learning to research, researching to learn
(or if you love acronyms) rsdf in pbl
Linda Kalejs
Research and Learning Coo...
2
this short talk is about how Linda and I implemented
a rigorous research training exercise into industrial
design und...
3
the experiment
4
population
the ID degree:
1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year
DGN1001
Design studio 1
6
IDE1112
Industrial
Desi...
5
population
a “depth” studio unit
8 hours contact, 12CPTS
one project for the whole semester
30 students
1st year 2...
6
Michael Oechsle
travel light
Project Aim:
“To design an urban element
system that supports and
encourages the prac...
7
jeffrey hughes
Project description.
Recently there have been
breakthroughs in the ar-eas
of bioengineering and
mic...
8
bread products.
items.
the waste. Once full, the waste is ready for the
waste into the second stage where it matures...
9
M A G G I E P H O E N G SYSTEM OVERVIEW
stores shared workspaces and recordings of collaborations
google mirror
hard...
intervention
10
11
IDE3116:studio 6travel light - your guide to the semester
= note something important
= something due, either for rev...
intervention
12
IDE3116:studio 6travel light - your guide to the semester
= note something important
= something due, ...
13
Pedagogy:
Combining Project Based Learning with the Research
Skills Development Framework.
researching
to learn
l...
14
Curious Determined Discerning Harmonising Creative Constructive
Research Skill Development Framework
A conceptual fr...
comparison
before - after
15
outcomes
16
17
9%
32%
41%
14%
9% 5%
5%
9%
18%
45%
23%
50%
14%
9%
9%
18%
RSDF Facet and survey question
5%
9%
55%
2...
outcomes
Mapping of results to RSD extent of
student autonomy:
Level 5 open Research
Level 4 student-initiated researc...
19
Practice:
Combining Project Based Learning with the Research
Skills Development Framework.
Briefing
educator
acti...
the take away 3rd year Industrial Design UG students (and perhaps your students too):
20
• coped well with scaffolded re...
thanks
of 21

Awesome research skills training for undergraduate students

Learning Lunch Box 23 September 2014 Presenter: Dr Robbie Napper Title: Awesome research skills training for undergraduate students
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Awesome research skills training for undergraduate students

  • 1. learning to research, researching to learn (or if you love acronyms) rsdf in pbl Linda Kalejs Research and Learning Coordinator Library team leader, Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture Dr Robbie Napper Senior Lecturer, Course Coordinator, Industrial Design MADA PhD Program Director
  • 2. 2 this short talk is about how Linda and I implemented a rigorous research training exercise into industrial design undergraduate studio with awesome results. I’ll talk about this experiment covering: • Population (who we used) • Intervention (What we did) • Comparison (How we measured the results) • Outcomes (what we achieved), and • the educational take away
  • 3. 3 the experiment
  • 4. 4 population the ID degree: 1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year DGN1001 Design studio 1 6 IDE1112 Industrial Design studio 2 6 OHS1000 Intro to OHSE 0 unit code Name Studio Tech Theory electives points pts IDE1802 Materials and manufacturing 1 6 DIS1103 Digital processes 1 6 IDE1502 Modelmaking and workshop 6 AHT1101 Intro to visual culture 6 24 DWG1201 Drawing 1 6 IDE1602 Product drawing 6 IDE2113 Industrial Design studio 3 6 IDE2211 Engineering drn (Solidworks) 6 IDE2701 Product interface design 6 TAD2214 Critical issues in design IDE2811 Mechanics and electronics 6 IDE2303 Ergonomics DIS1911 3D Design and vis. (MAYA) 6 6 6 IDE2114 Industrial Design studio 4 6 IDE3115 Industrial Design studio 5 6 IDE3814 Materials and manufacturing 2 6 TAD3214 Contemporary discourse in des 6 DIS2904 3D Modelling (Alias) 6 IDE4117 Industrial Design studio 7 TAD4523 Design research methods 6 PPR4102 Professional practice 6 Elective 6 Elective 6 Elective 6 IDE3116 Industrial Design studio 6 12 12 IDE4118 Industrial Design studio 8 18 24 24 24 24 24 24 24
  • 5. 5 population a “depth” studio unit 8 hours contact, 12CPTS one project for the whole semester 30 students 1st year 2nd year 3rd year 4th year DGN1001 Design studio 1 6 IDE1112 Industrial Design studio 2 6 OHS1000 Intro to OHSE 0 unit code Name Studio Tech Theory electives points pts IDE1802 Materials and manufacturing 1 6 DIS1103 Digital processes 1 6 IDE1502 Modelmaking and workshop 6 AHT1101 Intro to visual culture 6 24 DWG1201 Drawing 1 6 IDE1602 Product drawing 6 IDE2113 Industrial Design studio 3 6 IDE2211 Engineering drn (Solidworks) 6 IDE2701 Product interface design 6 TAD2214 Critical issues in design IDE2811 Mechanics and electronics 6 IDE2303 Ergonomics DIS1911 3D Design and vis. (MAYA) 6 6 6 IDE2114 Industrial Design studio 4 6 IDE3115 Industrial Design studio 5 6 IDE3814 Materials and manufacturing 2 6 TAD3214 Contemporary discourse in des 6 DIS2904 3D Modelling (Alias) 6 IDE4117 Industrial Design studio 7 TAD4523 Design research methods 6 PPR4102 Professional practice 6 Elective 6 Elective 6 Elective 6 IDE3116 Industrial Design studio 6 12 12 IDE4118 Industrial Design studio 8 18 24 24 24 24 24 24 24
