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VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23
Short communication
Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in F...
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VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23
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Animal Husbandry, Sindh Agriculture University,
Tandojam for ...
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VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23
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[10] Nichol S, Ball SJ, Snow KR. Prevalence of intestinal
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Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Felis catus

Abstract Study was conducted to record prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of cat. A total of 100 fecal samples from cat (50 from male and 50 from female) were collected and examined for the presence of GIT parasites. Samples were collected and transported for the laboratory diagnosis. Animal data such as age, sex, and breed were recorded. Results of the present study revealed that 24% cats found positive for the gastrointestinal parasites. The percentage of infection was found higher in female cats (28%) than males (20%). The prevalence in adults and kitten was recorded as 21.42% and 30% respectively. Dipylidium caninum was found more prevalent with the infection rate of 9% followed by Toxocara cati, Aeluroslonglun obstrusus, Taenia taeniaeformis and Paragonimus kellikotti with the infection rate of 5, 5, 3 and 2% respectively. Key words: Cat, Felus catus, GIT parasites, Prevalence
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Science      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Felis catus

  • 1. 3 VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23 Short communication Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Felis catus Abdul Hussain Memon, Javaid Ali Gadahi*, Bachal Bhutto, Abdullah G Arijo, Nasreen Akhter and Mujeeb ur Rehman Memon Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Sciences, Sindh Agriculture University, Pakistan Abstract Study was conducted to record prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites of cat. A total of 100 fecal samples from cat (50 from male and 50 from female) were collected and examined for the presence of GIT parasites. Samples were collected and transported for the laboratory diagnosis. Animal data such as age, sex, and breed were recorded. Results of the present study revealed that 24% cats found positive for the gastrointestinal parasites. The percentage of infection was found higher in female cats (28%) than males (20%). The prevalence in adults and kitten was recorded as 21.42% and 30% respectively. Dipylidium caninum was found more prevalent with the infection rate of 9% followed by Toxocara cati, Aeluroslonglun obstrusus, Taenia taeniaeformis and Paragonimus kellikotti with the infection rate of 5, 5, 3 and 2% respectively. Key words: Cat, Felus catus, GIT parasites, Prevalence Received June 05, 2013; Revised August 12, 2013; Accepted September 04, 2013 *Corresponding author: Dr. Javaid Ali Gadahi; E-mail: drgadahi@yahoo.com To cite this manuscript: Memon AH, Gadahi JA, Bhutto B, Arijo AG, Akhter N, Memon MR. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Felis catus. Veterinaria 2013; 1: 21-23. Introduction The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or house cat to distinguish it from other felines and felids, is a small domesticated carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin and household pests. Cats have been associated with humans for at least 9,500 years. Several years ago the domestic cat arrived in North America accompanied with European colonist. Domestic cats originated from an ancestral wild species of the European and African wild cat (Felis silvestris). The domestic cat is now considered a separate species, named Felis catus. Physically the domestic cats are similar to their wild ancestor and most of their behavior such as hunting and other activity patterns remain unchanged from their ancestors. Domestication of cat in Egypt was introduced in 2000 BC. However, the Greeks had acquired domestic cats in 500 BC and they spread cats throughout their sphere of influence [1]. 21 Cats can suffer from a wide range of health problems, including infectious diseases, parasites, injuries and chronic disease. Vaccinations are available for many of these diseases, and domestic cats are regularly given treatments to eliminate parasites such as worms and fleas [2]. The parasites that your cat can get are externals and internals. The external cat parasites are most commonly fleas and ticks. However, cat can get and other external parasites like ear mites and lice. The internal parasites are primarily in the form of a worm. Unfortunately for cats, these worms come in a variety of shapes and sizes as well as bring a number of different health issues too [3]. Giardia is a common cat parasite. Symptoms may include foul-smelling stools that may contain mucus, loss of appetite and weight loss. Hookworms, tapeworms, roundworms and whip worms attach to the intestinal wall of the cat and can cause serious illness if not treated [4]. The internal parasites can be metazoan (e.g., cestode, nematode and trematode) or protozaon (e.g., Isospora, Giardia, Toxoplasma) organisms. The clinical signs associated with parasitism are fairly nonspecific, such as a dull hair coat, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, mucoid or bloody feces, anorexia, anemia. Furthermore, some parasites have the zoonotic importance and can infect the human beings [5-7]. The frequency of the parasite species can be affected by several factors including geographical region, prophylactic measures, season, veterinary care and cat population. It is reported by different workers that cats have a high frequency of parasites [8-11]. The present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of the GIT Helminthes in cats Materials and Methods A total of 100 fecal samples from cat (50 each from male and female) were collected and examined for the presence of intestinal parasites. Samples were appropriately collected and transported to the Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of
