EVENT: OPEN HOUSE
DATE: DECEMBER 11TH, 2015
TIME: 0900 - 1500 HOURS
LOCATION: NTC CAMPUS SITE, CLAYTON, IN
(A short presen...
Table of Contents
Invitation Campus Open House Day December 11th, 2015
Table of Contents
SECTION I - An Overview of Develo...
Current Conditions
• Shortages of qualified personnel.
• Aging Workforce.
• Recruitment of replacement personnel ineffectiv...
THE WORK AND COLLABORATION WITH PARTNERSHIPS
National Transportation Center << Partnerships >> Wounded Warrior Corps
Workf...
Aerial View of NTC Campus and Surrounding Area
NTC
Campus
Location
Plainfield, IN
Indianapolis Airport
5
National Transport...
WORK CENTER DETAILS
Land Size: 69.368 Acres 3,005,640 Square Feet
Location: Clayton, IN on Hwy 39 4 miles from I-70
# of B...
Campus Site
Patriots Village Site
7
Aerial View of National Transportation Center
Campus Center and Patriots Village
Natio...
8
Aerial View of National Transportation Center
Work Center
Work Center Site
National Transportation Center
Skills Trainin...
9
Revised 09/15/15
8.21.2015 8
national
transportation
t r a i n i n g c e n t e r
Conceptual Master Plan
1. Vehicle Work ...
Tool sponsors for students in training
Recycle
Working Bays
ELITE 5S DESIGNED WORK CENTER
Land Size: 69.369
Location: Clay...
(4) Classrooms per Unit
11
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
Training Goals and Objectives
An Overview
National Transportation Center Establishes Certification Training & Goals with In...
TMC Organizational Details
Comprised of a broad collection of experienced fleets, equipment suppliers and
service provider...
Enrollment by Month
January
2016
February
2016
March
2016
April
2016
May
2016
June
2016
July
2016
August
2016
September
20...
Recruiting at the National Transportation Center
Monthly job fairs are held at the NTC campus as well as special events to...
Scholarships & Internships: A New Adventure in Youth Courtship
Offer local youth in your community scholarships to the Nat...
National Transportation Center Instructor Policy
NTC	Instructors:
NTC	instructors	are	cer1fied	trainers	employed	full	1me	...
Campus Orientation Day / Overview of The Industry
Course	Name
Campus	Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work
Center
Hours...
Basic Training: Class 7 - 8 Tractors
Course	Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work
Center
Hours
Work
Cente...
Basic Training: Class 4 - 6 Trucks
Course	Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work
Center
Hours
Work
Center	...
Basic Training: Tire and Wheel Technology Training
Course	Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work
Center
Hou...
Basic Training: Trailer Technology
Course	Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credits
Work	Center
Hours
Work	Center
...
Basic Training: Refrigeration Technology
Course	Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credits
Work	Center
Hours
Work	Ce...
Instructors:
Advisors to Community Colleges for Driver Training (NTC Certification Training Program)
• Train and develop co...
Truck Driving Academy: Basic Skills Training
Course Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work
Center
Hours
Wor...
Driving Academy Advanced Truck Driving Skills
Course Name
Campus
Hours
Campus
Days
Campus
Credit
Work Center
Hours
Work Ce...
Basic Training Classes are by NTC or by designated representatives approved by NTC staff review board for certification of...
Basic Training Classes are by NTC or by designated representatives approved by NTC staff review board for certification of ...
Become a Founding Member of NTC
Support the NTC & Wounded Warrior Corps $75 Shared
donation “Veterans Brick” with inscript...
“Make a Brick”
Donate to Our Campus
Construction Fund
“Make a Brick”
Honor a Veteran Hero
COOP a“Make a Brick”Event at You...
National Transportation Center Veterans Wall Details
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workf...
A L
A Z
A R
C A
C O
F L
G A
I D
I L I N
I A
K S
K Y
L A
M E
M D
M AM I
M N
M S
M O
M T
N EN V
N H
N J
N M
N Y
N C
N D
O H
...
Why Hire a Veteran
Proven Leadership: Veterans were put into leadership roles at early stages of their time in the service...
34
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
Resent research by:
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
35
36
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
By LORETTA CHAO
Sept. 22, 2015 3:53 p.m. ET
Truckers Are Struggling to Recruit Young Technicians, Mechanics
Growing sophis...
Challenges of the truck driving career
Posted: 6:00 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14, 2015
I’ve practiced law, led businesses, and wo...
FEDEx’s Vos Wins SuperTech: TMC Seeks Young Technicians
ORLANDO, Fla. — Eric Vos, a FedEx Freight technician from Boise, I...
National Transportation Center
Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
40
Our first time industry event (MC&E) has a successful response from industry members
National Transportation Center
Skills...
Seal	Dog	Foundation
Working	with	veterans	in	our	community	through
dogs	helps	makes	a	difference
Seal	Dog	Foundation	has...
