Giftedness: The Gift that Keeps on Giving
Introduction Stable versus unstable personal traits  e.g. gender versus hair color Which is giftedness? Oft...
Google results “gifted children” →1,440,000 hits versus post-childhood:  “gifted adolescents” → 39,600 hits ...
Google results and versus pre-childhood:  “gifted babies” → 6,660 hits  “gifted infants” → 540 hits  ...
Argument Giftedness can be a life-long trait  This developmental continuity is especially conspicuous when...
PERFORMANCE Top 1% Superlative Performance Threshold ...
From Conception toReputation Genetic conception Gestation Infancy Childhood Adolescence Adulthood Dea...
Genetic conception
Genetic conception It all begins with the “gifted zygote” Galton’s 1869 Hereditary Genius Modern behavioral genet...
Gestation
Gestation Intrauterine environment e.g., Geschwind’s theory  elevated testosterone after 20th week  ...
Infancy
Infancy The Developmental “Dark Ages”  Early developmental signposts not always indicative of later gifted...
Fagan Test of InfantIntelligence Attention to novelty at 6-12 months predicts  adult IQ  academic achieveme...
Cox (1926) 301 Geniuses Jeremy Bentham: English jurist and utilitarian philosopher (early IQ 180)  Learned ...
Feldman/Goldsmith(1986/2000) 6 prodigies a child who read music before he was four, two children who played winning ...
Winner (1996): Gifted Children Michael Kearney  speak at 4 months;  read at 8 months;  algebra on own...
SMPY (Julian Stanley et al.) Terry Tao: Fields Medal recipient  taught himself to read before 2;  using por...
Childhood
Childhood Dark Ages rarely end before ages 2-3, and more commonly end at the age of a late preschooler or kinderg...
Childhood During this age period various environmental factors kick in including  Birth order (not prenatal...
Adolescence
Adolescence Although the previously mentioned factors continue to nurture growth, the gifted youth can also be le...
Adulthood
Adulthood The Great Transformation from  Input to Output  Potential to Actual Achievement  Giftedness...
Adulthood Accelerated career onset  Abbreviated expertise acquisition (< 10 years)  Early achievement (viz....
Examples Cervantes: Don Quixote, Part II, age 68, died age 69
Examples Galileo: Two New Sciences, age 74, died age 78
Examples Goethe: Faust, Part II, age 83, died age 83
Examples Verdi: Falstaff, age 85, died age 88
Death
Death Life expectancy as contingent on achievement domain Examples:  Mathematicians versus Biologists  ...
Genius Age 1st Age at masterwork death Arriaga 18 20 (music) Galois 20 ...
Posthumous reputation
Posthumous reputation Eventual eminence is a direct function of lifetime achievement, which is most often defined...
Hence … Giftedness can become the gift that keeps on giving! even longer lasting than …
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Nagc Test

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nagc Test

  • 1. Giftedness: The Gift that Keeps on Giving
  • 2. Introduction Stable versus unstable personal traits  e.g. gender versus hair color Which is giftedness? Often viewed as a childhood attribute This reflected by a recent web search What are the results of googling … ?
  • 3. Google results “gifted children” →1,440,000 hits versus post-childhood:  “gifted adolescents” → 39,600 hits  “gifted teenagers” → 1,670 hits  “gifted adults” → 24,700 hits  “gifted elderly” → 56 hits  “gifted senior citizens” → 8 hits
  • 4. Google results and versus pre-childhood:  “gifted babies” → 6,660 hits  “gifted infants” → 540 hits  “gifted zygotes” → 1 hit  the latter some Jon Stewart quip!
  • 5. Argument Giftedness can be a life-long trait  This developmental continuity is especially conspicuous when we look at the highest levels of giftedness  e.g., top 1% rather than top 10%
  • 6. PERFORMANCE Top 1% Superlative Performance Threshold Top 10% AGE
  • 7. From Conception toReputation Genetic conception Gestation Infancy Childhood Adolescence Adulthood Death Posthumous reputation
  • 8. Genetic conception
  • 9. Genetic conception It all begins with the “gifted zygote” Galton’s 1869 Hereditary Genius Modern behavioral genetics: Giftedness is most likely  multi-polygenic (many polygenic traits)  emergenic (multiplicative/configurational)  epigenetic (unfolds over time) In short, a complex, dynamic process
  • 10. Gestation
  • 11. Gestation Intrauterine environment e.g., Geschwind’s theory  elevated testosterone after 20th week  right > left posterior hemisphere growth  giftedness/savantism  mathematical ability  artistic/spatial ability  musical ability Simon Baron-Cohen: “extreme male brain”
  • 12. Infancy
  • 13. Infancy The Developmental “Dark Ages”  Early developmental signposts not always indicative of later giftedness  and may even be counter-indicative (e.g., delayed speech) So when do the Dark Ages end? What’s the earliest age at which the gift begins to manifest itself?
  • 14. Fagan Test of InfantIntelligence Attention to novelty at 6-12 months predicts  adult IQ  academic achievement but this assessment concerns general intelligence (Spearman’s g) What about more domain-specific indicators?
  • 15. Cox (1926) 301 Geniuses Jeremy Bentham: English jurist and utilitarian philosopher (early IQ 180)  Learned alphabet before talking  At 3 began classical education when father buys a Latin grammar; same age read Rapin’s History of England
  • 16. Feldman/Goldsmith(1986/2000) 6 prodigies a child who read music before he was four, two children who played winning chess before they entered school, another who studied abstract algebra in grade school, a youngster who produced typed scripts of original stories and plays before his fifth birthday, and a child who read, wrote, began learning foreign languages, and composed short musical pieces before he was out of diapers.
  • 17. Winner (1996): Gifted Children Michael Kearney  speak at 4 months;  read at 8 months;  algebra on own at age 3 KyLee Hench  fascinated with letters & numbers at 1.5  mental arithmetic at 2  playing math computer games by 3
  • 18. SMPY (Julian Stanley et al.) Terry Tao: Fields Medal recipient  taught himself to read before 2;  using portable typewriter before 2.5;  solved math problems typical of 8-year olds by 3.
  • 19. Childhood
  • 20. Childhood Dark Ages rarely end before ages 2-3, and more commonly end at the age of a late preschooler or kindergartner even Mozart didn’t begin composing until 5 (with father’s help) and J. S. Mill didn’t write his first book (a history of Rome) until 6.5 (juvenilia)
  • 21. Childhood During this age period various environmental factors kick in including  Birth order (not prenatal!)  Traumatic, enriching, and diversifying events  Domain-specific role models and mentors, and  Expertise acquisition (10-year rule) that affect the type and degree of giftedness The “gift” as a nature-nurture collaboration
  • 22. Adolescence
  • 23. Adolescence Although the previously mentioned factors continue to nurture growth, the gifted youth can also be led astray from the path of optimal development: Peer groups become especially critical during this phase e.g., Csikszentmihalyi et al.’s (1993) Talented teenagers
  • 24. