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Polymeric Foams

The merchant market for polymeric (plastic) foams in the U.S. is large, and significant changes continue to occur since the last BCC report on this subject was published in 1996. Not only are foam materials and their applications constantly changing, but their manufacturing processes are as well, especially because of the need to find new foam blowing agents to replace CFCs and HCFCs. This in-depth report covers the most important technological, economic, political, and environmental factors in this broad and diverse industry. Forecasts are given for markets by applications as well as material, with focus on the largest foamed polymer group, polyurethanes (both rigid and flexible). Also included are analyses of industry structure, producers and suppliers, industry trends, and international aspects.   INTRODUCTIONSTUDY GOALS AND OBJECTIVESIn the roughly 8 years since BCC Research’s last study on the polymeric foams industry, significant changes have continued to occur in this major segment of the plastics production and processing industry. Products and markets change as technology and society change. Polymer foams find their primary applications in consumer products, such as cushioning for furniture and automobiles, thermal insulation for construction and packaging, and similar end uses that are driven by the business cycle. Most of the markets for plastic foams are the same ones that existed a few years ago; however, there have also developed some newer markets, such as cross-linked polyolefin foam in leisure and sports goods and foamed PVC in house siding, windows/doors, and other construction shapes. A more recent development is work on foams made from biopolymers and biodegradable polymers, work done in concert with efforts to reduce the country’s dependency on petroleum and natural gas, the feedstocks for the plastics that are currently foamed. Polymers are foamed for cost and performance advantages. Foamed plastics are lighter than nonfoamed articles made from the same resin; they require less resin and therefore achieve lower costs. Equally or more important, foamed plastics have properties different from nonfoamed ones, properties that often are advantageous and not attainable with nonfoamed plastics. The insulating and cushioning qualities of the gas bubbles in a foamed article are obvious attributes, but less obvious is the fact that a foamed article is often stronger than its nonfoamed analog. Thus structural shapes and forms, such as piping and wall siding, can be stronger when foamed. Markets are driven by different forces. Market drivers in recent years that have caused the most significant changes have often been environmental and public perception issues. Such issues have included:Consumer safety issues, ranging from fire resistance and flammability to concerns over the use of plastics that are often thought to be (almost always erroneously) health hazards (especially carcinogens); Solid-waste disposal and recycling, a political “hot button” of the 1990s that is not quite as hot today; andAtmospheric protection, caused by concerns and actions taken regarding blowing agents used to produce foamed plastics. This concern has taken on greater importance more recently because of global warming. Because of concerns over the Earth’s ozone layer and global warming, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foam blowing agents were banned, and their first group of replacements, (HCFCs), is also scheduled for phase-out over the future, with a total ban by 2030. The most important CFC-replacement foam blowing agent, HCFC-141b, has been banned since 2003. HFCs, the non-chlorine containing compounds that were thought to be the final replacements for CFCs, are now also under attack, not as destroyers of the ozone layer but as “super greenhouse gases,” many times more powerful than carbon dioxide in heating the atmosphere. Volatile hydrocarbon blowing agents are under increased control as a
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Polymeric Foams