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National Transportation Center Slideshow Presentation

Our slideshow offers details and information about the National Transportation Center located in Clayton, IN. Come visit us on or Open House Day December 11th, 2015, 0900 - 1500 hours.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National Transportation Center Slideshow Presentation

  • 1. EVENT: OPEN HOUSE DATE: DECEMBER 11TH, 2015 TIME: 0900 - 1500 HOURS LOCATION: NTC CAMPUS SITE, CLAYTON, IN (A short presentation will be given at 10:00AM) 7143 S County Road 675 E Clayton, IN 46118 RSVP VIA Email A VISION FOR THE FUTURE OF AN INDUSTRY “TRANSPORTATION” NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION CENTER CLAYTON, IN National Transportation Center
  • 2. Table of Contents Invitation Campus Open House Day December 11th, 2015 Table of Contents SECTION I - An Overview of Development Page 2: An Industry in Transition Page 3: NTC and WWC Collaboration Page 4: Overview of NTC Area Location Page 5: Site Map and Details Page 6: Aerial View of Campus Center and Patriots Village Site Page 7: Aerial View of Work Center Page 8: Campus & Work Center Rendering (revised 09/15/15) Page 9: Work Center Rendering Page 10: Classroom Renderings SECTION II - Training For One and All Page 11: An Overview of Training at NTC Page 12: TMC Office On Campus - Training the Trainer Page 13: Campus Population by Month Page 14: Recruiting at NTC Page 15: Apprenticeships & Scholarships Page 16: Instructor Policies and Recruiting Page 17: Day One Orientation Day Section III: Basic Training Schedule of Classes Page 18: Basic Training Courses on Class 7 & 8 Tractors Page 19: Basic Training Courses on Class 4 - 6 Vehicles Page 20: Basic Training in Tire and Wheel Technology Page 21: Basic Training in Trailer Technology Page 22: Basic Training in Refrigeration Technology Section IV: Driver Training Academy Page 23: About our Driver’s Training Academy Page 24: Basic Skills in Driver’s Training Acquiring A CDL License Page 25: Advanced Driver Training Skills Page 26: Request for Instructional Services or Training Page 27: Product Training & Instructional Services Offerings SECTION V - Campus and Scholarship Building Programs Page 28: Industry Scholarship Drive and “Honor our Hero’s” Brick Campaign Page 29: Building Our Campus “One Brick at a Time” Page 30: Build a Wall Campaign Page 31: Construction of a wall details APPENDIX Article: Veterans Population Map - 2015 ArticleL Why Hire Veterans ? Article: Logistical Movements of Freight Nationally Article: Regional Employment Demand within Transportation Article: Highest States in Demand for Transportation Employment Article: Truckers Are Struggling to Recruit Young Technicians, Mechanics Article: Challenges of the Truck Driving Career Article: FedEx, SuperTech Championship and the Need for Technicians Article: Hiring Our Heroes – A Great Match for Trucking Photo of our booth at the ATA MC&E Conference October 2015 Supporting our Veteran Companions (Canines) National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 3. Current Conditions • Shortages of qualified personnel. • Aging Workforce. • Recruitment of replacement personnel ineffective or does not exist. • Training new industry members is limited and expensive. • New Technology fast tracked into the industry without supporting elements. Shortages of qualified personnel include: • Truck Drivers • Diesel Mechanics • Trailer Mechanics • Refrigeration Mechanics • Operations • Warehousing • Logistical Management Current Industry TrendsIndustry in Transition 3 Scope: Originating the 1st centralized transportation industry educational training and employment center. Why: Our industry in need of 1,000’s of qualified workers to fill current and future positions. We are an industry in need of reinvesting in the youth of today to be able to continue this industries lifeline. If we do not effectively recruit and retain within our industry: We will affect a major event in the support of our national security and it’s ability to protect our existing way of life. Industries being effected / served: Trucking, Air Freight, Manufacturer’s, Railroads, Ship Lines, Warehousing Facilities and Logistical Industries. Bringing a new lifeline of industry membership with comprehensive education is a must. Our returning military personnel and individuals currently looking at transportation as an employing service industry is but one means to revitalize our industry. Collaboration with “The Wounded Warrior Corps” offers returning veterans and ex military veterans a path to education and employment into the industry. Where: Will be centrally located in Indianapolis, IN where trucking, rail services, warehousing, airfreight and logistics have created a national and international hub. When: Opening within 12 – 18 months from now. National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 4. THE WORK AND COLLABORATION WITH PARTNERSHIPS National Transportation Center << Partnerships >> Wounded Warrior Corps Workforce Development Fundraising Management Services Certification Training Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) Hands On Work Experience Training AmericaServes Veterans Outreach Project for Veterans Training Military Community Connections Oversight Industry Internships and Scholarships Governmental Collaboration Services (Grants Development) Transportation Industry Vocational Training Veterans Rehabilitation Services Fleet Work Servicing & Repairs Family Counseling Manufacturers Retraining & Updates Services Financial Counseling Services Dealer Training Services and Updates Housing Support Services Rebuilders Service Center Civilian Reemployment Services R & D Cooperative Services Educational Benefits Services OEM Ventures Additional Partnerships and Collaborations American College of the Building Arts Colonial Williamsburg Brick Company Navy Seal Dog Foundation National Transportation Center Objectives and Goals The National Transportation Center (NTC) was founded to support the transportation industry’s critical and long term training and workforce retention within the industry. The NTC is a combined “Classroom” Training Center and “Real Work Experience” Training Center. The NTC will focus on meeting the current critical needs of our industry recruitment and training of personnel and help develop the long term goals of training and retention within the transportation industry. Trucking’s Immediate Needs: Building a pathway for Military veterans transitioning from active duty. The NTC is focused on mobilizing veterans with the goal of quickly refortifying the U.S. transportation industry and establishing a national model for partnerships between all interests targeting workforce development and sustainment, while at the same time providing comprehensive support to our veterans and their families. Development of Future Workforce: Develop, cultivate and retain today’s youth interested in pursuing employment in the transportation industry. Providing the financial means for training and retention via scholarships and internship programs. 