Popular Holiday Spots (Weekend Report Presentation) Ritisha, Class-VI-C
Manali Manali at an altitude of 2,050 m (6,726 ft) in the ...
Jaisalmer Jaisalmer (Rajasthani: ), nicknamed "The Golden city...
Kovalam Kovalam is a beach town by the Arabian Sea inThiruva...
Ooty Udhagamandalam sometimes abbreviated to Udhagaiand better...
Shimla Shimla formerly known as Simla, is the capital city of ...
Ooty Udhagamandalam sometimes abbreviated to Udhagaiand better...
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Popular holiday spots

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Popular holiday spots

  • 1. Popular Holiday Spots (Weekend Report Presentation) Ritisha, Class-VI-C
  • 2. Manali Manali at an altitude of 2,050 m (6,726 ft) in the Beas River Valley is a beautiful hillstation nestled in the mountains of the Indian state of HimachalPradesh near the northern end of the Kullu Valley. It is locatedabout 270 km (168 mi) north of the state capital, Shimla. Manaliwith a population of approx. 30,000 is administratively a part ofthe Kullu district. The small town is the beginning of an ancienttrade route to Ladakh and from there over the Karakoram Pass onto Yarkand and Khotan in the Tarim Basin. In ancient times, thevalley was sparsely populated by nomadic hunters known asrakshas. The next arrivals were the shepherds who arrived fromthe Kangra Valley and settled to take up agriculture. Some of theearliest inhabitants of the region are the naur or nar, which is acaste unique to the Kullu valley. Only a few naur families areknown to exist now. A naur family in the village Soyal nearHaripur on the west bank of Manali was famous for the vast landthey owned and their practice of having rakshas as their labourers.The British introduced apple trees and trout, which were not nativeto Manali flora and fauna. It is said that when apple trees were firstplanted the fruits were so plentiful that often branches, unable tobear the weight, would collapse. To this day, apple—along withplum and pear—remains the best source of income for the majorityof its inhabitants.
  • 3. Jaisalmer Jaisalmer (Rajasthani: ), nicknamed "The Golden city", is atown in the Indian state of Rajasthan. It is located 575 kilometres(357 mi) west from the state capital Jaipur. It was once known asJaisalmer state. The town stands on a ridge of yellowish sandstone,crowned by a fort, which contains the palace and several ornateJain temples. Many of the houses and temples are finelysculptured. It lies in the heart of the Thar Desert (great Indiandesert) and has a population of about 78,000. It is theadministrative headquarters of Jaisalmer District. The majority ofthe inhabitants of Jaisalmer are Bhati Rajputs, named for Bhati,who was renowned as a warrior. This area was part of Gurjar -Pratihara empire and until the 11th century was ruled by apowerful Rajput Bargujar King. Deoraj, a famous prince of theBhati family, is esteemed the real founder of the Jaisalmer dynasty,and with him the title of rawal commenced. In 1156 Rawal Jaisal,[1] the sixth in succession from Deoraj, founded the fort and cityof Jaisalmer, and made it his capital as he moved from his formercapital at Lodhruva (which is situated about 15 km to the north-west of Jaisalmer). In 1293, the Bhattis so enraged the emperorAla-ud-din Khilji that his army captured and sacked the fort andcity of Jaisalmer, so that for some time it was quitedeserted. Some Bhattis from the Royal family migrated to Jaisal(Now in Pakistan), a place near to Chiniot Distt and some migratedto Talwandi, now Nankana Sahib in Distt. Nankana Sahib (Punjab,Pakistan) and others settled in Larkana (in Sind, Pakistan)under thename of Bhutto. In Nankana Sahib, the Bhatti Clan can be tracedfrom the lineage of Rai Bhoe and Rai Bular Bhatti.
  • 4. Kovalam Kovalam is a beach town by the Arabian Sea inThiruvananthapuram city, Kerala, India, located around 16 kmfrom the city center. Kovalam first received attention whenthe Regent Maharani Sethu Lakshmi Bayi of Travancoreconstructed her beach resort, Halcyon Castle, heretowards the end of the 1920s. Thereafter the place was brought tothe public eye by her nephew the Maharaja of Travancore. TheEuropean guests of the then Travancore kingdom discovered thepotentiality of Kovalam beach as a tourist destination in the 1930s.However, Kovalam shot into limelight in the earlyseventies with arrivals of the masses of hippies on their way toCeylon in the Hippie Trail. This exodus started the transformationof a casual fishing village of Kerala into one of the most importanttourist destinations in all India. There are a large number of beachresorts in and around Kovalam. The sea port ofVizhinjam is about 3 km away and famous for its special varietiesof fish, old Hindu temples, big churches and a mosque. TheProposed International Trans shipment Terminal at Vizhinjam isalso close to Kovalam. Kovalam was among the most prominenttourist spots in India during the hippy era. It still has a high statusamong tourists, who arrive mostly from Europe andIsrael.[citation needed] Kovalam is finding a new significance inthe light of several Ayurvedic salons, and recuperation andregeneration resorts which provide a wide variety of Ayurvedictreatments for tourists.