  • 1. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!Polymeric FoamsPublished on August 2010 Report SummaryThe merchant market for polymeric (plastic) foams in the U.S. is large, and significant changes continue to occur since the last BCCreport on this subject was published in 1996. Not only are foam materials and their applications constantly changing, but theirmanufacturing processes are as well, especially because of the need to find new foam blowing agents to replace CFCs and HCFCs.This in-depth report covers the most important technological, economic, political, and environmental factors in this broad and diverseindustry. Forecasts are given for markets by applications as well as material, with focus on the largest foamed polymer group,polyurethanes (both rigid and flexible). Also included are analyses of industry structure, producers and suppliers, industry trends, andinternational aspects.INTRODUCTIONSTUDY GOALS AND OBJECTIVESIn the roughly 8 years since BCC Research’s last study on the polymeric foams industry, significant changes have continuedto occur in this major segment of the plastics production and processing industry. Products and markets change as technology andsociety change. Polymer foams find their primary applications in consumer products, such as cushioning for furniture andautomobiles, thermal insulation for construction and packaging, and similar end uses that are driven by the business cycle.Most of the markets for plastic foams are the same ones that existed a few years ago; however, there have also developed somenewer markets, such as cross-linked polyolefin foam in leisure and sports goods and foamed PVC in house siding, windows/doors,and other construction shapes. A more recent development is work on foams made from biopolymers and biodegradable polymers,work done in concert with efforts to reduce the country’s dependency on petroleum and natural gas, the feedstocks for theplastics that are currently foamed.Polymers are foamed for cost and performance advantages. Foamed plastics are lighter than nonfoamed articles made from thesame resin; they require less resin and therefore achieve lower costs. Equally or more important, foamed plastics have propertiesdifferent from nonfoamed ones, properties that often are advantageous and not attainable with nonfoamed plastics. The insulatingand cushioning qualities of the gas bubbles in a foamed article are obvious attributes, but less obvious is the fact that a foamed articleis often stronger than its nonfoamed analog. Thus structural shapes and forms, such as piping and wall siding, can be stronger whenfoamed.Markets are driven by different forces. Market drivers in recent years that have caused the most significant changes have often beenenvironmental and public perception issues. Such issues have included:Consumer safety issues, ranging from fire resistance andflammability to concerns over the use of plastics that are often thought to be (almost always erroneously) health hazards (especiallycarcinogens); Solid-waste disposal and recycling, a political “hot button” of the 1990s that is not quite as hot today;andAtmospheric protection, caused by concerns and actions taken regarding blowing agents used to produce foamed plastics. Thisconcern has taken on greater importance more recently because of global warming. Because of concerns over the Earth’sPolymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 1/13
  • 2. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!ozone layer and global warming, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foam blowing agents were banned, and their first group of replacements,(HCFCs), is also scheduled for phase-out over the future, with a total ban by 2030. The most important CFC-replacement foamblowing agent, HCFC-141b, has been banned since 2003. HFCs, the non-chlorine containing compounds that were thought to be thefinal replacements for CFCs, are now also under attack, not as destroyers of the ozone layer but as “super greenhousegases,” many times more powerful than carbon dioxide in heating the atmosphere. Volatile hydrocarbon blowing agents areunder increased control as air-polluting VOCs (volatile organic compounds).Our goal is to describe the most common and popular commercial polymeric foams and their applications, their technologies,competing plastic and foams as well as those made from other materials, and future industry trends. Estimates and forecast marketsare made for