4 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 5. Aerial View of NTC Campus and Surrounding Area NTC Campus Location Plainfield, IN Indianapolis Airport 5 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 6. WORK CENTER DETAILS Land Size: 69.368 Acres 3,005,640 Square Feet Location: Clayton, IN on Hwy 39 4 miles from I-70 # of Buildings: 7 Total (2) Inspection Station units with 2 bays (1) Primary Shop with 16 Drive thru bays, Parts Counter, Work Center offices above (1) Primary Classroom Work Center (2) Secondary Shops with 12 doors each (1) Primary Parts Warehouse (1) Primary Recycle Warehouse (4) Parking areas for staff and visitors (Qty) Parking area spaces for equipment parking and storage CAMPUS CENTER DETAILS Land Size: 127.112 Acres 5,536,998 Square Feet Includes 3.16 Patriots Village acreage # of Buildings: 66 at full development Primary Office Building for NTC Veterans Rehabilitation Center Cracker Barrel & Starbucks Coffee House Clothing and Uniform Store (12) Student Housing Facilities (40) Training Classrooms PATRIOTS VILLAGE Land Size: 3.16 Acres+ 80 Room Hotel Chapel Cooks House BBQ Pit Amphitheater Outdoor Eating Area Micro Brewery / Tavern Campus Location and Overview of Development 6 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 7. Campus Site Patriots Village Site 7 Aerial View of National Transportation Center Campus Center and Patriots Village National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 8. 8 Aerial View of National Transportation Center Work Center Work Center Site National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 9. 9 Revised 09/15/15 8.21.2015 8 national transportation t r a i n i n g c e n t e r Conceptual Master Plan 1. Vehicle Work Center 2. Patriots’ Village 3. Chapel 4. Hostel 5. Coffee House & General Store 6. Veterans’ Square 7. Veterans’ Boulevard 8. Admissions Admin. Office 9. Vehicle Training classrooms 10. Dining 11. Housing 12. Parking 13. Community Center 14. Long term Housing Quad 15. Running Trail 16. Retention Pond 17. Bioswales/Raingardens 12 14 15 16 17 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 9 11 11 11 10 Green Area Future Development Navy Seal Companion Training Center National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 10. Tool sponsors for students in training Recycle Working Bays ELITE 5S DESIGNED WORK CENTER Land Size: 69.369 Location: Clayton, IN # of Buildings at full development: (2) 2 Bay Inspection Stations Primary Shop with 16 bays, Parts Room, Offices Upstairs Training Center with (8) classrooms ground level Upstairs with (4) classrooms; Break room below (2 - 4) Tool Manufacturers Showrooms (2) Bays: TBD (1) Parts Center (1) Recycle Center (1) Decal and Paint Shop (1) Wash Bay and R & D Shop (Subject to change) Veterans Blvd Working Bays Working Bays Working Bays Classrooms Upstairs Break Room Below Offices Upstairs Inspection Bays Parts Center Paint & Decal R & D 10 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development Work Center Rendering
  • 11. (4) Classrooms per Unit 11 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 12. Training Goals and Objectives An Overview National Transportation Center Establishes Certification Training & Goals with Industry Members “TRUCKING” : Will be a primary focus at the beginning “RAIL”, “OCEAN & SEAPORT”, “AIRCRAFT AND AIRFREIGHT” and “LOGISTIC’S AND WAREHOUSING” will get integrated into the training program. Specific training will be defined by areas of need as defined by industry members and training curriculums will be created to insure meeting those needs of the industry. Classroom Training: To be offered to all individuals interested in pursuing a career in the transportation industry. Offered also to industry members requiring training updates for product knowledge and service performance. Work Experience Training: A Value Added Development Program Offered in conjunction with classroom training. Collaborated training via our Work Center; OJT Training; and or Apprenticeship Training. Real “Hands On” experience training benefits each student as well as future employers. General Areas of Training: “TRUCKING” Transportation Management Principles Accounting for Transportation Document Management Human Resources and Recruiting Dispatch and Operations Support Safety Management & Principles Logistics & Transportation: All Modes of Transportation Equipment Maintenance & Shop Management Principles Driver Training & Performance 12 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 13. TMC Organizational Details Comprised of a broad collection of experienced fleets, equipment suppliers and service providers, ATA’s Technology & Maintenance Council (TMC) is the only industry association that is focused solely on truck technology and maintenance. Using their real world experience, members work together to create the industry’s best practices in truck technology and maintenance to help improve trucking equipment and transportation efficiencies throughout North America. ! On Campus Training the Trainer 13 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 14. Enrollment by Month January 2016 February 2016 March 2016 April 2016 May 2016 June 2016 July 2016 August 2016 September 2016 October 2016 November 2016 December 2016 Total Student s 0 0 0 0 0 75 75 75 75 150 150 150 750 January 2017 February 2017 March 2017 April 2017 May 2017 June 2017 July 2017 August 2017 September 2017 October 2017 