  • 6. 6 Michael Oechsle travel light Project Aim: “To design an urban element system that supports and encourages the practice of routine walking, both for transport and recreational purposes. This should include as a minimum, the provision of rest points for elderly users.” tranSIT is a hybrid walking waypoint system for urban environments, combining seating with wayfinding and street lighting. It is designed to be minimally obtrusive by utilising wall spaces around cities, improving walkability for people of all ages. The seat is designed with brief rest stops in mind, assuming more social, long-term seating is available at destinations such as shops and green spaces. Staying true to the principles of ‘inclusive design’, the seat is designed to be accessible, comfortable and safe. To help encourage walking amongst the local community, simple walking times to popular nearby destinations and public transport links are provided, along with QR code integration for access to maps and further information. Using the translucency of the solid surface material, LED street lighting is integrated to provide extra security for those walking at night. Power is supplied via a small roof mounted battery and solar unit. This also allows for the possible integration of WiFi or street phone charging. WALKING WAYPOINTS FOR URBAN ENVIRONMENTS AN OBVIOUS LACK OF REST POINTS Research shows that seating on key pedestrian routes should be considered every 100m to provide rest points and to encourage street activity. How can we help make our cities more walkable for people of all ages? AN AGEING POPULATION Globally, the share of older people in urban communities will multiply 16 times from about 56 million in 1998 to over 908 million in 2050. A person in their mid-70’s cannot walk for much longer than 10 minutes without a break. 3 Key COntext Factors A DECLINE IN WALKING Commuting by foot has been shown to reduce the risk of illnesses such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease by up to 40%. Yet the proportion of Australian urban trips made by foot has halved since the 50’s. This is a global trend in developed nations.
  • 7. 7 jeffrey hughes Project description. Recently there have been breakthroughs in the ar-eas of bioengineering and micro manufacture. These advances have opened a whole new way in which we can analyse and monitor the human body. In partnership with industry leader MiniFAB we have explored the ways in which these innovative technologies can be used to shape the future of elite athlete training.Focusing on biochemical monitoring and collection of data from points on the skin we have devel-oped a range of devices that unlock a future array of previously unobtainable and influential data on athlete’s performance; ranging from oxygen uptake in the blood to analysis of the composi-tion of sweat. Through this project we have explored the charac-ter and requirements of our end users and developed a full system to exceed their expectations and create a product range without paral-lel. The base system involves five modules: a sensor that collects data from the skin, robust sensor packaging ensuring ease of applica-tion, a device to collect, col-late and transfer data from multiple streams in real time, a docking system and a transportation case with an emphasis on simplicity. Each team member focused on a particular product in detail, sharing their knowledge to enhance each final individu-ally designed system range. Intended as the companion of the future the MiniFAB TOR™ focuses on un-precedented skin / device mounting possibilities with scope for attachment over the entire body. Its unique reusable and washable GECKO®NANOPLAST® adhesive strap ensures ro-bust attachment and im-mense comfort, through wet and sweaty conditions. The tessellated modular design provides unparalleled twin curvature flexibility, reduc-ing athlete impedance and promoting regular use. Its intuitive and simple design makes operation an ease and reduces the associated learning curve.The MiniFAB TOR™ is the next stage in the athlete monitoring revolu-tion. Combining flexibility and emotion at its core TOR™ is the athlete’s true companion to victory, the key to unlock-ing their peak potential. PACKAGE SENSOR DEVICE DOCK CASE minifab
