and features, such as Microsoft ­PowerPoint Presenter Tools, or a tool like the one I used to capture the screen shots for this book. Display Tabs and Panes 1 Click the Review tab. 2 Click Research to open the Research pane. 3 Click the Close button to close the pane. ScreenTip2 1 3 You can open dialog boxes associated with groups of tools by clicking the dialog box launcher, a small arrow at the bottom-right corner of many groups on the ribbon. This displays all settings and features related to that category of functions, including some not shown on the ribbon. Try This! Using the Ribbon  7 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 17. 4 Click the Insert tab. 5 Click Shapes, and then click an item in the Shapes gallery. Click anywhere on the slide, and then drag to draw the shape. 6 Note that the Drawing Tools, Format tab appears. This is a contextual tab. 1 2 4 65 The Add-Ins tab is where you can add programs or features that are not part of PowerPoint. You include add-in programs here by using the Options command on the File menu. For exam- ple, you can include additional presenter tools or presentation notes tools as add-ins. Tip Show or Hide Enhanced ScreenTips 1 Click the File tab to open the File menu. 2 Click Options. Can’t find a tool? Some tools, such as Preview As A Web Page, are not on the ribbon. In this case, you have to add the tools to the Quick Access Toolbar to perform the function. See the task “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” on page 29 for more about how to do this. Tip 8  Using the Ribbon
  • 18. 3 Click General. 4 Click the ScreenTip Style drop-down arrow, and choose one of the following settings: • Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips, which displays larger ScreenTips with the tool button name and an explanation of its function. • Don’t Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips, which displays only the tool button name. • Don’t Show ScreenTips, which dis- plays neither enhanced nor standard ScreenTips. 5 Click OK. 6 Place your pointer over a button on the ribbon, and the appropriate setting takes effect. (Here you see the effects of using the Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips setting.) 3 5 4 6 When you display either type of ScreenTip, key- board shortcuts for tool button functions are displayed (when they exist). For example, if you place your pointer over the Paste button, you see Ctrl+V in parentheses after the tool name in the ScreenTip. You can use this keyboard com- bination to paste an item instead of clicking the button. Tip Using the Ribbon  9 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 19. Using Microsoft Office Backstage In PowerPoint 2010, the File tab takes you to a new command central for your docu- ments, called Microsoft Office Backstage. This change to the Office interface in Office 2010 makes accessing often-used settings and activities such as opening, printing, and saving or publishing files easier to do using a panel of options. Display the File Menu 1 Click the File tab to open the File menu. 2 Click any of the categories on the left to display detailed settings in a pane on the right. 3 Use various check boxes or settings to change the way PowerPoint functions. 4 Some choices open a dialog box in which you click OK to save changed settings. 1 2 3 Commands located on the File tab in ­PowerPoint 2010 (an area referred to as Office Backstage) are accessed via the Office button in PowerPoint 2007. From the File menu, you can make many settings that determine how certain functions in PowerPoint work, open or create documents, save files, get help, and print or publish your presentation. Tip 10  Using Microsoft Office Backstage
  • 20. Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools PowerPoint 2010 has easy-to-use picture formatting tools and new video formatting tools. These tools provide galleries of effects, such as a variety of contrast or color settings, for you to choose from. Here you get a look at a couple of galleries used for working with pictures. For more about working with video tools, see Section 11, “Formatting Text, Objects, and Slides,” starting on page 143. Explore the Artistic Effects and Corrections Galleries 1 Click the Insert tab. 2 Click Picture. 2 1 The Format tab displays different tools if you insert a video. Try inserting a video from the sample video library by clicking the Insert tab and then clicking the Video button. Explore the tools available on this tab. You can learn more about these in the task “Using Video Tools,” on page 162. Try This! Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools   11 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 21. 3 Click any picture in the Pictures folder, and then click the Open button. (Use files in the Sample Pic- tures folder if you have none of your own.) 4 Click the Picture Tools, Format tab if it’s not displayed. 5 Click the Artistic Effects button, and move your mouse pointer over the various effects to see them previewed on your picture object. Do the same thing with the Corrections button. 6 Click an effect to apply it. 3 5 46 12  Working with Improved Picture and Video Formatting Tools
  • 22. Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt In PowerPoint 2010, graphics are displayed in galleries that help you browse through different styles and preview how each would look in your presentation. Built-in themes and SmartArt (used to insert workflow and process charts) are designed to give your presentation visual interest. Get a Cohesive Look with Themes 1 Click the Design tab. 2 Click the More arrow to the right of the Themes group to open the Themes gallery. 3 Move your mouse pointer over the various themes. Each in turn is pre- viewed on your slide presentation. 4 Click a theme to apply it your entire presentation. 1 43 You can modify a theme by selecting a different color, font, or effect set on the Design tab. Even if you experiment with dif- ferent combinations, by using these preset design elements you can keep consistency in the various design features of your slides. Try This! For more information about working with themes and other design elements, see Section 9, “Using Slide Layouts and Themes,” starting on page 103. See Also Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt  13 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 23. 5 Click the Colors button, and then move your mouse pointer over the sets of colors to see previews on your slides. Click a color scheme to apply it. 5 Themes were introduced in PowerPoint 2007, and Microsoft offers the option of expanding your theme horizons by visiting Office Online at www.office.microsoft.com. Office Online offers additional looks for your presentation that can give it extra visual excitement. Tip See Section 10, “Inserting Media and Drawing Objects,“ start- ing on page 113, for more about working with SmartArt objects as well as tables and various kinds of drawn objects. See Also 14  Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt
  • 24. Explore SmartArt 1 Click the Insert tab. 2 Click SmartArt to open the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. 3 Click a category of SmartArt in the list on the left. 4 Click an item in the gallery of SmartArt to select it. 5 Click OK. The SmartArt object appears on the slide. 6 Click in the Type Your Text Here box, and type your text. 5 421 3 6 Look at the preview of SmartArt in the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. Beneath it is a suggestion of uses for that particular SmartArt element to best communicate your message. Tip Taking Advantage of Additional Themes and SmartArt  15 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 25. Copying Effects with Animation Painter Animation Painter is a feature that’s new to PowerPoint 2010. If you’ve used Format Painter, which allows you to copy formats such as font and font color from one piece of text to another, you’ll understand how Animation Painter works. Animation Painter copies animation effects from one object to another, saving you the work of applying those effects time after time. Animations with Animation Painter 1 Click on an object that has an animation applied to it to select it. 2 Click the Animations tab. 3 Click Animation Painter. 4 Click on another object to copy all ­animation effects from the first object to the second. 1 2 3 4 For more about working with Animation Painter, see the task “Using Animation Painter” on page 176. See Also 16  Copying Effects with Animation Painter
  • 26. Working with Slide Sections Sections are a new feature in PowerPoint 2010 that allow you to divide up larger presentations so that you can find mate- rial more easily, something like headings in a long report. When you create a section and name it, its name appears in a bar that separates the slides within the section from others in the presentation. You can expand or collapse sections, as well. Add a Section 1 Click the Slide Sorter view button. 2 Click to the left of the first slide in the new section. 3 Click Section on the Home tab, and then choose Add Section. 1 3 2 Section indicator See “Working with Sections” on page 99 for more about working with slide sections. See Also Working with Slide Sections  17 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 27. Broadcasting Slide Shows When you broadcast a presentation, you make it available as a live presentation that others can view using their Web brows- ers. The process is simple, doesn’t require you to have your own site to host the presentation, and is an excellent way to give a live presentation to remote viewers. Start a Broadcast 1 Click the File tab. 2 Click Save & Send. 3 Click the Broadcast Slide Show link, and then click the Broadcast Slide Show button that appears. 1 2 3 Once you initiate and invite people to a broad- cast, you can run the broadcast online. See Sec- tion 16, “Sharing a Presentation on the Web,” starting on page 217, for more about working with broadcasting presentations. See Also 18  Broadcasting Slide Shows
  • 28. 4 In the Broadcast Slide Show dialog box, click the Start Broadcast button. Enter your user ID and password if requested, and click OK. (If you don’t have a Windows Live account, you can go to www.WindowsLive.com and sign up for one or, for more informa- tion on this feature, see Section 16, “Sharing a Presentation on the Web,” starting on page 217.) 5 In the next dialog box that appears, click the Start Broadcast button to use the default PowerPoint Broadcast Service. 6 Click Copy Link to copy the Web address and paste it into an e-mail invitation yourself, or click Send In Email to simply open an e-mail mes- sage and send the link. 5 6 Broadcasting Slide Shows  19 What’s New in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 29. In this section:   21 In this section: Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010 Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 sports the user interface introduced in PowerPoint 2007—with some slight changes. This interface offers a way of getting things done that’s somewhat different from versions of PowerPoint prior to Microsoft Office 2007. After invest- ing a little time getting used to the new tools and features, you’ll find that this version of PowerPoint is actually easier to use. This section is where you get your first look at PowerPoint 2010, discovering where various tools and settings reside and learning how to use features such as the ribbon and the galleries of design styles. PowerPoint 2010 has only a single menu, the File menu, which you display by clicking the File tab. (In PowerPoint 2007, this menu was opened by using the Office button.) Other than the File menu, which offers file-management commands such as New, Open, Save, and Print, most features are available as but- tons on tabs on the ribbon. In some cases, you work with panes, such as the Research pane, which are essentially like task panes in PowerPoint 2003. Galleries of graphical selections allow you to preview how effects look on your slides or objects before you apply them. Finally, PowerPoint includes a few contextual tools that appear only when needed. 3 ■■ What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? ■■ Using the Ribbon ■■ Working with the Mini Toolbar ■■ Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar ■■ Working with Design Elements
  • 30. What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010? PowerPoint 2010 provides a central ribbon of tools that you access on various tabs. The tools on the tabs are broken into groups. In addition, the Quick Access Toolbar lets you place your favorite tools in one location and access functions that aren’t offered through the ribbon. Some tools on the ribbon offer drop-down galleries of selections, and other tools open dialog boxes for making detailed settings. Tabs Gallery Ribbon Dialog box launcher Group 22  What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010?
  • 31. You access the File menu by clicking the File tab. Here you can choose several common file commands or click the Options command to see a wealth of setting options that control the way PowerPoint—and you—work. File tab Options command File menu Contextual tab What’s Where in PowerPoint 2010?  23 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 32. Using the Ribbon Display Tabs and Panes 1 Click the Review tab. 2 Click Research to open the Research pane. 3 Click the Close button to close the pane. 2 1 3 The ribbon is your control central in PowerPoint 2010. The default ribbon consists of nine tabs, although contextual tabs appear now and then when you work with certain types of objects or functions. An additional tab, Add-Ins, appears if you install third-party programs and features, such as Microsoft PowerPoint Presenter Tools, or a tool like the one I used to cap- ture the screen shots for this book. The Add-Ins tab is where you can add programs or features that are not part of PowerPoint. You include add-in programs here by using the Options command on the File menu. For example, you can include additional presenter tools or presentation notes tools as add-ins. Tip 24  Using the Ribbon
  • 33. 4 Click the Insert tab. 5 Click the Shapes button, and then click an item in the Shapes group. Click anywhere on the slide, and then drag to draw the shape. 6 Note that the Drawing Tools, Format tab appears. This is a contextual tab. 4 5 6 You can open dialog boxes associated with groups of tools by clicking the dialog box launcher, the small arrow at the bottom-right corner of many groups on the ribbon. This dis- plays additional settings and features related to the ribbon functions. Try This! Can’t find a tool? Some tools, such as Preview As A Web Page, are not on the ribbon. In this case, you have to add the tools to the Quick Access Toolbar to perform the function. See the task “Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar” on page 29 for more about how to do this. Tip Using the Ribbon  25 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 34. Show or Hide Enhanced ScreenTips 1 Choose Options from the File menu. 2 Click General. 3 Click the ScreenTip Style drop-down arrow, and choose one of the follow- ing settings: • Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips displays larger ScreenTips with the tool button name and an explanation of its function. • Don’t Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips displays only the tool button name. • Don’t Show ScreenTips displays neither enhanced nor standard ScreenTips. 4 Click OK. 5 Place your mouse pointer over a button on the ribbon and the appro- priate setting takes effect. (Here you see the effects of choosing the Show Feature Descriptions In ScreenTips setting.) 1 2 3 5 When you display either type of ScreenTip, keyboard shortcuts for tool button functions are also displayed (when they exist). For example, if you move your mouse pointer over the Paste button, you see Ctrl+V in parentheses after the tool name in the ScreenTip. You can use this key- board combination to paste an item instead of clicking the button. Tip 26  Using the Ribbon
  • 35. Working with the Mini Toolbar Everybody who has ever worked on any kind of document, from a word-processed letter to a PowerPoint presentation, knows that formatting text is one of the most frequent tasks they perform. That is perhaps why Microsoft created the Mini toolbar. When you select text, a small floating toolbar appears right next to the text itself. You can easily click on tools such as Bold, Italic, or Font Size without having to move your mouse pointer up to the ribbon and back to the text again. Display the Mini Toolbar 1 Choose Options from the File menu. 2 Click General. 3 Select the Show Mini Toolbar On Selection check box. 4 Click OK. 1 4 2 3 Working with the Mini Toolbar  27 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 36. The Mini toolbar is somewhat translucent when you first select text; you have to move your pointer to it to get a solid image of the tool buttons on it. If you move the mouse pointer away from the toolbar, you have to select the text again to make the toolbar appear. Tip For more information about working with text formatting tools that appear both on the Home tab of the ribbon and on the Mini toolbar, see Section 11, “Format- ting Text, Objects, and Slides,” starting on page 143. See Also 5 Select text on a slide. The Mini tool- bar appears. 5 28  Working with the Mini Toolbar