  • 5. Ooty Udhagamandalam sometimes abbreviated to Udhagaiand better known as Ooty, is a town, a municipality and the districtcapital of the Nilgiris district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Itis located 80 km north of Coimbatore. Ootacamund is a popularhill station located in the Nilgiri Hills. Originally occupied by theTodas, the area came under the rule of the East India Company atthe end of the 18th century. Today the towns economy is based ontourism and agriculture, with manufacturing ofmedicines and photographic film also present. The town isconnected to the rest of India by road and rail, and itshistoric sites and natural beauty attract tourists. Ooty, which isdeep within the Nilgiri hills, is also known as The Blue Mountains.It is unknown whether this name comes from the blue smoky hazegiven off by the eucalyptus trees that cover the area, or because ofthe kurunji flower, which blooms every twelve years giving theslopes a bluish tinge.[4] Nilgiris in general was ruled by Gangakings and later by Hoysala kings, particularly Vishnuvardhana whocaptured Wynad and Nilgiri area during the 11th century.[7] TippuSultan was the first to extend his border by constructing a hideoutcave like structure.[8] It was originally a tribal land and wasoccupied by the Todas along with other tribes who coexistedthrough specialisation and trade. The major tribes of Nilgiri areaare Todas, Kotas, Badagas and Alu Kurumbas,[9] who also settledin and around Ooty. The first reference of Todas in Nilgiri is foundin a record dated 1117 A.D.[7] Toda people are known for raisingwater buffaloes and Badaga people are known for farmingactivities.[8] Frederick price in his book Ootacamund, A Historystates that the area which is now called as the Old Ooty wasoriginally occupied by the Todas.
  • 6. Shimla Shimla formerly known as Simla, is the capital city of the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, located in northernIndia. It is bounded by Mandi and Kullu in the north, Kinnaur inthe east, thestate of Uttarakhand in the south-east, and Solan and Sirmaur tothe south. The elevation of the city ranges from300 to 6000 metres.[clarification needed] Shimla is well known asa hub for Indias tourism sector. It is among the top 10 preferredentrepreneurial locations in India. In 1864, Shimla was declared asthe summer capital of British India, succeeding Murree, northeastof Rawalpindi. After independence, the city became the capital ofPunjab and was later named the capital of Himachal Pradesh.Shimla came into existence from 1st Sept,1972 on thereorganisation of the districts of the state. After the reorganisation,the erstwhile Mahasu district and its major portion was mergedwith Shimla. The history of the area that now constitutes Shimladates back to the time when the Indus valley civilisation flourishedbetween 2250 and 1750 BCE.[2] Tribes such as theKoilis, Halis, Dagis, Dhaugris, Dasa, Khasas, Kinnars and Kiratsinhabited the region from pre-historic era. During the Vedicperiod, several small republics known as "Janapada" existed whichwere later conquered by the Gupta Empire.[3] After a briefperiod of supremacy by King Harshavardhana, the region was onceagain divided into several local powers headed by chieftains,including some Rajput principalities.
  • 7. Ooty Udhagamandalam sometimes abbreviated to Udhagaiand better known as Ooty, is a town, a municipality and the districtcapital of the Nilgiris district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Itis located 80 km north of Coimbatore. Ootacamund is a popularhill station located in the Nilgiri Hills. Originally occupied by theTodas, the area came under the rule of the East India Company atthe end of the 18th century. Today the towns economy is based ontourism and agriculture, with manufacturing ofmedicines and photographic film also present. The town isconnected to the rest of India by road and rail, and itshistoric sites and natural beauty attract tourists. Ooty, which isdeep within the Nilgiri hills, is also known as The Blue Mountains.It is unknown whether this name comes from the blue smoky hazegiven off by the eucalyptus trees that cover the area, or because ofthe kurunji flower, which blooms every twelve years giving theslopes a bluish tinge.[4] Nilgiris in general was ruled by Gangakings and later by Hoysala kings, particularly Vishnuvardhana whocaptured Wynad and Nilgiri area during the 11th century.[7] TippuSultan was the first to extend his border by constructing a hideoutcave like structure.[8] It was originally a tribal land and wasoccupied by the Todas along with other tribes who coexistedthrough specialisation and trade. The major tribes of Nilgiri areaare Todas, Kotas, Badagas and Alu Kurumbas,[9] who also settledin and around Ooty. The first reference of Todas in Nilgiri is foundin a record dated 1117 A.D.[7] Toda people are known for raisingwater buffaloes and Badaga people are known for farmingactivities.[8] Frederick price in his book Ootacamund, A Historystates that the area which is now called as the Old Ooty wasoriginally occupied by the Todas.

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