  • 2. 3 VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23 22 Animal Husbandry, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam for Laboratory diagnosis. Animal data such as age, sex, and breed were also being recorded. Direct microscopic examination, centrifugation floatation technique and sedimentation technique [12] were used to investigate faecal samples. Identification of the eggs or cysts made on the basis of morphology and size of eggs and the result was considered as positive when at least one parasite egg or cyst was observed in one of each employed technique. Results and Discussion A total of hundred faecal samples were collected from both male and female cats, including 50 faecal samples from male and 50 faecal samples from female. The results of the present study revealed that 24 samples were detected positive for the endoparasites. Prevalence of the helminthiasis was higher in the female cats as (28%) as compared to male (10%) (Table 1). Table 1: Overall and sex wise prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites Sex Examined Infected Infection Female 50 14 (2%8 ) Male 50 10 20 Total 100 24 24 Nine (30%) out of 30 kittens were found infected with the GIT parasites and in case of the adult cats 15 (21.42%) out of 70 samples were detected as positive (Table-2). Table 2: Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites with reference to age Sex Examined Infected Infection Adult 70 15 (2%1.4) 2 Kitten 30 9 30 The highest percentage of infections recorded was that of Dipylidium caninum (9%) and 5, 5, 3 and 2% cats were found positive for the presence of Toxocara cati, Aeluroslonglun obstrusus, Taenia taeniaeformis and Paragonimus kellikotti respectively (Table-3). In parallel to results of present study Mircean et al. [13] reported that overall prevalence of endoparasites in household cats was (34.3%) and Toxocara cati (20.3%) were detected as most prevalent parasites. Arbabi and Hossein [14] reported that infection of gastrointestinal parasites were higher in the male cats (59.3%) than female (40.7%). Zibaei et al. [15] reported that Toxocara cati was more prevalent in stray cats in shiraz. Changizi et al. [16] conducted a study on the gastrointestinal helminthic Parasites in Stray Cats (Felis catus) from North of Iran and prevalence of infection was reported as 90%. Table 3: Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites with reference to species Species Infection (%) Dipylidium canimum Aellurostronglun obstrusus Toxocara cati Taenia taeniaeformis Pargonimus kellikotti 9 5 5 3 2 In the light of the above findings, it was concluded and suggested that little care is being taken by the owners for the health of their animals, particularly of cats. It was observed during the survey that cats usually harbor different types of the parasites because of unhygienic condition and improper care by the owners. Such cats act as a reservoir of the infection for the healthy cats. Therefore, it is very necessary that pets, especially cats should be kept under hygienic conditions and should be regularly and properly tested for the presence of any type of the parasites. References [1] Serpell SA. The domestication of the cat. In: D.C. Turner and P. Bateson (eds.) The Domestic Cat: The Biology of Its Behaviour. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1988;151-158. [2] National Geographic News Burial Found on Cyprus" Oldest Known Pet Cat 9500-Year-Old (2004-2007). [3] Peter John Adams. Parasites of native fauna from Western Australia the applications of molecular study of parasitic infection in Australia. J. (Nat. Sci.) 2003; 03: 12 – 26. [4] Staff iVillage. Common Cat Parasites Jan 1, 1999. [5] American association of Feline Practitioners. Gastrointestinal Parasites of Cats Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, New York 2006; 14853-6401. [6] Fisher M. Toxocara cati an underestimated zoonotic agent. Trends Parasitol 2003; 19:167-170. [7] Laberthe N. Survey of gastrointestinal helminthes in cats of the SI metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Vet Parasitol 2004; 123:131-9. [8] McColm AA, Hutchison W M. The prevalence of intestinal helminths in stray cats in central Scotland. J Helminthol 1980; 54: 255-257. [9] Niak A. The prevalence of Toxocara cati and other parasites in Liverpool cats. Vet Rec 1972; 91: 534-536.
  • 3. 3 VETERINARIA 2013 | Volume 1 | Issue 1 | pages 21-23 23 [10] Nichol S, Ball SJ, Snow KR. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in feral cats in some urban areas of England. Vet Parasitol 1981; 9: 107-110. [11] Calvete C, Lucientes J, Castillo JA, Estrada R, Garcia MJ, Gastrointestinal helminth parasites in stray cats from the mid-Ebro Valley, Spain 1998; Vet Parasitol 75: 235–240. [12] Urquhart GM., et.al. Veterinary Parasitology. 3rd ED. Longman Scientific and Technical, Burnt Mill, Harlow, U.K. 1987; 209, 211, 238. [13] Mircean V, Titilincu A, Vasile C. Prevalence of endoparasites in household cat (Felis catus) populations from Transylvania (Romania) and association with risk factors Vet Parasitology 2010; 171(1-2):163-166. [14] Arbabi M, Hossein H. Gastrointestinal parasites of stray cats in Kashan. Trop Biomed 2008; 26(1):16-22. [15] Zibaei M, Seyed Mahmoud S, Bahador S. Prevalence of Toxocara cati and other intestinal helminthes in stray cats in Shiraz, Iran. Tropical Biomedicine 2007; 24(2): 39-43. [16] Changizi E, Mobedi I, Salimi-Bejestani MR, Rezaei- Doust A. Gastrointestinal helminthic Parasites in Stray Cats (Felis catus) from North of Iran. Iranian J Parasitol 2007; 2(4):25-29.

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