plastic foams of several kinds in many different important markets such as construction, transportation, and packaging.The polymers and applications covered are introduced below under Scope and Format and are discussed in greater detail in latersections of this report.REASONS FOR DOING THE STUDYPolymer foams touch our lives every day. Some applications are unseen, such as the insulating sheathing on our houses and insideour refrigerators, while some applications are in visible end uses, such as foamed seat cushions and polystyrene hot cups used forfast-food coffee. These products are important items in the economy, and because of the environmental issues previously noted,represent an interesting dynamic of the 21st-century American society.The plastic foam industry is a major segment of the American plastics industry, historically accounting for about 10% of totalcommodity resin consumption. Foamed products, such as those used for insulation and protective shipping, reduce energyconsumption and product damage and thus lead to lower manufacturing costs, less waste, and other desirable results.BCC Research first performed and has updated this study to provide a comprehensive reference for those interested and/or involvedin these products; these professionals comprise a wide and varied group of companies that make and use polymer foams, as well asprocess technology and equipment designers and marketers, politicians of all persuasions, and the general public. The information inthis report has been gleaned and condensed from a large amount of literature and other reference materials in the course of itscompilation.INTENDED AUDIENCEThis report is intended to assist those involved in several different segments of the U.S. industrial and commercial business sectors,primarily those professionals whose main interest is in thermal insulation (construction, appliances, and the like), comfort cushioning(furniture, auto seats, and other uses), transportation (other automotive parts, such as protective cushioning and bumpers), as well aspackaging applications. These professionals include those who are involved in the development, formulation, manufacture, sale, anduse of foamed polymers and polymer foaming processes; and those in ancillary businesses, such as processing equipment, additives,and other support chemicals and equipment (e.g., process and product-development experts, process and product designers,purchasing agents, construction and operating personnel, market staff, and top management). This report will be of great value totechnical and business personnel in the following areas, among others:Marketing and management personnel in companies thatproduce, market, and sell polymeric foams.Companies involved in the design and construction of process plants that manufacturepolymeric foams and those that service these plants.Companies that supply chemicals, equipment, and other materials to plasticfoam producers and users.Basic research personnel in academia, government, and industry.Financial institutions that supply moneyfor the above-mentioned facilities, including banks, merchant bankers, and venture capitalists. Such institutions need to identify andknow areas of potential trouble, as well.Personnel in end-user companies and industries; these are a wide ranging group ofcompanies in industries as varied as automobile manufacture and health care products packaging.Personnel in government at manylevels, not only at the federal level (such as the Environmental Protection Agency), but also state and local health, environmental, andother regulators who must implement and enforce the laws regarding public health and safety.SCOPE OF REPORTPolymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 2/13