November 2017 December 2017 Total Student s 225 225 225 300 300 300 375 375 375 450 450 450 4050 January 2018 February 2018 March 2018 April 2018 May 2018 June 2018 July 2018 August 2018 September 2018 October 2018 November 2018 December 2018 Total Student s 525 525 525 600 600 600 675 675 675 750 750 750 7650 January 2019 February 2019 March 2019 April 2019 May 2019 June 2019 July 2019 August 2019 September 2019 October 2019 November 2019 December 2019 Total Student s 825 825 825 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 10575 January 2020 February 2020 March 2020 April 2020 May 2020 June 2020 July 2020 August 2020 September 2020 October 2020 November 2020 December 2020 Total Student s 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 10800 Expected growth of campus based upon living quarters being completed each quarter 14 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 15. Recruiting at the National Transportation Center Monthly job fairs are held at the NTC campus as well as special events to allow employers the opportunity to meet the NTC staff and future graduates. Check our website for job faire events, dates and times. Interview current graduating students and visit with future graduates. If you have identified a graduating student and wish to have additional interviews after graduation or wish to set up a 2nd interview while at the campus, then advise the student of interest to hire and advise our Job’s Faire coordinator also of your desires. The “Job Offer” Advise graduate or student of offer and ask to initiate an “Offer to Hire” form and advise NTC staff of action. Offers to hire are available at the NTTC offices. Complete the form and then schedule a visit with our staff recruiters to finalize the offer. Fees due NTC: Fees associated in hiring our graduates: (1) Driver Hiring Fees: a. A 10% of salary offered on the “Offer to Hire” is due and payable within 60 days or less upon employer doing a final qualification and decides employee will become a permanent member of the company; b. If employer identifies deficiencies and wishes to have student return to retrain and re-qualify, then the student and staff at NTC will be notified of pending action and submit forms stating such deficiencies and upon successful retraining and a retest by employer, the graduating student will be hired on a permanent basis. c. If student does not meet the qualifications on the 2nd attempt, the employer has the right to cancel the “Offer to Hire” and will notify the NTC and student of such actions. Again the deficiencies must be stated in writing and given to both the student and NTC. (2) Mechanical Technicians Fees: a. A 15% of salary offered on the “Offer to Hire” is due and payable within 60 days or less upon employer doing a final qualification and decides employee will become a permanent employee of the company; b. If employer identifies deficiencies and wishes to have student return to retrain and re-qualify, then the student and staff at NTC will be notified of pending action and submit forms stating such deficiencies and upon successful retraining and a retest by employer, the graduating student will be hired on a permanent basis. c. If student does not meet the qualifications on the 2nd attempt, the employer has the right to cancel the “Offer to Hire” and will notify the NTC and student of such actions. Again the deficiencies must be stated in writing and given to both the student and NTC Training Services Department. (3) All other training program fees to be defined as developed. 15 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 16. Scholarships & Internships: A New Adventure in Youth Courtship Offer local youth in your community scholarships to the National Transportation Center. Help with Basic Training costs and then identify advanced course work for students. Create Summer Internship Training Programs. Get them involved early in our industry. Create curriculums for recipients to attend in advance. “Make a Veterans Brick” DONATE TO YOUR SCHOLARSHIP FUND ASK US HOW 16 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 17. National Transportation Center Instructor Policy NTC Instructors: NTC instructors are cer1fied trainers employed full 1me and oversee all training programs. Non NTC Instructors: • They are from fleets or manufacturer’s organiza1ons. • Industry instructor’s are cer1fied by NTC Management and Board of Directors. • Instructors are paid for each course taught. Contact us for details. • Instructors are provided lodging at the campus while instruc1ng. Instructor’s wanted in the following areas 17 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 18. Campus Orientation Day / Overview of The Industry Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits None Training Days Total Credits Instructor Today's Industry: An Overview Instructor’s Profile Industry Employment Opportunities Wages, Salaries and Benefits in Industry Basic Truck Technology Basic Trailer Technology Introduction to Mechanics Introduction to Dispatching and Operations Introduction to Warehousing and Logistics Trucks & Trailers: Then and Now Truck Types and Use Trailer Types and Use Manufacturers Tours 18 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 19. Basic Training: Class 7 - 8 Tractors Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits Non Training Days Total Credits Instructor Advanced Schematics Reading Damage Estimating and Costs Engine Diagnostics: Mechanical Engine Diagnostics: Electrical Cab and Chassis: Electrical Diagnostics Wiring Harnesses: Inspecting and Replacing Techniques Exhaust Systems Diagnostics Driveline Diagnostics Transmission Diagnostics Suspension Diagnostics, Alignments Fuel Systems Hydraulic Systems PSI Systems, Tire & Wheel Technology Body Types, Installations and Use Parts Control and Ordering Systems Work Orders and Paperwork Details Tools of the Trade 19 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 20. Basic Training: Class 4 - 6 Trucks Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits Non Training Days Total Credits Instructor Advanced Schematics Reading Damage Estimating and Costs Engine Diagnostics: Mechanical Engine Diagnostics: Electrical Cab and Chassis: Electrical Diagnostics Wiring Harnesses: Inspecting and Replacing