  • 8. 8 bread products. items. the waste. Once full, the waste is ready for the waste into the second stage where it matures. stage, ready to be used in the garden! Access to compost Aerating and Maturing Shredding and Mixing Collect Food Waste This includes veggie scraps, tea leaves, egg shells and fresh grass clippings. Avoid meat, dairy and Collect Garden Waste This includes dry leaves, wood shavings, nuts and shells, twigs, hay, shredded paper and cardboard The First Stage Fill COMPlete with equal amounts of food and garden waste, and roll. This helps shred and mix second stage. The Second Stage Transport the prepared waste from first to second stage by pulling the top handle. This drops the COMPlete must be rolled once a week to aerate and mix the developing compost. Compost Soon the compost will be ready. When the bottom handle is pulled, compost drops from the second Moving wheels powers system Moves contents to second stage AKHILA POKKULURI travel light The COMPlete is a self-contained home composting unit, aiming to make the process of composting simple and quick. It also aims to eliminate all negative conceptions of composting, hence increasing its marketability. COMPlete incorporates movement powered features that automatically regulate compost development. The user adds nitrogen rich kitchen waste and carbon rich garden waste in equal ratios. Moving COMPlete then shreds and mixes the waste, in preparation for composting. The wheels gear with the bottom set of blades, which are connected to the top set of blades through a belt system. Once mixed and shredded, the user is then pulls the top handle at the front of the composting unit, to drop the mixture into the second set of blades. Here, the compost will mature. Moving the bin now aerates the mixture, and an aerobic reaction occurs. After maturing, the compost is ready. The user must pull the bottom handle at the front to allow the compost to drop through the bottom of the bin, to the ground. COMPlete’s solution to quick compost lies in the constant shredding, which creates smaller particles for the reaction. The enclosed volume provides a warm and dark environment to further accelerate the reaction. As COMPlete can also be transported around the garden, fresh compost can be accessed close to the veggie patch whenever required. Compost need never sit stagnant again and therefore, will not collect unwanted odours, critters or weeds, eliminating the negativities usually related to compost.
  • 9. 9 M A G G I E P H O E N G SYSTEM OVERVIEW stores shared workspaces and recordings of collaborations google mirror hardware to process 3d image into 2d keeps video and touchscreen feeds separate other contributors limited contribution interaction watching conference, low power device software available google calendar plan around time zone differences google docs collaborative software already created google hangouts/g+ acts as a phonebook, leave quick messaes, make calls google hangouts cloud server google mirror must be granted access to files interaction hand touch eye-gaze eye-contact hdmi/usb capacitive speech body observervs screenshare: software which is not available in the gdocs suite
  • 10. intervention 10
  • 11. 11 IDE3116:studio 6travel light - your guide to the semester = note something important = something due, either for review, or grading. week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 e-wk 1 project intro product sector brainstorm choose brief product type brainstorm Open day sunday 4th August. 1 day research task nominate times for next week’s review 8 concepts due discussion and review of all 8 ideas development of chosen concept 3 concept pechakucha choose projects commence research What’s a pechakucha? A 30-second per slide presenta-tion forcing the presenter to cover only the most salient points of their design. We’ll make one big file in google docs, set the timing, and hit go! task clarifica-tion research research methods - linda from the library research project proposal pechakucha Linda will give us a tutorial on how to find information relevant to our individual topics. Finding journals, articles, papers, statistics etc all using the library’s awesome resources. This session starts at 9:30am in the library. colour and trim detail design book design tutorial discussion of final deliverables: poster, model, ebook Mid semester break. Work on your model! design freeze drawing pack due start work on models unpainted model due review poster ideas spatial planning for exhibition last class! review model, poster, ebook ie everything! event planning for exhibition exhibition! model, poster, ebook due in by 10am Swot-vac week. 20% 15% 10% 5% your lecturer: dr robbie napper robbie.napper@monash.edu office g3.15 ph: 990 31059 email me! 110% 50% Brad from communication design will give us a tutorial on book design and typography. 11am. Note that these ungraded milestones are critique reviews; the content will go into your eBook.