  • 37. Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar Although you can add many tools to the tool- bar, don’t overdo it. Only add the tools you use most often, or add a tool to use a particular function and then remove it to clear clutter off the toolbar. Caution The idea behind the interface that Microsoft Office 2007 intro- duced is that the most commonly used tools are present on the ribbon rather than buried in dialog boxes, and the tools you use less often, though accessible, aren’t part of the main inter- face by default. Sometimes the only way to access a function you might have used in previous versions of PowerPoint is to place a command on the Quick Access Toolbar. By default this toolbar contains only the Save, Undo, and Redo commands, but you can add as many commands as you want. Add Buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar 1 Choose Options from the File menu. 1 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar  29 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 38. 2 Click Quick Access Toolbar. 3 In the Choose Commands From list, click the arrow and select a category of tools, or simply scroll down and choose the Commands Not In The Ribbon category. 4 Click a command in the list on the left, and then click the Add button to add it to the toolbar. Repeat this step for all the commands you want to add. 5 Click OK. 5 2 3 4 The tools are added to the toolbar. If you fill up your Quick Access Toolbar and want to put it back the way it was when you first installed PowerPoint, go to the PowerPoint Options dialog box, select Quick Access Toolbar, and click Reset. The default tool settings are restored. Tip You can use the same procedure to add tools to the ribbon, except that in step 2, you select Customize Ribbon instead of Quick Access Toolbar. However, I suggest that you avoid cus- tomizing the ribbon extensively because other people using your computer won’t be familiar with what you’ve done and Help files will reflect only the default ribbon settings, which could be confusing. Tip 30  Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar
  • 39. Remove or Rearrange Tools 1 Choose Options from the File menu. 2 Click Quick Access Toolbar. 3 Click an item in the list on the right. 4 Click Remove to remove it from the toolbar. 5 Click Move Up or Move Down to rearrange the tools. 6 Click OK to save your settings. 1 4 6 2 3 5 You can change the Quick Access Toolbar settings for just the currently opened document, not for all documents. When you are in the Quick Access Toolbar window in the PowerPoint Options dialog box, click the arrow on the Customize Quick Access Toolbar list and choose the name of the presentation for which you want to save the changes. Try This! If you want to add some space between sets of tools on the Quick Access Toolbar, simply click the item labeled <Separator> at the top of the list on the left of the Quick Access Toolbar window, and then click Add. Tip Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar  31 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 40. Working with Design Elements Several features introduced in PowerPoint 2007 relate to how graphics are displayed and created, so if you have worked only with older versions of PowerPoint, this section gives you a quick preview of those features. Galleries of graphical ele- ments help you browse through different styles and preview how each looks in your presentation. Themes and Quick Styles are designed to give your presentation a cohesive and consis- tent look with predesigned combinations of colors, graphics, and fonts. Finally, SmartArt is a feature that allows you to easily create various types of diagrams and add text to them. Preview Design Elements with Galleries 1 Click a placeholder on a slide, enter some text, and select the text. 2 Click the Format tab. 3 Click the More arrow at the bottom right of the WordArt Styles gallery. 4 Move your mouse pointer over vari- ous WordArt styles. You can see each style previewed on the selected text. Click a style to apply it. 41 2 Several galleries exist on tabs that don’t appear until you insert certain types of objects, such as pictures or drawings. Although the Format tab contains an Insert Shapes group, there is also a Shapes gallery on the Insert tab, which you can use to draw shapes on your slides when the Format tab isn’t available. Tip 32  Working with Design Elements
  • 41. 5 Click the Home tab, and then click the arrow on the Font list. 6 Move your mouse pointer down the list of fonts. You can see each font previewed on the selected text. Click a font to apply it. 6 5 You can preview font sizes on selected text. With text selected, click the arrow on the Font Size list and move your mouse pointer down the list of sizes. Each is previewed on your text. Try This! For more information about WordArt and other draw- ing objects, see Section 10, “Inserting Media and Drawing Objects,” starting on page 113. See Also Working with Design Elements  33 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 42. Get a Cohesive Look with Themes 1 Click the Design tab. 2 Click the down arrow to the right of the Themes gallery. The gallery scrolls to the next row. 3 Move your mouse pointer over the various themes. You see each one previewed on your slide presentation. 4 Click a theme to apply it to your entire presentation. 4 31 You can modify a theme by selecting a different color, font, or effect set on the Design tab. Even if you experiment with different combinations, by using these preset design elements you can keep consistency in the various design features of your slides. Try This! For more information about working with themes and other design elements, see Section 9, “Using Slide Layouts and Themes,” starting on page 103. See Also You can expand the Theme gallery to view all available themes rather than scrolling through line by line. Click the More button (a down arrow with a line above it) to expand the gallery. Tip 5 Click the Colors button and move your mouse pointer over the sets of colors to see them previewed on your slides. Click a color scheme to apply it. 5 34  Working with Design Elements
  • 43. Work with SmartArt 1 Click the Insert tab. 2 Click the SmartArt button to open the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. 3 Click a category of SmartArt in the list on the left. 4 Click an item in the gallery of SmartArt to select it. 5 Click OK. 6 Click in the Type Your Text Here box, and then type your text. 53 1 2 4 6 Look at the preview of SmartArt in the Choose A SmartArt Graphic dialog box. Beneath it is a suggestion of uses for that particular SmartArt element to best com- municate your message. Tip See Section 10 for more about working with SmartArt objects as well as tables and various kinds of drawn objects. See Also Working with Design Elements  35 Getting Started with PowerPoint 2010
  • 44. In this section:   37 In this section: Creating Presentations When you start a new job, you typically spend the first day getting acquainted with colleagues and finding your way around the office before you get to work. In the same way, whether you want to create a lengthy, elaborate, animated pres­ entation with sound and graphics or a simple presentation con- sisting of a bulleted list and a handful of slides, your first steps are to learn how to open a blank presentation and to understand the basic structure of a standard Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 presentation. You can open a blank presentation, open presentations you have previously created and saved, or create presentations based on templates that provide prebuilt design features. After you open a file, you can enter content for a presentation. Then, if you make changes, you need to know how to save those changes and close the presentation. As you wander around PowerPoint, you get to know the dif- ferent views you use to accomplish various tasks. When you open a presentation, it opens in Normal view, where you see three panes showing a slide/outline display, the current slide, and an area for notes. Slide Sorter view is where you go to organize slides. When you want to see your slide show in action, use Slide Show view. 4 ■■ Creating a Presentation ■■ Finding and Opening Existing Presentations ■■ Sizing Panes in Normal View ■■ Viewing Multiple Slides with Slide Sorter ■■ Running a Presentation in Slide Show View ■■ Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation ■■ Getting Help