Techniques Exhaust Systems Diagnostics Driveline Diagnostics Transmission Diagnostics Suspension Diagnostics, Alignments Fuel Systems (DEF vs ?) Hydraulic Systems PSI Systems, Tire & Wheel Technology Body Types, Installations and Use Parts Control and Ordering Systems Work Orders and Paperwork Details Tools of the Trade 20 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 21. Basic Training: Tire and Wheel Technology Training Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits None Training Days Total Credits Instructor Pre- and post-trip inspection guidelines Why tire inflation is important The effects of speed, load and improper inflation When tires should be rotated How to select a tire and wheel service provider The benefits of retreads What to look for in a quality repair How to use tire chains Why wheel lug nut torque is important How to clean, polish and refinish wheels The consequences of mismatched duals Total vehicle alignment 21 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 22. Basic Training: Trailer Technology Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credits Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits Non Training Days Total Credits Advanced Schematics Reading Damage Estimating and Costs Brake Systems Suspensions Electrical Systems Hydraulic Systems Multi Axle Systems Installation of Railgates and Tuckaways PSI Systems, Tire & Wheel Technology Repair and Replacement of Side Rails and Walls Replacement of Roofs and Bows Shortening and Extending Trailers Conversion and Installation of Doors GPS Technology: Trailer Tracking Systems Parts Control and Ordering Systems Work Orders and Paperwork Details Tools of the Trade 22 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 23. Basic Training: Refrigeration Technology Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credits Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits Non Training Days Total Credits Advanced Schematics Reading Defining Refrigeration Systems for Industry Engine Diagnostics: Mechanical Engine Diagnostics: Electrical Exhaust Systems Fuel Systems from tank to exhaust Installation of Refrigeration Systems Damage Estimating and Costs GPS Technology: Temp Control Tracking Systems Parts Control and Ordering Systems Work Orders and Paperwork Details Tools of the Trade Value Added Training Classes Refrigeration on Highway Trailers Refrigeration on Containers Refrigeration on Rail Cars Warehouse Refrigeration Systems 23 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 24. Instructors: Advisors to Community Colleges for Driver Training (NTC Certification Training Program) • Train and develop community college training centers • Curriculum Installations and training at campuses. • Regional oversight by NTC staff ATA Truck Driving Championship Program Create and develop ATA Truck Driving Championship program to be held at NTC campus beginning 2017. • Classify competition events • Add events (Heavy Haul and Flatbed competition) • Add Other events Advanced Training on Equipment Types • Doubles and Triples Training • Refrigerated Trailers • Basic Reefer Course Required • Flatbeds: Loading and Securing Loads, Techniques • Tankers and Pneumatics • Chassis’s and Container • Lowboys and Heavy Haul Equipment • Types of Equipment and securing loads • Distribution of Loads by equipment type • Auto Carriers • Loading and Unloading Vehicles Truck Driving Academy Details 24 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 25. Truck Driving Academy: Basic Skills Training Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits None Training Days Total Credits Instructor Introduction to Driver Training Trucks & Trailers: Then and Now Truck Types and Use Trailer Types and Use DOT Inspections and Writeups PreTrip Inspections / Post Trip Inspections * Requires completion of DOT Physical Exam and Drug Test prior to start of class. 25 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 26. Driving Academy Advanced Truck Driving Skills Course Name Campus Hours Campus Days Campus Credit Work Center Hours Work Center Days Work Center Credits None Training Days Total Credits Instructor Doubles & Triples Skills Refrigerated Trailer* Skills Flatbed Loading, Unloading, Tarping Skills Tankers & Pneumatics Skills Lowboys & Heavy Haul Skills Chassis & Container Skills Auto Carrier Skills * Requires Basic Reefer Course Comple?on Value Added Courses: • JJ Keller “Encompass” • Ins1tu1onal Technologies Program • Stay Metrics 26 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 27. Basic Training Classes are by NTC or by designated representatives approved by NTC staff review board for certification of course Classes for Manufacturer specific training will be done by the manufacturer or their designated representative and approved by NTC staff Request for Instructional Services or Training Date of Request Requested Start Date: Requested Completion Date: Potential Name of Course Classroom Training (Hours) Work Center Training (Hours) Brief Description of Course Instructor Requirements Requested By: Contact Information: 27 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 28. Basic Training Classes are by NTC or by designated representatives approved by NTC staff review board for certification of course Classes for Manufacturer specific training will be done by the manufacturer or their designated representative and approved by NTC staff Product Training & Instructional Services Offerings Sponsored By: Name of Course Basic or Advanced Product Supported Campus Hours Campus Days Course Credits Work Center Hours Work Center Days Non Training Days Total Credits Earned Instructor’s Name Instructor’s Profile Start Date: Completion Date: 28 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 29. Become a Founding Member of NTC Support the NTC & Wounded Warrior Corps $75 Shared donation “Veterans Brick” with inscription included. Receive A Plank Certificate with a donation of 20+ brick Receive an Original Signed Plank made from ancient bald cypress with logo’s of WWC and NTC when you donate 100 or more bricks to our campaign to build our campus “One Brick at a Time”. $75 BUILDING OUR CAMPUS “ONE BRICK AT A TIME” “Make A Brick” to honor our Veterans 29 http://digitalbooks.theonlinebookcompany.comVisit the Online Book store: National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 30. “Make a Brick” Donate to Our Campus Construction Fund “Make a Brick” Honor a Veteran Hero COOP a“Make a Brick”Event at Your Location “Make a Brick”Build a Commemorative Wall “Make a Brick” Donate to YOUR Scholarship Fund 30 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 31. National Transportation Center Veterans Wall Details National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development 31
  • 32. A L A Z A R C A C O F L G A I D I L I N I A K S K Y L A M E M D M AM I M N M S M O M T N EN V N H N J N M N Y N C N D O H O K O R PA R I S C S D T N T X U T V T VA W A W V W I W Y C T D E D C Alaska Hawaii Puerto Rico 29,825 -100,000 100,001 -200,000 200,001 -350,000 350,001 -550,000 550,001 -950,000 950,001 -1,851,470 Veteran Population by State: Fiscal Year 2015 Source: Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of the Actuary, Veteran Population Projection Model (VetPop), 2014 as of 9/30/2014 ´ Prepared by the National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics Guam 32 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 33. Why Hire a Veteran Proven Leadership: Veterans were put into leadership roles at early stages of their time in the service. The real world and often battle proven leadership developed in the military is well beyond that of a person in a civilian job. Mission Focused: Every member of the military is used to working in an environment that is focused on the mission at hand. They are not clock watchers. They are focused on what it takes to be successful in their mission. Team Players: All members of the military are used to working in a team environment. Some teams are small, others very large, but all members of the team know their individual efforts support the team in reaching the objective. Work Ethic: The work ethic of veterans is unparalleled due to the need to depend on each other for their lives. Every military person knows that their life and success depends on their team mates. At a time when many employers are concerned that Generation Y candidates are self-absorbed, too Independent, want everything now and expect praise for little or no work, the same age candidates coming from the military are noted for their ability to take orders, manage tasks, lead others, are disciplined team players, technologically savvy, can be educated and are smart! As a result, the work ethic of veterans is vastly stronger than the normal civilian work ethic. Training and Education: Today’s military veteran has been trained in nearly every occupation imaginable, with a strong emphasis on technology. Most of the training schools of the military that teach technology, leadership, sales, management and operations surpass those available to civilians. Immediate Contributor: Veterans, through their proven experiences in the military, become valuable contributors from day one of employment. Veterans are used to being challenged, encouraged to demonstrate initiative, think quickly on their feet and give recognition for performance to those who earn it. Background Checks and Security Clearances: Over 90% of those in the military have had background checks for various levels of security clearances. When you hire a veteran, they are less likely to become a risk to your operation. And if your company requires security clearances, a veteran can save you a great deal of money on special background investigations as a transitioning veteran can be transferred in status. Government Paid Relocation Assistance: When leaving active duty, veterans are given government paid relocation. Tax Credits: The Veteran Opportunity Tax Credit is available to employers that hire military veterans. Companies with Prior Military CEOs Perform Better: Military Experience and CEOs: Is There a Link? published by Korn/Ferry and the Economist Intelligence Unit found companies lead by CEOs with a military background have outperformed the S&P 500 Index by as much as 20% over the past three, five and 10-year periods. Prior military CEOs tend to last longer in the job and ex-military CEOs provide an average annual shareholder return of 21% versus 11% for the S&P 500 Index during the same time frame. Attitude: Military candidates have a CAN DO attitude! 33 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 34. 34 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 35. Resent research by: National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development 35
  • 36. 36 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
  • 37. By LORETTA CHAO Sept. 22, 2015 3:53 p.m. ET Truckers Are Struggling to Recruit Young Technicians, Mechanics Growing sophistication of truck engines is demanding new skill sets, but truckers say industrial jobs are losing their appeal for younger workers. The evolution of truck maintenance underscores how companies are looking for more technology-savvy talent throughout their ranks. As trucks have become more advanced, transportations companies are increasingly in need of technicians with computer skills. But truck operators say negative perceptions of the industry are making it difficult to compete for tech-savvy talent. “As a society we do not place a value on [this] type of profession,” said John Goralski, manager of fleet maintenance education for FedEx Freight. Mr. Goralski said the company is having a hard time filling open positions for technicians that despite efforts to recruit at community colleges around the country. Commercial vehicle technicians usually need a minimum of a two-year associate degree in diesel technology, and many companies are looking to hire people who have studied computer technology or engineering. “Class 8 tractors are very sophisticated right now,” said Mr. Goralski, who is in Orlando this week for the TMC SuperTech competition, where commercial vehicle technicians are competing for the title of “grand champion” in an event to promote the profession. “The radar system on these tractors for collision mitigation, collision avoidance, is very similar to what’s on military and commercial aircrafts. There’s a minimum of eight computer systems right now on a Class 8 tractor,” he said. FedEx and other transportation and logistics companies are also