  • 3. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!This BCC Research study covers in depth many of the most important technological, economic, political, and environmentalconsiderations in the U.S. polymeric foams industry. It is primarily a study of U.S. markets, but because of the global nature ofpolymer and packaging chemistry, it touches on some noteworthy international activities — primarily those that affect the U.S.,market such as the significant number of foreign firms that operate on U.S. soil.All market figures are rounded to the nearest million pounds, and all growth rates are compounded and signified as percentcompounded annual growth rates (CAGR). Because of this rounding, some growth rates may not agree exactly with figures in themarket tables, especially for differences in small volumes. All market figures are at the manufacturer’s or producer’slevel.REPORT ORGANISATIONThis report is segmented into 10 sections, beginning with this Introduction. The Summary that follows encapsulates our findings andconclusions, and includes a summary major market table. Here, the busy executive can find the major findings of the study insummary format.An Overview to the industry follows, starting with an introduction to the petrochemical industry that is the source of polymers and theplastic resin industries that make the resins that go into polymer foams. Polymeric foams are introduced and each of the majorfoamed plastics and their principal foam structures are discussed. The section ends with a discussion of some competing foammaterials, thus introducing the reader to the field of polymers and foamed plastics and foam structures.The Polymer Foam Markets by Material Type section discusses and forecasts markets for foamed plastics by type. These includethree classes of major commodity thermoplastic resins used to produce foams: polyolefins (primarily polyethylenes andpolypropylene), polystyrene and PS copolymers, and polyvinyl chloride and copolymers. The largest foamed polymer group, thepolyurethanes (PURs), comprises the major focus. Some specialty foams are included, as well as market estimates and forecasts forplastic foam blowing agents and PUR raw material isocyanates and polyols.The section begins with an overall market analysis, estimate, and forecast for the major types of polymeric foams for the base year of2009 and 5-year forecast for the 2010 and 2015 period. Each type of foam is then described in more detail with a discussion ofimportant applications and more-detailed market forecasts.The second market analysis section, Polymer Foam Markets by Applications, discusses and forecasts markets by polymer foamapplications. Applications have been categorized into seven specific major groups:Appliances, primarily thermalinsulationBuilding/construction, primarily insulation and PVC profiles/shapesElectrical/electronics, with the largest market in acousticaland noise-control foamsFurniture and furnishings, mainly comfort cushioningMedical applicationsPackaging, both functional andproduct protectionTransportation, primarily cushioning.t Organization (Continued)A group of other applications, including sportsequipment, shoe insoles and powder puffs, ends the section.The next section, Technology, starts with a review of some basic polymer chemistry, manufacture, and properties of plastics used inproducing plastic foams and then progresses on to conventional foam technologies. Some new polymer foam technologies arecovered, including new blowing agents, polyol technology, and microcellular foams. A discussion of polymer recycling technologyrounds out the Technology section.The Industry Structure and Competitive Analysis section covers the structure of the polymeric foams industry and emphasizes themajor domestic producers and suppliers, as well as trends in the industry. Some international aspects of the business are alsodiscussed and analyzed, including the global nature of the polymer foam industry, major foreign-owned supplier companies thatoperate in the U.S., and trends outside the U.S.Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 3/13
  • 4. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!The Environmental, Regulatory, and Public Policy Issues section follows, items of increasing importance to the polymer foamsindustry. Several of the most important environmental and regulatory considerations are linked, since governments around the worldseem to have decided that regulations are the best means of achieving environmental ends such as saving the earth’s ozonelayer and reducing greenhouse gases. Getting agreement on international cooperation and action is another matter.This report’s last narrative section, Company Profiles, lists many supplier companies that BCC Research considers to beamong the most important and/or best representatives of the polymer foam business.Finally, this report ends with an Appendix containing a glossary of some important terms, abbreviations, and acronyms used in thechemical, polymer, and polymer foams industries.REPORT SCOPE AND NOTATIONSome topics and materials covered in the text of this report are not specifically included in our market estimate and forecast tables. Agood example is microcellular foams, an exciting technology that is currently being commercialized; however, the technology is usedto foam the same resins, and commercial applications are already included in market figures.Copyrighted and trademarked trade names are capitalized. Generic product names are lowercase, with the exception of commonchemical acronyms, such as MDI and TDI, and plastics such as PE, PP, PVC, and PUR. Chemical formulae are sometimes used toabbreviate compounds, such as NaCl for sodium chloride (table salt).METHODOLOGY AND INFORMATION SOURCESSearches were made of the literature and the Internet. These included many leading trade publications as well as technicalgovernment compendia, and information from trade and other associations. Much product and market information was obtained fromthe principals involved in the industry. Corporate profile information was obtained primarily from the individual companies, especiallythe larger publicly owned firms. Other information sources included textbooks, directories, articles, and industry websites. Table of ContentChapter- 1: INTRODUCTION -- ComplimentarySTUDY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 1REASONS FOR DOING THE STUDY 2INTENDED AUDIENCE 3SCOPE OF REPORT 3REPORT ORGANIZATION 4REPORT ORGANIZATION (CONTINUED) 5REPORT SCOPE AND NOTATION 6METHODOLOGY AND INFORMATION SOURCES 6AUTHORS CREDENTIALS 6RELATED BCC RESEARCH 6BCC ONLINE SERVICES 7DISCLAIMER 7Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 4/13
  • 5. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!Chapter-2: SUMMARYSUMMARY 8SUMMARY (CONTINUED) 9SUMMARY TABLE POLYMERIC FOAM U.S. MARKET ESTIMATES BY RESIN FAMILY, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 10SUMMARY FIGURE POLYMERIC FOAM U.S. MARKET ESTIMATES BY RESIN FAMILY, 2009-2015 (MILLION LBS.) 10Chapter-3: OVERVIEWTHE PETROCHEMICAL AND PLASTIC RESIN INDUSTRIES 11PETROCHEMICALS 11Petrochemicals (Continued) 12Petrochemicals (Continued) 13Petrochemicals (Continued) 14PLASTIC RESINS 15History 15Modern Polymer Chemistry 16Bulk Resin Manufacture 17Plastic Resin Fabrication 17Commodity vs. Specialty Resins 18Commodity Resins 18Specialty Resins 19POLYMERIC FOAMS 19CLOSED- AND OPEN-CELL FOAMS 20POLYMER FOAM BLOWING AGENTS 21RESINS USED TO PRODUCE POLYMER FOAMS 22Phenolic Foams 22Polyolefin Foams 22Polystyrene (PS) Foams 23POLYURETHANE (PUR) FOAMS 23Polyurethane Raw Materials 24Isocyanates 24Polyols 24FLEXIBLE POLYURETHANE FOAMS 25RIGID POLYURETHANE FOAMS 25SEMI-RIGID (INTEGRAL-SKIN) PUR FOAMS 25POLYVINYL CHLORIDE (PVC) FOAMS 26STRUCTURAL FOAMS 26COMPETITIVE FOAM MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS 27NATURAL FOAM MATERIALS 27THERMOFORMED SHEET 27PAPER AND OTHER FIBER PRODUCTS 28Chapter-4: POLYMER FOAM MARKETS BY MATERIAL TYPESOVERALL MARKET ANALYSIS AND FORECAST 29TABLE 1 POLYMERIC FOAM U.S. MARKET ESTIMATES BY RESIN FAMILY, THROUGH 2015 (MILLIONS LBS.) 30Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 5/13
  • 6. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!OVERALL MARKET ANALYSIS AND (CONTINUED) 31BLOWING AGENTS 32MARKET ANALYSIS AND FORECAST 32TABLE 2 U.S. MARKET ESTIMATES FOR POLYMERIC FOAM BLOWING AGENTS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 32Market Analysis and Forecast (Continued) 33PHYSICAL BLOWING AGENTS 34CFCs, HCFCs, and HFCs 35Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) 35Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) 36Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) 37TABLE 3 FOAM BLOWING APPLICATIONS OF HCFCS AND HFCS 38TABLE 4 FOAM PRODUCTS/APPLICATIONS BLOWN WITH FLUOROCARBONS 39CFC, HCFC, and HFC Nomenclature 39Hydrocarbons 40Residues from Use of Hydrocarbon-Based Agents 41Carbon Dioxide 41Nitrogen 42Other Physical Blowing Agents 42CHEMICAL BLOWING AGENTS 42Inorganic (Endothermic) Chemical Blowing Agents 43Organic (Exothermic) Chemical Blowing Agents 43TABLE 5 TYPICAL USE OF EXOTHERMIC CHEMICAL BLOWING AGENTS BY RESIN 44TABLE 6 OPERATING TEMPERATURE RANGES FOR EXOTHERMIC BLOWING AGENTS 45TABLE 7 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR EXOTHERMIC BLOWING AGENTS 46Advantages and Disadvantages of Each Type of CBA 46TABLE 8 ADVANTAGES OF ENDOTHERMIC VS. EXOTHERMIC BLOWING AGENTS 47TABLE 9 ADVANTAGES OF EXOTHERMIC VS. ENDOTHERMIC BLOWING AGENTS 47Endo/Exo Combinations 47POLYOLEFIN FOAMS 48POLYOLEFIN FOAM MARKET ANALYSIS AND FORECAST 48TABLE 10 U.S. POLYOLEFIN FOAM MARKET ESTIMATES BY TYPE AND APPLICATION, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 49RESINS AND PROCESSES 50OVERALL MARKET ANALYSIS AND FORECAST 95TABLE 21 POLYMERIC FOAM U.S. MARKET ESTIMATES BY APPLICATION, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 95APPLIANCES 96TABLE 22 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. APPLIANCES, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 96ALTERNATIVE BLOWING AGENTS 97BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION 98TABLE 23 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. BUILDING/CONSTRUCTION, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 98TABLE 24 TYPICAL THERMAL INSULATION R VALUES 99ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS 100TABLE 25 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 100FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS 101TABLE 26 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. FURNITURE/FURNISHINGS MARKETS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 101MEDICAL APPLICATIONS 101TABLE 27 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. MEDICAL APPLICATIONS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 102PACKAGING 102Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 6/13
  • 7. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!TABLE 28 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. PACKAGING MARKETS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 103TRANSPORTATION 104TABLE 29 PLASTIC FOAMS IN U.S. TRANSPORTATION MARKETS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 104OTHER MARKETS AND APPLICATIONS 105TABLE 30 SOME MISCELLANEOUS OTHER APPLICATIONS FOR POLYMERIC FOAMS 105TABLE 30 (CONTINUED) 106TABLE 31 PLASTIC FOAMS IN MISCELLANEOUS OTHER U.S. MARKETS, THROUGH 2015 (MILLION LBS.) 106OTHER MARKETS AND APPLICATIONS (CONTINUED) 107Chapter-6: TECHNOLOGYPLASTIC RESIN CHEMISTRY, MANUFACTURE, AND PROPERTIES 108PLASTIC RESIN CHEMISTRY, (CONTINUED) 109POLYMERIC FOAM PROPERTIES AND CHARACTERISTICS 110MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 110CHEMICAL PROPERTIES 111ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES 112ACOUSTICAL PROPERTIES 112LIGHT PENETRATION 112SAFETY AND HEALTH ISSUES 112CONVENTIONAL POLYMER FOAM TECHNOLOGY 113POLYOLEFIN FOAM PROCESSES 113Extruded Polyolefin Foams 113Molded Polyolefin Foams 113Cross-Linked Polyolefin Foams 113POLYSTYRENE FOAM PROCESSES 114PS Foam Sheet Process 114PS Foam Board Process 115Expandable Bead Process 115POLYURETHANE FOAM CHEMISTRY AND PROCESSES 115Isocyanate Reactions 116Polyol Equivalent Weight and Functionality 116TABLE 32 POLYURETHANE FOAM-POLYOL DEPENDENCY BASED ON POLYOL EQUIVALENT WEIGHT AND FUNCTIONALITY117Polyurethane Foaming Processes 117Chemistry 117One-Shot System 118Two-Component (Prepolymer) System 118Quasi (Semi) Prepolymer System 118Flexible Polyurethane Foam Process 119Rigid Polyurethane Foam Process 119Non-Isocyanate Polyurethane Processes 120CELLULAR FOAM STABILIZATION 120Chemical Stabilization 120Physical Stabilization 121NEW POLYMER FOAM TECHNOLOGIES 121NEW BLOWING AGENTS 121HCFC and CFC Replacements for CFCs 122Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 7/13