  • 45. Creating a Presentation PowerPoint offers a few options for how you get started with a new presentation. For example, if you want a single blank slide with the default layout and design elements, you can open a blank presentation. But if you want to get a head start on your presentation, consider basing it on an existing presentation that contains some elements you want to reuse or applying one of the templates that come with PowerPoint. Open a Blank Presentation 1 With PowerPoint running, choose New from the File menu to display the New Presentation window. 2 Click Create to open a new presentation based on the default Blank Presentation template. 1 2 If you’re more comfortable using a keyboard shortcut to open a file, you can. Simply press Ctrl+O to display the Open dialog box or Ctrl+N to open a new blank presentation. You should note, however, that keyboard shortcuts are not displayed on the File menu in PowerPoint 2010, as they are in some previous versions. Tip 38  Creating a Presentation
  • 46. Open a Presentation Based on an Existing Presentation 1 With PowerPoint running, choose New from the File menu to display the New ­Presentation window. 2 Click New From Existing. 3 Click the items in the navigation pane of the dialog box that appears to browse the drives and folders of your computer or network. 4 Double-click a folder to open it. Continue to double-click folders in the right pane until you find the file you want. 5 Click the document file to select it. 6 Click Create New to open a new presen- tation based on the presentation you selected. 21 3 4 5 6 For information about saving files, see “Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation” on page 49. See Also Be sure to save the file you just created to preserve its con- tents. Be sure to save it with a name different from the file it is based on to ensure that you don’t overwrite the original file. Tip Creating a Presentation  39 Creating Presentations
  • 47. Open a Template 1 With PowerPoint running, choose New from the File menu to display the New Presentation window. 2 If you are online, you can click the Presenta- tions category in the Office.com Templates area of the window to display categories of templates available from Office Online. 3 Click a category, select a template, and then click the Download button to download the template. 4 If you don’t want to use an online template, click Sample Templates to view the templates installed on your computer when you installed PowerPoint. 5 Click a template to see a preview on the right side of the window. 6 Click a template to select it, and then click Create. 1 4 2 63 If you previously saved a template, you can use the My Templates selection in the Available Templates And Themes list to locate and open one. Tip Any template you apply to your presentation is accessible by clicking Themes on the Design tab. For information about applying themes to slides, see “Apply a Slide Theme” on page 108. See Also 40  Creating a Presentation
  • 48. Finding and Opening Existing Presentations Very often, you use several work sessions to complete a pres­ entation. Perhaps you enter slide text in one sitting, tweak the arrangement of graphics and colors in another, and still later edit what you created to incorporate others’ feedback or to proof for spelling errors. To open an existing presentation, you can use the following steps. Open a Presentation 1 With PowerPoint running, choose Open from the File menu to display the Open dialog box. 2 Click in the navigation pane on the left to browse the drives and folders on your computer or network. 3 Double-click a folder to open it and display files in the right pane. Continue to double-click folders until you find the file you want. 4 You might need to specify the file type for the docu- ment you want to locate; All PowerPoint Presentations is the default format. Only documents saved in the specified file format are displayed in the file list. 5 Click a file, and then click Open. 2 3 5 4 You can use the buttons along the left of the Open dialog box to find a file more quickly. For example, if you just downloaded the file recently, click the Downloads button; if the file is stored in a shared folder on a network, click the Network button to locate it; and so on. Tip If you used a file recently, choose Recent from the File menu, and just click one of the listed files to open it. Tip Finding and Opening Existing Presentations  41 Creating Presentations
  • 49. Slide Show view Moving Among Views PowerPoint 2010 offers several views that let you focus on dif- ferent aspects of your presentation. Four of the views—Normal, Slide Sorter, Reading view, and Slide Show—can be accessed from buttons on the status bar located along the bottom of the PowerPoint window; another view, Notes Page, is accessed through the View tab. Note that these buttons do not appear when your presentation is in Slide Show view. You must exit the slide show to use them. You learn more about how each view is used in the following sections. 42  Finding and Opening Existing Presentations
  • 50. Normal view View tab Slide Sorter View Normal Slide Show Slide Sorter Reading View Finding and Opening Existing Presentations  43 Creating Presentations
  • 51. You do most of your work building your presentation in Normal view. It consists of three panes: the Slides/Outline pane gives you access to tabs that provide an overview of your pres­ entation; the Notes pane is where you enter speaker notes to help you when you give your presentation; and the Slide pane is where you work on the design of an individual slide. You can temporarily remove the Slides/Outline or Notes panes, or you can resize them to focus on one aspect of your presentation. Sizing Panes in Normal View Resize a Pane 1 Move your mouse pointer over the edge of the Slides/Outline or Notes pane until the pointer turns into two lines with double arrows. 2 Drag the pane divider in the appro- priate direction to make the pane larger or smaller. 1 2 If you drag a pane divider until the pane disappears, the divider is still visible. You can drag the divider to display the pane again. Note that the Outline/Slide pane on the left of Normal view can be resized to a maximum width of about 4 inches. Tip You can change how large the slide preview appears in the Slide pane without resiz- ing the pane by dragging the zoom slider at the bottom of the PowerPoint window. To refit the slide to the Slide pane in Normal view after you change its zoom setting, click the Fit Slide To Current Window button, located to the right of the zoom slider. The Fit Slide To Current Window button does not appear in any other view. Tip 44  Sizing Panes in Normal View
  • 52. Close and Redisplay the Slides/ Outline Pane 1 Click the Close button on the Slides/ Outline pane to hide it. 2 Click Normal on the View tab to redisplay the pane. 1 2 For information about working with the Slides tab, see Section 6, “Building a Pre- sentation,” starting on page 67. For information about working with the Outline feature, see Section 7, “Building a Presentation Outline,” starting on page 81. See Also Take advantage of the ability to hide and resize panes to make your work easier. If you need to focus on slide design rather than on entering slide text, close the Slides/Outline pane or make it smaller. If you want to quickly enter text in an outline format for many slides, enlarge the Slides/Outline pane to make the Outline tab larger and the text easier to read. Try This! Sizing Panes in Normal View  45 Creating Presentations