researching robotics, automation and other advanced technologies for use in their trucks. “It’s no longer just a matter of being able to turn a wrench and remove and replace a part,” said Doug White, vice president of fleet maintenance for armored car service Dunbar Armored. “It’s the ability to operate computers and do things like efficiency diagnostics.” The company has 80 mechanics who specialize in armored vehicles. The evolution of truck maintenance underscores how companies are looking for more understanding of technology throughout their ranks, from senior management to the maintenance yard. Industry experts say an understanding of technology is increasingly important throughout the supply chain. The inability to attract young people with broad skill sets, experts say, makes it increasingly difficult to find the right talent. The American Trucking Associations, or ATA, estimates that an exodus of baby boomers from the industry will make it even harder to maintain truck fleets, and that companies will need to recruit 67,000 new technicians and 75,000 new diesel engine specialists by 2022. “The problem today is just getting the young people to want to come into the trade,” said Mr. White, of Dunbar. “It’s a shame because I think there’s fantastic opportunities for these young people….it’s not there yet, but in the very near future it would not be unheard of for a service technician to make $100,000 a year if he’s good at his trade.” But the growing emphasis on information technology makes jobs primed for the next generation, industry officials say. “The folks coming behind today’s generation will have the skill set,” said Robert Braswell, technical director for ATA’s Technology and Maintenance Council. “We just have to make sure they know about the opportunities [in trucking] that are out there to excel and thrive.” Write to Loretta Chao at loretta.chao@wsj.com National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development 37
  • 38. Challenges of the truck driving career Posted: 6:00 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14, 2015 I’ve practiced law, led businesses, and worked in both Fortune 500 and privately held companies. In my 25 years’ experience, truck drivers are by far the hardest working but most misunderstood and under appreciated group of professionals I have ever encountered. Truck driving is an extremely difficult profession. Drivers are away from their families for days and weeks at a time. They navigate our increasingly crowded but underfunded and oft-decaying highway system. They work hard to meet customer expectations through safe and on-time delivery. Drivers are subject to a growing mountain of regulations that make an industry like banking look like a walk in the park. Now, add this to the negative media about trucking ― nonstop ads and billboards that vilify the profession, even an ad portraying trucks as “serial killers.” News stories cover the accidents but rarely report truck driver heroics that occur every day on our roads. Consider that accidents involving trucks are on display for public view, unlike other industrial accidents that occur out of the limelight and within the yellow lines of a manufacturing plant. Is it any wonder that we have a chronic truck driver shortage? The industry is projecting a shortage of 250,000 drivers by 2020. As a society, we are chasing people out of the field. At the same time, every one of us depends on trucks to deliver all that we own. Nothing that goes to market is untouched by a truck. The trucking industry cannot change these perceptions or the worsening driver shortage alone. Collectively, we must renew our respect for truck drivers. The ultimate respect we can show is a renewed commitment to highway safety. Rules and regulations, while critical, play a surprisingly small part of creating a truly safe highway system. Some would like to think that we can magically impact safety with more rules, regulations and government. This is a fallacy. Regulations only spell out the minimum that is required. True safety occurs only when each of us modifies our individual behavior. My company has cameras mounted in all of our trucks. I could share the horror stories that we see every day. You can do your part by eliminating distractions when driving, putting down the cell phone and understanding that a big rig needs more space and distance to brake than a car. These small but significant behavior changes will surely be appreciated by the professional driver who may be delivering lifesaving equipment to the hospital across town. We further need to recognize that driver pay must increase to attract the best people to this profession. While this would impact freight cost, low wages (as compared to other comparable professions) compound our inability to attract new drivers to the industry. And, if we cannot turn this around, this is not an industry problem ― it is a national problem. Respect is a two-way street. The trucking industry must continue to do its part to respect passenger vehicles. This is best accomplished by putting safety first through the creation of a safety culture. This type of culture recognizes, without compromise, that no load is more important than safety. Rushing to meet a deadline only creates accident risk. There is no regulation that can force you, me or anyone else to do the right thing when no one is looking. By creating a safety culture, we ensure that safety is a core value which may never be compromised for any reason. The trucking industry is highly fragmented. While the vast majority of drivers are safe and professional, we know that a handful of bad drivers damage our industry’s reputation. We must continue to identify and eliminate this small but visible group of drivers from our industry. Any employee base will have its bottom performers. If you encounter this on the road, report the behavior. Make sure it is noticed. We need you to be our eyes and ears, but do not allow this to tarnish the reputation of our ambassadors of the roadways. Let’s commit to permanent change in our treatment of professional truck drivers. Let’s work together to recognize that driving is a noble calling. Let’s come together to create a societal level of respect which is vital to attracting the next generation of Americans into this profession. Because we all share the road, we can all do our part. And, if it weren’t for these drivers, the rest of us would be hungry and naked. By Brian Fielkow National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development 38