  • 8. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!Hydrocarbons 123Carbon Dioxide 123Carbon Dioxide (Continued) 124Foam Blowing Without Auxiliary Blowing Agents 125Variable-Pressure Foaming 125Vacuum Forming 126NEW POLYOL TECHNOLOGY 126Impact Polyol Catalyst Technology 126MICROCELLULAR FOAMS 127Microcellular Foams (Continued) 128Microcellular Foams (Continued) 129BIOPOLYMER AND BIODEGRADABLE FOAMS 130Biopolymer and Biodegradable Foams (Continued) 131POLYMER RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY 132POLYMER RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY (CONTINUED) 133RECYCLING STATISTICS AND TRENDS 134CONVENTIONAL (MECHANICAL OR PHYSICAL) RECYCLING 134ADVANCED (CHEMICAL) RECYCLING 135Depolymerization to Monomers 135Depolymerization to Feedstocks 136Waste-to-Energy Recycling (Incineration) 137POLYURETHANE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGIES 137Automobile Recycling 138PUR Foam Recycling Technologies 139PUR Foam Recycling Technologies (Continued) 140POLYSTYRENE FOAM RECYCLING 141Polystyrene Foam Recycling (Continued) 142Chapter-7: INDUSTRY STRUCTURE AND COMPETITIVE ANALYSISTRENDS IN THE U.S. PLASTIC RESINS INDUSTRY 143PLAYERS IN THE U.S. PLASTIC FOAMS INDUSTRY 144PLAYERS IN THE U.S. PLASTIC FOAMS INDUSTRY (CONTINUED) 145STRUCTURE OF THE U.S. POLYMERIC FOAMS INDUSTRY 146BLOWING AGENT SUPPLIERS 147PHYSICAL BLOWING AGENTS 148CHEMICAL BLOWING AGENTS 148Endothermic Agents 148Exothermic Agents 148PLASTIC RESIN SUPPLIERS 149TABLE 33 U.S. COMMODITY THERMOPLASTIC RESIN PRODUCTION, THROUGH-2008 (BILLION LBS.) 150POLYURETHANE RAW MATERIAL SUPPLIERS 151ISOCYANATES 151TABLE 34 ESTIMATED VOLUMES AND MARKET SHARES OF U.S. ISOCYANATE SUPPLIERS, 2009 (MILLION LBS/%) 151POLYOLS 152POLYURETHANE FOAM SYSTEM SUPPLIERS 152FOAM FABRICATORS AND MOLDERS 152COMPANY CONSOLIDATION, RESTRUCTURING, ETC. 153Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 8/13
  • 9. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!COMPANY CONSOLIDATION, . (CONTINUED) 154INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS 155MAJOR FOREIGN PLAYERS 156TRENDS OUTSIDE THE U.S. 156New Applications for Foamed Plastics 157Environmental Aspects 157Polystyrene Foam Recovery 158Polyurethane Recycling 158Replacement of CFCs as Blowing Agents 159Chapter-8: ENVIRONMENTAL, REGULATORY, AND PUBLIC POLICY ISSUESFOAM PACKAGING ISSUES 160FOOD SERVICE 160PROTECTIVE SHIPPING PRODUCTS 161Loose-Fill 162PE Foam Compacting 163CFC- AND HCFC-REPLACEMENT ISSUES 163OZONE DEPLETION 163CHRONOLOGY OF MAJOR EVENTS 163The Clean Air Act and Amendments 163Sherwood-Molina 164United Nations Environment Programme 164Montreal Protocol 164Environmental Protection Agency 164Clean Air Act 165CFC Ban 165Ozone Layer Conference 165EPAs 1993 Final Rule and Subsequent Activities 165EPAs 1993 Final Rule and (Continued) 166OZONE-DEPLETION POTENTIAL 167OPTIONS AVAILABLE FOR HCFC REDUCTION AND REPLACEMENT 167GREENHOUSE GASES 168TABLE 35 OZONE DEPLETION AND GLOBAL WARMING POTENTIALS (FRACTION OF CFC-11 ODP = 1.0) 169POLYURETHANE RECYCLING/RECOVERY 170PERFORMANCE STANDARDS 170THERMAL INSULATING STANDARDS (R-VALUES) 171COMPRESSSIVE STRENGTH, DIMENSIONAL STABILITY 171POLYMER FOAM HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES 172FLAMMABILITY 172Polymeric Foams 172Polyurethane Foams and Raw Materials 173Flame Retardance 174Flame Retardance (Continued) 175Upholstered Furniture 176Recent Activities toward Better PUR Foam Flame Safety 177TOXICITY 178Polyurethane Foams 178Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 9/13
  • 10. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!TABLE 36 POTENTIAL HAZARDS FROM POLYURETHANE FOAM COMPONENTS 178Other Foams 179ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS 180FEDERAL 180STATE AND LOCAL 181PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS 182PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS (CONTINUED) 183Chapter-9: COMPANY PROFILESINTRODUCTION 184SUPPLIER COMPANIES 185AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC. 185AMERICAN EXCELSIOR, INC. 186AMERICHEM, INC. 187AMPACET CORPORATION 187ARCH CHEMICALS, INC. 188ARKEMA INC. 188Arkema Inc. (Continued) 189BASF CORPORATION 190BAYER MATERIAL SCIENCE LLC 190BERGEN INTERNATIONAL, LLC 191BIDDLE SAWYER CORPORATION 192ER CARPENTER COMPANY 192CELLECT LLC 193CELLOFOAM NORTH AMERICA, INC. 194CHEMTURA CORPORATION 194CLARIANT CORPORATION 195COIM USA INC. 196CREATIVE FOAM CORPORATION 196CREST FOAM INDUSTRIES, INC. 197CYLATEC, INC. 198DART CONTAINER CORPORATION 198THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY 199Polyurethanes 200Polystyrene 200Blowing Agents 200E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS AND CO. 201EFP CORPORATION 202EKA CHEMICALS INC./EXPANCEL 202ENDEX INTERNATIONAL 203EPI ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 204EVONIK FOAMS, INC. 205FERRO CORPORATION 206FOAM PRODUCTS CORPORATION 206FOAM SUPPLIES, INC. 207FOAMEX INTERNATIONAL INC./FXI 207FREE FLOW PACKAGING INTERNATIONAL, INC. 208Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 10/13