  • 53. Viewing Multiple Slides with Slide Sorter After you create several slides, you might want to take your focus off an individual slide and look at your presentation as a whole. The best view for this task is Slide Sorter view, which displays all your slides as thumbnails placed in sequence from left to right. If you have many slides, they are arranged in rows. In this view, it’s easy to locate a slide, rearrange slides to organize your slide show, or duplicate or delete slides. Display Slide Sorter View 1 Click the Slide Sorter button to display the view. Display More Slides in Slide Sorter 1 Drag the slider on the zoom tool to the left to make the thumbnails smaller and fit more slides on the screen. Drag to the right to make the thumbnails larger, fitting fewer on the screen. Slide numbers are displayed beneath each slide. This icon indicates that animation is applied to a slide. Slide timings appear beneath slides if you have rehearsed the presentation and saved timings. 1 1 You can do more than view slides in Slide Sorter view. You can delete, duplicate, hide, and reor- der slides, as well as preview animations and more. See Section 8, “Managing and Viewing Slides,” starting on page 91 for more features of this handy view. See Also 46  Viewing Multiple Slides with Slide Sorter
  • 54. Running a Presentation in Slide Show View Slide Show is the view you use to run your presentation in full- screen mode. If you have your computer connected to an LCD or television monitor, your audience can view your presentation using a larger screen format than is available on your computer. Slide Show view has several useful tools for navigating through your show, including a pen feature that lets you annotate your slides as you show them. You can even save your annotations at the end of the show. The new Reading view is essentially a slide show view that is useful for people viewing your presentation on a computer rather than a large screen. This view has similar navigation options. Start a Slide Show and Advance Slides 1 Click the Slide Show view button to display the slide show starting with the currently selected slide. 2 Press the Left arrow key to move back one slide, or press the Right arrow key to move forward one slide. 1 Running a Presentation in Slide Show View  47 Creating Presentations
  • 55. End a Slide Show 1 With a presentation in Slide Show view, press Esc on your keyboard to end the slide show and return to the view displayed when you started the presentation (Normal or Slide Sorter). 2 If you created any annotations while running the show, a dialog box appears asking whether you want to save your annotations. Click Keep or Discard. 2 You can end a slide show at any point, whether you’ve reached the last slide or not, by using the method described here. If, however, you finish running through the slides in your show and reach the end, you see a message that the show is over. If you see that message, press any key to close the slide show. Tip For information about using different methods to navigate through a slide show, including your mouse, onscreen buttons, and the Slide Show menu, see Section 14, “Running a Presenta- tion,” starting on page 195. For information about setting up the way a slide show runs, see Section 13, “Finalizing Your Slide Show,” starting on page 179. See Also 48  Running a Presentation in Slide Show View
  • 56. Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation As you work on a presentation, you should save it periodically so that you don’t run the risk of losing any of your work in the event of a com- puter crash or other problem. You should also save any changes you want to keep before clos- ing a file. Save a Presentation 1 Choose Save from the File menu to display the Save As dialog box. 2 If you don’t want to save the presentation to the default folder, select another drive or folder. 3 Type a name for the document of up to 255 characters; you cannot use the charac- ters * : < > | “ or /. 4 To save the document in a format other than the default PowerPoint file format (.pptx), select a different format. 5 Click Save. 1 2 3 5 4 If you want to save a previously saved presentation with a new name, perhaps to use as the basis for another presenta- tion, choose Save As from the File menu. Type a new file name and, if you want to, locate another folder in which to save the file. Click Save, and you save a copy of the presentation with a new name. Try This! To quickly save any changes to a previously saved docu- ment, simply click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar. The file is saved with- out displaying the Save As dialog box. Tip You can now save a presentation in PDF format, which allows users of Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader to view it. Simply choose PDF in step 4 of this task to use this feature. Tip Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation  49 Creating Presentations
  • 57. Close a Presentation 1 Click the Save button to be sure that all changes have been saved. 2 Click the Close button to close the file and PowerPoint. 1 2 If you want to close an open presentation with- out closing Power­Point—for example, to begin a new blank presentation—choose Close from the File menu. Try This! You can also close PowerPoint by choosing Exit from the File menu. Tip 50  Saving and Closing a PowerPoint Presentation
  • 58. Getting Help PowerPoint 2010 includes both offline Help, in the form of a searchable database of information, and online Help, which takes you to a Microsoft Web site. Learning how to use ­PowerPoint Help enables you to solve small problems that you run into and to delve deeper into PowerPoint features. Use Help 1 Click the Microsoft PowerPoint Help button to display the PowerPoint Help window. 2 Enter a search term and click Search. 3 Click the Show Table Of Contents button for a list of offline Help topics. 4 Click Home to go to the main listing of topics at any time. 5 Click the Print button to print the cur- rently displayed topic. 2 4 5 3 If you want to keep the Help window visible as you work in your document, click the Keep On Top button before clicking within the document. Caution Often, Help search results include links to other information. These links appear in blue. Click one, and you are taken to a Web page or other document where you can find related or additional information. Tip Getting Help  51 Creating Presentations
  • 59. In this section:   53 In this section: Working with Slide Masters One of the hallmarks of a good presentation is a uniform look and feel. To achieve that consistency, you can use themes and color schemes built right into PowerPoint. (For more about these features, see Section 9, “Using Slide Layouts and Themes,” starting on page 103.) But you might want to use other elements consistently from slide to slide, such as a company logo, and having to add these elements again and again—slide by slide— can be cumbersome. That’s where masters come in. A master allows you to add a graphic, modify the text formatting or slide layout, or add a global footer. Then, whatever you add to the master appears on every slide. Masters are flexible as well. If you want one section of your presentation to use a master element or two, but in another sec- tion you want to introduce a change, you can use more than one master in your presentation to do so. You can work with three types of masters in PowerPoint: a slide master, a handout master, and a notes master. Keep in mind that any changes you make to individual slides override the set- tings on masters. 5 ■■ Understanding How Slide Masters Work ■■ Making Changes to a Slide Master ■■ Adding and Deleting Master Sets ■■ Working with Handout and Notes Masters
  • 60. Master Layout thumbnail Master footer Master graphic Slide Master view Slide Master tab Individual slide Footer from master Master graphic Understanding How Slide Masters Work Slide masters start out with a set of slide layouts defined by the currently applied theme. That theme determines the font treatment, placement and size of placeholders, background graph- ics, animation, and color scheme. You can make changes to any of the layouts in a slide master so that any time you apply one of those layouts to a slide, whatever is on that layout in the master appears automatically. You can use the Edit Master tools on the Slide Master tab to add a master set or add a new layout to an existing master set. Use Edit Theme tools on the Slide Master tab to change formatting for the text on your slides. 54 Working with Slide Masters Working with Slide Masters