  • 39. FEDEx’s Vos Wins SuperTech: TMC Seeks Young Technicians ORLANDO, Fla. — Eric Vos, a FedEx Freight technician from Boise, Idaho, admitted he was nervous when he didn’t hear his name called as an individual station winner at TMC SuperTech. He was left wondering, “What happened? Maybe I messed up a couple stations? I had my ups and downs, but I felt really good about the whole competition.” In the end, it was his steady performance on the competition’s written test and skills challenge that earned him the title 2015 Grand Champion. A record 147 competitors took part in the 11th annual National Technician Skills Competition here. The contest was conducted during American Trucking Associations’ Technology & Maintenance Council fall meeting, where he most frequently discussed topic was the technician shortage. “Hopefully, they will see [SuperTech] and maybe that will be enough to help guide them in this direction because we surely can use them,” said TMC Chairman Kevin Tomlinson. “There are a whole bunch of carriers out there that need them.” FedEx Freight technicians Brian Blevins and Josh Nordick finished second and third, respectively. The company completed its sweep when it also won the team competition as Doug Nickles, Drew Dilmuth, Larry Coatney and Steve Willis all earned individual station victories. “I’m a proud papa right now,” said Michael Ducker, CEO of FedEx Freight. “They try to make each other better, and that is the thing that makes me more proud than anything else.” While FedEx Freight claimed the highest honors, Chris Barnett of Ryder System and Terry Podralski of W.W. Williams Corp. each won two individual stations. Tens of thousands of dollars in prizes and gift cards were awarded to the top performers, including VIP trips to NASCAR races, courtesy of SuperTech’s sponsors and supporters. For Vos, the grand champion, the ninth time participating in SuperTech proved to be the charm. He finished in second place on two occasions. He said he “hit the books more” in preparation for 2015. “Once you master book work, it brings your score up.” Vos, 31, thanked FedEx for providing the tools “we need to become better technicians.” His family was not in attendance, but he thanked his wife, Amanda, and young children Zac and Emily for being his “home support group” and making sacrifices so he could compete. Vos originally studied mechanical engineering in college but transitioned to the technician field because it is better than “sitting behind a cubicle.” He said he will visit community colleges to encourage students to enter his profession, and he wants to become a teacher to help the next generation become better technicians. And many more will be needed. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates trucking will need to recruit 67,000 new techs by 2022 and 75,000 diesel engine specialists. George Arrants, SuperTech’s competition chairman, was among those offering ideas on how to attract a new generation of technicians. “This is a national program with a local solution,” he said. “We need to solve this with a grass-roots effort locally.” Mike Meredith, who heads the Professional Technician Development Committee, called the industry’s technicians under the age of 30 a critical “untapped resource.” He said that when he speaks with students about the computer and electronic skills today’s technicians need, it can be a difficult sell because of his older appearance. The response tends to be different when a younger professional technician joins him, he said. “They gravitate to that technician,” Meredith said. “The people who want to know more — they want to hear it from those actually doing the job.” The growth of the group’s TMC FutureTech competition suggests that some students might be getting the message. Thirty-seven students competed this year, more than double the 2014 total. Daniel Hanna of Forsyth Technical Community College took first place, Jonathan Kelly of Southside Virginia Community College was second and Karl Kerutis of WyoTech Blairsville placed third. “A lot of times, they were doing the same items the SuperTechs were doing. That was exciting to see,” said Tomlinson, who is director of maintenance at South Shore Transportation. Vos’ victory in the professional competition followed back-to-back grand championships by Mark McLean, a FedEx Freight technician from Newburgh, New York. SuperTech rules required McLean to sit out this year, so he helped judge an electrical skills competition. “It gives you a different perspective,” he said. “I don’t think some people realize it can be challenging to be a judge and make sure you are fair and equitable to everybody.” By Neil Abt Editorial Director 9/28/2015 4:00:00 AM 39 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development
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  • 41. Our first time industry event (MC&E) has a successful response from industry members National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development 41
  • 42. Seal Dog Foundation Working with veterans in our community through dogs helps makes a difference Seal Dog Foundation has devoted its energy to passionately serve all Veterans and their families by providing dogs, training, funds for fallen heroes, while winning the hearts and minds of the public through media outlets supporting veterans, visiting hospitals and directly impacting veterans who suffer from TBI, PTSD, any disabilities where we can lend a PAW, in addition to providing emotional support and providing help in anyway we can, the SEAL DOG way! A large part of our work revolves around Hinding homes for military working dog heroes (preferably with their handlers) and to build awareness of the positive impact that retiring a MWD can have. We know that the best person who can provide that support is another Veteran and their family members who have been through it. http://www.sealdogfoundation.com/home.html 42 National Transportation Center Skills Training, Certification & Workforce Development