  • 12. intervention 12 IDE3116:studio 6travel light - your guide to the semester = note something important = something due, either for review, or grading. week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 e-wk 1 project intro product sector brainstorm choose brief product type brainstorm Open day sunday 4th August. 1 day research task nominate times for next week’s review 8 concepts due discussion and review of all 8 ideas development of chosen concept 3 concept pechakucha choose projects commence research What’s a pechakucha? A 30-second per slide presenta-tion forcing the presenter to cover only the most salient points of their design. We’ll make one big file in google docs, set the timing, and hit go! task clarifica-tion research research methods - linda from the library research project proposal pechakucha Linda will give us a tutorial on how to find information relevant to our individual topics. Finding journals, articles, papers, statistics etc all using the library’s awesome resources. This session starts at 9:30am in the library. colour and trim detail design book design tutorial discussion of final deliverables: poster, model, ebook Mid semester break. Work on your model! design freeze drawing pack due start work on models unpainted model due review poster ideas spatial planning for exhibition last class! review model, poster, ebook ie everything! event planning for exhibition exhibition! model, poster, ebook due in by 10am Swot-vac week. 20% 15% 10% 5% your lecturer: dr robbie napper robbie.napper@monash.edu office g3.15 ph: 990 31059 email me! 110% 50% Brad from communication design will give us a tutorial on book design and typography. 11am. Note that these ungraded milestones are critique reviews; the content will go into your eBook.
  • 13. 13 Pedagogy: Combining Project Based Learning with the Research Skills Development Framework. researching to learn learning to research improvements Key: educator action or requirement educator: student action observed outcome Existing practice New practice Project based learning Overall context for the unit. With increased skills. Project outcomes. Lifelong learning. Transferrable skills. Self driven learning. Attain graduate attributes. Employablility. Classroom motivation. Library-Faculty partnerships. At library tutorial. Scaffolds Facilitates Evaluates research skills development framework Augments PBL approach. intervention 2
  • 14. 14 Curious Determined Discerning Harmonising Creative Constructive Research Skill Development Framework A conceptual framework for the explicit, coherent, incremental and spiralling development of students’ research skills Level 1 (Prescribed Research) Highly structured directions and modelling from educator prompt student research Level 2 (Bounded Research) Boundaries set by and limited directions from educator channel student research Level 3 (Scaffolded Research) Scaffolds placed by educator shape student independent research Level 4 (Student-initiated Research) Students initiate the research and this is guided by the educator Level 5 (Open Research) Students research within self-determined guidelines that are in accord with discipline or context. a. Embark & Clarify Respond to or initiate research and clarify or determine what knowledge is required, heeding ethical/cultural and social/team considerations. Respond to questions/tasks arising explicitly from a closed inquiry. Use a provided structured approach to clarify questions, terms, requirements and expectations. Respond to questions/tasks required by and implicit in a closed inquiry. Choose from several provided structures to clarify questions, terms, requirements and expectations. Respond to questions/tasks generated from a closed inquiry. Choose from a range of provided structures or approaches to clarify questions, terms, requirements and expectations. *Generate questions/aims/ hypotheses framed within structured guidelines*. *Generate questions/aims/ hypotheses based on experience, expertise and literature*. b. Find & Generate Find and generate needed information/data using appropriate methodology. Collect and record required information or data using a prescribed methodology from a prescribed source in which the information/data is clearly evident. Collect and record required information/data using a prescribed methodology from prescribed source/s in which the information/ data is not clearly evident. Collect and record required information/data from self-selected sources using one of several prescribed methodologies. Collect and record self-determined information/ data from self-selected sources, choosing an appropriate methodology based on structured guidelines. Collect and record self-determined information/data from self-selected sources, choosing or devising an appropriate methodology with self-structured guidelines. c. Evaluate & Reflect Determine and critique the degree of credibility of selected sources and of data generated, and reflect on the research processes used. Evaluate information/data and reflects on inquiry process using simple prescribed criteria. Evaluate information/data and reflect on the inquiry process using given criteria. Evaluate information/data and inquiry process using criteria related to the aims of the inquiry. Reflect insightfully to improve own processes used. Evaluate information/data and the inquiry process comprehensively using self-determined criteria developed within structured guidelines. Reflect insightfully to refine others’ processes. Evaluate information/data and inquiry process rigorously using self-generated criteria based on experience, expertise and the literature. Reflect insightfully to renew others’ processes. d. Organise & Manage Organise information and data to reveal patterns and themes, and manage teams and research processes. Organise information/data using prescribed structure. Manage linear process provided. Organise information/data using a choice of given structures. Manage a