  • 61. Making Changes to a Slide Master Within Slide Master view, you can work with font formats and bullet list styles, insert text or text boxes, add graphics, or re­arrange elements of any slide layout. (You learn more about how to take these actions in Sections 6, 9, and 10.) You make these changes much as you do in Normal view. However, any changes you make in Slide Master view are reflected on every slide to which the changed layout is applied. If you want to apply changes to all slides except the Title Slide layout, make those changes to the Master Layout at the top of the layout thumbnails. Display and Navigate Masters 1 Click the View tab, and choose Slide Master from the Master Views group. 2 Drag the vertical scrollbar on the left pane to view more layouts in the master set. 3 Drag the divider between panes if you want to see more or less of either pane. 4 To close Slide Master view, click the Close Master View button or click the Normal, Slide Sorter, Notes Page, or Reading View button. 1 3 4 2 Make changes to the slide master, and then save the presentation as a template (.potx). You can then base future presentations on that template. That way, you can set up your company standard logo, colors, and so on only once and then use the template again and again. Try This! You can use the zoom slider in the bottom-right corner of the PowerPoint 2010 window to zoom in on and out of the currently displayed layout in Slide Master view’s Slide pane. Tip Making Changes to a Slide Master  55 Working with Slide Masters
  • 62. Insert Footer Information 1 With Slide Master view displayed, click a footer placeholder to select it. Note that one placeholder contains the current date by default. 2 Enter whatever text you want in the placeholder. If you want to move the footer placeholder, drag it to a new location on the slide. 3 A slide number element is included at the bottom right of slides. If you don’t want to use it, select it and press the Delete key to get rid of it, or if you want to use the element but prefer a different location, drag it to another location on the slide. 2 1 3 If you delete a footer placeholder in a layout and then want to put it back the way it was, in Slide Master view, click the layout to select it, click the Slide Master tab, and then select the Footers check box. All the original footer placeholders are reinstated. Tip The date footer is set to update automatically to reflect the current date when you run the presentation. If you don’t want to display the current date, delete the current date from the placeholder, and type a specific fixed date for each slide lay- out where you want it to appear. If you prefer that this footer reflect the date and time, or simply the time, use the Date Time button on the Insert tab to do so. Tip 56  Making Changes to a Slide Master
  • 63. Work with Master Graphics 1 With the slide master displayed, select the layout on which you want to place the graphic (for example, the title slide or a content slide), and click the Insert tab. If you want to insert the graphic on every layout except the Title Slide layout, click the top-level slide master. 2 Use the controls in the Illustrations or Images group to insert a master graphic in your presentation: • Click to insert a picture. • Click to insert clip art. • Click to insert a chart. 3 When you have inserted a graphic on the slide master, you can resize it or drag it to wherever you want to position it. 12 3 See Section 10, “Inserting Media and Drawing Objects,” starting on page 113, for more about inserting pictures, clip art, and charts in your presen- tation; see “Resizing Objects” on page 154 for more about changing the size of objects. See Also When you place a master graphic, you typically put it in a corner of a slide so that it doesn’t overlap placeholder text or elements such as large tables. Still, if you use a graphic on every slide, the odds are that it will overlap some object on a few slides in the presentation. Be sure to check for this, and then move the graphic or use the procedure in the task “Omit Master Graphics on Individual Slides” on page 59 to remove the graphic on those individual slides. Caution Making Changes to a Slide Master  57 Working with Slide Masters
  • 64. Add a Layout 1 With Slide Master view displayed, click the Slide Master tab, and choose Insert Layout. 2 On the new Custom Layout slide that appears, make any changes you want to the layout, such as the following: • Click Insert Placeholder to insert a new placeholder for any type of content. • Click an existing placeholder and press Delete. • Drag a placeholder to a new position on the slide. 1 2 You can quickly and easily remove a title or footer placeholder from a layout. In the Master Layout group of tools on the Slide Master tab, just clear the Title or Footers check box. The item you clear disap- pears from the current layout. Try This! If you want to include or exclude an item from all slide layouts, use the Master Layout. Click the Mas- ter Layout thumbnail to display it, and then click the Master Layout button on the Slide Master tab. Click to display or remove items such as a title or slide number from all slides, and then click OK. Tip 58  Making Changes to a Slide Master
  • 65. Omit Master Graphics on Individual Slides 1 With the slide displayed in Normal view, click the Design tab on the ribbon. 2 In the Background group, select the Hide Background Graphics check box. 3 Repeat these two steps for any other slides on which you want to omit master graphics. 1 2 What if you have more than one master graphic and you want to omit one but not the others from an individual slide? You have to do this manually. Use the steps here to omit all master graphics, and then insert the ones you want to use on the cur- rent slide one by one. Try This! Making Changes to a Slide Master  59 Working with Slide Masters
  • 66. Adding and Deleting Master Sets You can apply multiple themes to a single presentation. A set of master layouts is created whenever you apply an additional theme template to your presentation. When you apply another theme to some of your slides, another set of thumbnails is dis- played in the left pane of the Slide Master view. You can also insert a new blank master and then apply effects to it one by one to make a custom master or duplicate a master and then make changes to it. If you have no more need for a master, you can delete it, or you can rename it (for example, Company Logo Master) to make it easy to identify. Rename a Master 1 With Slide Master view displayed, click the Master Layout slide for the master you want to rename. 2 On the Slide Master tab, click Rename in the Edit Master group. 3 In the Rename Layout dialog box, type a new name and click Rename. 1 2 3 Don’t overdo it! The whole point of themes is that they instantly apply a consistent look and feel to your presentation. Mixing and matching too many themes creates a messy and cluttered-­ looking presentation. A couple of themes is typi- cally the most you should use in any presentation to designate major sections or changes of mood. Caution Consider adding presentations including custom masters to a centralized online library of pres­ entations in Microsoft SharePoint. By setting up a SharePoint site, you can build slide libraries and sets of templates everybody in your company can use to streamline presentation creation. Tip 60  Adding and Deleting Master Sets
  • 67. Delete a Master 1 With Slide Master view displayed, click the Master Layout slide for the master you want to delete. 2 Click the Home tab. 3 Click Delete in the Slides group. 21 3 If you delete a master from Slide Master, you can’t undo the delete. You have to insert the master again by applying a theme to slides or by using the Insert Slide Master button on the Slide Master tab when Slide Master view is dis- played. Note that you cannot delete the Title Slide master. Caution For more information about applying themes to your presen- tation, see “Apply a Slide Theme” on page 108. See Also Adding and Deleting Master Sets  61 Working with Slide Masters
  • 68. Insert Additional Masters 1 To insert a blank master, with Slide Master view displayed, click the Slide Master tab, and then click Insert Slide Master in the Edit Master group. 2 To insert an additional theme in your presentation, click Themes in the Edit Theme group, and then click the theme you want from the gallery that appears. 1 2 You can also simply apply a theme to your presentation or to some of the slides in your presentation in Normal view. That theme is automatically added as a new set of masters in Slide Master view. Tip 62  Adding and Deleting Master Sets