  • 11. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email!FUTURE FOAM, INC. 209GENERAL FOAM PLASTICS CORPORATION 209HICKORY SPRINGS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 210HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. 210HUNTSMAN CORPORATION 211Huntsman Corporation (Continued) 212IGLOO PRODUCTS CORP. 213ILLBRUCK, INC./PINTA ACOUSTIC, INC. 213JOHNSON CONTROLS, INC. 214KANEKA TEXAS CORPORATION 215LEAR CORPORATION 215LYONDELL BASELL INDUSTRIES NV 216PACTIV CORPORATION 217PLASTOMER CORPORATION 217REEDY INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION 218RMAX, INC. 218ROGERS CORPORATION 219RUBICON LLC 220SAINT-GOBAIN PERFORMANCE PLASTICS 220SEALED AIR CORPORATION 220SEKISUI AMERICA CORPORATION 221SPAN-AMERICA MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC. 222STEPAN COMPANY 223STOROPACK, INC. 223TECHNICAL VENTURES, INC./MORTILE INDUSTRIES, LTD. 224TEGRANT CORPORATION 224Protexic Brands 225Thermosafe Brands 225TEKNI-PLEX, INC./DOLCO PACKAGING 225TEXTILE RUBBER & CHEMICAL CO., INC. 226TORAY PLASTICS (AMERICA), INC., PEF DIVISION 227TREXEL, INC. 22820/20 CUSTOM MOLDED PLASTICS, LTD. 229UFP TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 230WOODBRIDGE SALES & ENGINEERING, INC. 230ZOTEFOAMS, INC. 231Zotefoams, Inc. (Continued) 232Chapter-10: APPENDIX: GLOSSARY OF IMPORTANT TERMS, ABBREVIATIONS, AND ACRONYMSAPPENDIX: GLOSSARY OF IMPORTANT TERMS, ABBREVIATIONS, AND ACRONYMS 233GLOSSARY 233Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 11/13
  • 12. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email! Fax Order Form To place an order via fax simply print this form, fill in the information below and fax the completed form to: Europe, Middle East and Africa : + 33 4 37 37 15 56 Asia, Oceania and America : + 1 (805) 617 17 93 If you have any questions please visit http://www.reportlinker.com/notify/contact Order Information Please verify that the product information is correct and select the format(s) you require. Polymeric Foams Product Formats Please select the product formats and the quantity you require. 1 User License--USD 4 850.00 Quantity: _____ Contact Information Please enter all the information below in BLOCK CAPITALS Title: Mr Mrs Dr Miss Ms Prof First Name: _____________________________ Last Name: __________________________________ Email Address: __________________________________________________________________________ Job Title: __________________________________________________________________________ Organization: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________ City: __________________________________________________________________________ Postal / Zip Code: __________________________________________________________________________ Country: __________________________________________________________________________ Phone Number: __________________________________________________________________________ Fax Number: __________________________________________________________________________Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 12/13
  • 13. Find Industry reports, Company profilesReportLinker and Market Statistics >> Get this Report Now by email! Payment Information Please indicate the payment method, you would like to use by selecting the appropriate box. Payment by credit card Card Number: ______________________________________________ Expiry Date __________ / _________ CVV Number _____________________ Card Type (ex: Visa, Amex…) _________________________________ Payment by wire transfer Crédit Mutuel RIB : 10278 07314 00020257701 89 BIC : CMCIFR2A IBAN : FR76 1027 8073 1400 0202 5770 189 Payment by check UBIQUICK SAS 16 rue Grenette – 69002 LYON, FRANCE Customer signature:   Please note that by ordering from Reportlinker you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions at http://www.reportlinker.com/index/terms Please fax this form to: Europe, Middle East and Africa : + 33 4 37 37 15 56 Asia, Oceania and America : + 1 (805) 617 17 93Polymeric Foams (From Slideshare) Page 13/13

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