process which has alternative pathways. Organise information/data using recommended structures. Manage self-determined processes with multiple possible pathways. Organise information/data using student-determined structures, and manage the processes, within the parameters set by the guidelines. Organise information/data using student-determined structures and management of processes. e. Analyse & Synthesise Analyse information/data critically and synthesise new knowledge to produce coherent individual/team understandings. Analyse and synthesise information/data to reproduce existing knowledge in prescribed formats. *Ask emergent questions of clarification/curiosity*. Analyse and synthesise information/data to reorganize existing knowledge in standard formats. *Ask relevant, researchable questions emerging from the research*. Analyse and synthesise information/data to construct emergent knowledge. *Ask rigorous, researchable questions based on new understandings*. Analyse and create information/data to fill knowledge gaps stated by others. Analyse and create information/data to fill student-identified gaps or extend knowledge. f. Communicate and Apply Write, present and perform the processes, understandings and applications of the research, and respond to feedback, accounting for ethical, social and cultural (ESC) issues. Use mainly lay language and prescribed genre to demonstrate understanding for lecturer/ teacher as audience. Apply to a similar context the knowledge developed. Follow prompts on ESC issues. Use some discipline-specific language and prescribed genre to demonstrate understanding from a stated perspective and for a specified audience. Apply to different contexts the knowledge developed. Specify ESC issues. Use discipline-specific language and genres to demonstrate scholarly understanding for a specified audience. Apply the knowledge developed to diverse contexts. Specify ESC issues in initiating, conducting and communicating. Use discipline-specific language and genres to address gaps of a self-selected audience. Apply innovatively the knowledge developed to a different context. Probe and specify ESC issues in each relevant context. Use appropriate language and genre to extend the knowledge of a range of audiences. Apply innovatively the knowledge developed to multiple contexts. Probe and specify ESC issues that emerge broadly. Extent of Students’ Autonomy Facet o f Research Research Skill Development (RSD), a conceptual framework for Primary school to PhD, developed by John Willison and Kerry O’Regan ©, October, 2006/November, 2012. Facets based on: ANZIIL (2004) Standards & Bloom’s et al (1956) Taxonomy. * Framing researchable questions often requires a high degree of guidance and modelling for students and, initially, may need to be scaffolded as an outcome of the researching process (Facet E, Levels 1-3). After development, more students are able to initiate research (Facet A, Levels 4 & 5)*. The perpendicular font reflects the drivers and emotions of research. Framework, resources, learning modules and references available at http://www.rsd.edu.au. For info: john.willison@adelaide.edu.au when students… www.rsd.edu.au What characterises the difference between ‘search’ and ‘research’? More searching and more data generation is just a ‘biggasearch’! Research is … spiral through the facets, adding degrees of rigour and discernment as they dig and delve.
  • 15. comparison before - after 15
  • 16. outcomes 16
  • 17. 17 9% 32% 41% 14% 9% 5% 5% 9% 18% 45% 23% 50% 14% 9% 9% 18% RSDF Facet and survey question 5% 9% 55% 23% 9% 27% 36% 9% 18% A Embark and clarify distribution of answer by Extent of student autonomy c Evaluate 9% 32% 41% 14% 5% 0% 9% 9% 45% 36% 50% and reflect D Organise and manage E Analyse and synthesise F Communicate and apply 5 4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 0% 14% 5% 32% outcomes Mapping of results to RSD extent of student autonomy: Level 5 open Research Level 4 student-initiated research Level 3 scaffolded research Level 2 bounded research Level 1 prescribed research
  • 18. outcomes Mapping of results to RSD extent of student autonomy: Level 5 open Research Level 4 student-initiated research Level 3 scaffolded research Level 2 bounded research Level 1 prescribed research 18 9% 18% 41% 32% 0% 41% 41% 0% 14% 18% 50% 14% 14% 5% 5% b Find and generate 9% 9% 27% 36% 18% RSDF Facet and survey question distribution of answer by Extent of student autonomy 5 4 3 2 1 50% 1pre 1post 2 3 1 14% 9% 9% 18%
  • 19. 19 Practice: Combining Project Based Learning with the Research Skills Development Framework. Briefing educator action or requirement observed outcome research documents Students familarised with project. Key: student action Find & generate Evaluate & reflect Organise & manage Analyse & synthesise Communicate & apply rsdf implemented learning to research learning to research Researching to learn Researching to learn rsdf facets practiced Researching to learn Library tutorial. rsdf facets practiced rsdf facets practiced research Topic resolved. Find the problem. concepts Topic resolved. Find the problem. Ordinary PBL approach. (eg control group 2012). Addition of RSDf to PBL. refinement Generate details and improve against objectives. evaluation & outcomes presentation Resolved product designs presented. Embark & clarify Analyse & synthesise Communicate & apply Increase in use of scholarly references. Insights in addition to information. concept presentation Problem solving approach, as opposed to “design product x”. refinement Application of discoveries into product outcomes. outcomes 3
  • 20. the take away 3rd year Industrial Design UG students (and perhaps your students too): 20 • coped well with scaffolded research, • crave structure and research “tools”, • are highly capable of research synthesis by studio creation and reflection, • can, despite the rumours, read peer reviewed science, • just need a push in the right direction.
  • 21. thanks