  • 69. 1 3 Working with Handout and Notes Masters Handouts are essentially a printing option for PowerPoint. You can print one, two, three, four, six, or nine slides on a page and hand out those pages to your audience to follow along with your presentation or to take with them as a reminder of key points. In the handout master, you can enter up to two headers and two footers, rearrange or delete placeholders, set the ori- entation of the handouts, and set the number of slides to print on a page. Notes can be printed for the benefit of the person making the presentation, providing a handy reference while present- ing. Notes consist of a slide along with an area for notes and placeholders for header and footer text. You can enter notes in the Notes pane of Normal view. The notes master allows you to arrange the placement of the various elements on the Notes page globally. Work with Handout Master 1 On the View tab, click Handout Master in the Master Views group. 2 Do any of the following: • Click in a placeholder and enter text or replace the date or slide number element already there. • Drag a placeholder to a new location. • Click to remove any of the four placeholders from handouts. 3 Click the Handout Masters contextual tab and then click Slide Orientation or Handout Orientation, and choose Portrait or Landscape. Working with Handout and Notes Masters  63 Working with Slide Masters
  • 70. 4 6 5 7 4 Click Slides Per Page, and choose an option from the gallery. 5 Click Background Styles, and choose a background for the handouts from the gallery. 6 Click the various tools in the Edit Theme group to choose formatting options from the various galleries. 7 Click Close Master View when you’re done with handout master settings to return to Normal view. You can use the Insert tab when in Handout Master view to insert graphics that appear only on your handouts. For exam- ple, you might want to insert a logo and the words “Company Confidential” on handouts to ensure that people treat the handouts as private. Try This! To leave background graphics off handouts, which can make the text easier to read, select the Hide Background Graphics check box in the Background group on the Handout Master tab. Tip 64  Working with Handout and Notes Masters
  • 71. Work with Notes Master 1 On the View tab, click Notes Master in the Master Views group. 2 Click in a placeholder and enter text or replace the date or slide number element already there. 3 Drag a placeholder to a new location. 4 Clear check boxes to remove any of the six placeholders from handouts. 5 Click Slide Orientation or Notes Page Orientation, and choose Portrait or Landscape. 1 5 4 2 You can drag any placeholder to a new location. Tip Working with Handout and Notes Masters  65 Working with Slide Masters
  • 72. 6 Click to choose a background for the handouts from the Background Styles gallery. 7 Click the tools in the Edit Theme group to choose formatting options from the various galleries. 8 Click Close Master View when you’re done with notes master settings to return to Normal view. 7 6 8 Be sure to format the notes body so that you can easily read your notes while making a presentation—often in a darkened room. Make the font size large, and use a font that is clean and easy to read. Tip For more information about formatting text to make it easily readable, see “Formatting Text” on page 145. See Also 66  Working with Handout and Notes Masters
  • 73. In this section:   67 In this section: Building a Presentation Although a presentation can contain text, graphics, anima- tions, and special elements such as charts and WordArt, most presentations begin with you entering some kind of text. Text is used for the major headings for each slide as well as for the individual bullet points that provide the details of your topic. You can enter text in an outline or in placeholders on individual slides in Normal view in Microsoft PowerPoint 2010. (For more about entering text in an outline, see Section 7, “Building a Pre- sentation Outline,” starting on page 81.) In this section you discover how to insert a new slide in your presentation and enter text on it. Once you enter text, you often need to edit it by modifying what you entered, cutting or copying text and then pasting it in new locations, or finding and replacing text. As you insert and edit text, knowing how to undo and redo actions as you go is another useful skill you’ll be very glad to have, and it’s covered in this section, too. Finally, in this section you work with manipulating the place- holders where you enter text. You can apply formatting to place- holders and align the text within them. One other feature you learn about is the Selection And Visibility pane, which aides you in selecting and manipulating placeholders on slides. 6 ■■ Understanding How to Build a Presentation ■■ Building a Slide ■■ Working with Text ■■ Finding and Replacing Text ■■ Manipulating Placeholders
  • 74. New Slide button Placeholder with centered text Outline created when you enter text Placeholder with fill color Slide content placeholder (detailed topics) Slide title placeholder (main topic) Understanding How to Build a Presentation You enter most text, as well as elements such as pictures and tables, by using placeholders on slides in Normal view. You can format placeholders to use fill colors and borders. Slide title and subtitle placeholders typically hold a single heading, while content placeholders are used to enter a bulleted list of key points. When you enter text in placeholders, it is reflected in the Out- line tab in Normal view. There are other text-only slide layouts as well as a blank slide. Try inserting a Section Header or a Two Content slide layout from the Layout gal- lery. You can add text to a blank slide by using a text box (see “Add a Text Box” on page 141), but remember that text in a text box is not reflected in the presentation outline. Try This! Although this section deals with the basics of inserting slides with a few different layouts, I deal with different slide layouts in more detail in Section 9, “Using Slide Layouts and Themes,” starting on page 103. See Also When you insert a new slide, it uses the layout of the slide that’s displayed when you click the New Slide button, except when you have a title slide displayed. PowerPoint assumes that you want only one title slide for your presentation, so when you display a title slide and click New Slide, the new slide uses the Title And Content layout. Tip 68  Understanding How to Build a Presentation
  • 75. Building a Slide When you open a blank presentation, ­PowerPoint provides you with one blank title slide. A title slide contains two place- holders—a title and a subtitle. When you insert another slide, a slide that uses the Title And Content layout is inserted by default. This layout contains a title place- holder where you enter the topic for the slide and a placeholder for inserting bul- leted points for that topic. Other slide lay- outs also use text placeholders, but these are the two types of slides you use most often for building presentation contents. (See Section 10, “Inserting Media and Drawing Objects,” starting on page 113, for information about working with slide lay- outs that include graphic elements.) Insert a New Slide 1 Click the Home tab. 2 Click New Slide to insert a new title and content slide. 3 Click the arrow on the New Slide button, and then choose a layout option from the Office Theme gallery that appears. With this method, you can choose any layout you want as you’re creating the new slide. 1 2 3 Building a Slide  69 Building a Presentation
  • 76. Enter Text on Slides 1 Click a title placeholder. 2 Type your text, and then click any- where outside the placeholder. 3 Click a content placeholder, and type one line of text, press Enter, and then type the next line of text. Bullet points are added automatically. 2 1 3 You can modify bullet point styles that are inserted in content placeholders. Click the arrow on the Bullets button in the Paragraph group on the Home tab and choose a different style, or click Bullets And Numbering at the bottom of the list to customize bullet styles. Tip For information about formatting text you type into placeholders, see “Formatting Text” on page 145. See Also 70  Building a Slide
  • 77. Insert a Symbol 1 Click in a placeholder where you want to insert a symbol. 2 Click the Insert tab. 3 Click Symbol. 4 Click the arrow on the Font list to choose a font set. 5 Scroll to locate the symbol you want to insert, and click it. 6 Click Insert. The symbol is inserted on the slide. 7 Continue to locate and insert symbols you need, and click Close when you’re done. 2 3 14 7 5 6 All fonts have some symbols, such as percent and dollar signs, but if you’re looking for little pictures or design elements rather than text, your best bet is to choose from these font sets: Symbol, Wingdings, Wingdings 2 or 3, or Webdings. Tip For some font sets you can narrow down the sym- bols available in the Symbols dialog box by choosing a category from the Subset list. For example, if you want symbols only for international currencies, choose the Currency Symbols category, and if you want only arrow symbols, choose Arrows. Try This! Building a Slide  71 Building a Presentation
  • 78. Insert the Date and Time 1 Click the placeholder where you want to insert the date and time. 2 Click the Insert tab. 3 Click Date Time. 4 Click a date and time format. 5 Click OK. 2 3 1 4 5 If you want the date and time to update whenever you print or show your presentation, select the Update Automatically check box in the Date And Time dialog box before you click OK in step 5. Try This! You can also place the date and time in a footer on a slide mas- ter so that it appears on every slide in your presentation. See Section 5, “Working with Slide Masters,” starting on page 53, for more about working with masters. Tip 72  Building a Slide
  • 79. Working with Text Most of us aren’t letter perfect the first time we write something. We need to go back and make changes and even undo some things we’ve done. Sometimes we need to move some text from one spot to another. To help out with these tasks, PowerPoint makes it easy to shift things around when you change your mind. You can edit text; cut, copy, and paste text; and undo or redo actions. For information about cutting, copying, and pasting entire slides or duplicating slide contents, see “Managing Slides in Slide Sorter View” on page 93. See Also The Paste Special command allows you to paste text or objects that you cut or copy to your PowerPoint presentation in different formats, such as HTML, which is readable by Web browsers, or OLE (object linking and embedding), which pastes an icon rather than the actual content in your presentation. For more about working with a presentation outline, see Section 7. Tip You can also edit text in the Outline pane. Remember that any change you make to placeholder text on a slide is reflected in the outline and vice versa. See Section 7 for more about working with a presentation outline. Tip Edit Text 1 Click in a placeholder at the location in the text that you want to edit. (If you select text to edit it, the Mini toolbar containing formatting tools appears.) 2 Take any of the following actions: • Press Delete to delete text to the right of the cursor one character at a time. • Press Backspace to delete text to the left of the cursor one character at a time. • Drag over text, and then press the Delete key to delete all selected text. • Begin typing any additional or replacement text. 3 Click outside the placeholder. 1 3 Working with Text  73 Building a Presentation
  • 80. Undo and Redo an Action 1 After performing an action such as typing, formatting, or moving an object, click the Undo [Action] button on the Quick Access Toolbar. The action is reversed. 2 To redo an undone action, click the Redo [Action] button. 3 If you want to undo a series of actions, click the arrow on the Undo [Action] button, and choose the actions from the list that appears. 1 3 2 You can’t undo an action you took prior to other actions with- out undoing every action you performed following it. In this case, it might be simplest to just make the change yourself by retyping, reformatting, or redoing whatever it was you did that you want undone. Caution A quick and easy way to undo what you just did is to press Ctrl+Z. You can redo what you’ve undone by pressing Ctrl+Y. Tip 74  Working with Text
  • 81. Cut, Copy, and Paste Text 1 Click the Home tab. 2 Click the placeholder you want to copy, or drag to select text if you want to copy or cut and paste the text only (and not the placeholder). 3 Click Cut or Copy. 4 Click where you want to paste the cut or copied text. 5 Click Paste. 1 23 5 4 If you click the arrow on the Paste button you can choose from a variety of special paste options that might allow you to keep original formatting, use destination formatting, or paste in a special format. Tip Working with Text  75 Building a Presentation
  • 82. Finding and Replacing Text Often when you create a presentation, you need to change every instance of a word or phrase. For example, your company might change the name of a product under development. In that case, finding and editing each instance manually can be time- consuming. Use the Find and Replace feature to easily find every instance and change them all instantly or one by one. Find and Replace Text 1 Click the Home tab. 2 Click Find. 3 Enter a word or phrase you want to find and change. 4 Click Replace. 5 Enter the word or phrase with which you want to replace the original text. 6 Do one of the following: • Click Find Next to find the next instance of the text. • Click Replace to replace the cur- rently selected instance of the text. • Click Replace All to replace all instances of the text. Note that you are not asked to confirm this choice, but you can use the Undo action to revert changes if anything disastrous happens! 7 When you finish finding or replacing text, PowerPoint displays a confirm- ing message. Click OK. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Use the Match Case and Find Whole Words Only check boxes in the Find And Replace dialog box to narrow your search. If, for instance, you want to find the word Bell (a last name) and you don’t want lowercase instances of the word bell or words such as bellow, you could use both of these qualifiers in your find and replace operation. Tip 76  Finding and Replacing Text
  • 83. Manipulating Placeholders Use the Selection And Visibility Pane 1 Display the slide you want to work on in Normal view, and click the Home tab. 2 Click Select in the Editing group, and choose Selection Pane. 1 2 In addition to using the Selection And Visibility pane to help you select objects, you can click the Arrange button on the Home tab and use the Bring To Front and Send To Back buttons to move a selected item in a stack of items to the front or back of others. Tip With the exception of text boxes (covered in Section 10), place- holders are where you create the elements of your presenta- tion. They contain text, drawings, pictures, charts, and more. Placeholders provide an easy way to arrange the components of each slide, and because they come with certain predesigned formatting, they make adding everything from a bulleted list to a chart easy. By selecting a placeholder (made easier with the Selection And Visibility pane), you can align the contents of placeholders and format their backgrounds and borders. Manipulating Placeholders  77 Building a Presentation
  • 84. 3 In the Selection And Visibility pane, do any of the following: • Click an item in the Shapes On This Slide list to select the object. • Click Hide All to hide all items. • Click Show All for an item again to display the item. 3 Visibility button If you click an object, the Format tab appears on the ribbon. This tab also contains the Arrange group of tools, including the Selection Pane, Bring To Front, and Send To Back buttons. Tip For more information about working with objects on your slides, see Section 10. See Also 78  Manipulating Placeholders
  • 85. Align Placeholder Contents 1 Click the placeholder containing the text you want to align, and then click the Home tab. 2 If you want to align only one line of several, select the text you want to align. 3 Click any of the alignment buttons, and the text shifts accordingly. 1 3 Align Text Left Align Text Right Center Justify Themes that you apply to your slides provide a certain design balance to elements on the page. Be sure that if you shift the alignment of text in placeholders that the text is balanced on the slide against any graphics or master elements such as footers. Caution Use centered text for emphasis for a single line of text. If you’re working with bulleted lists, you should usually use left or justi- fied alignment so that each bulleted item begins at the same place, making the list easier to follow. Tip Manipulating Placeholders  79 Building a Presentation

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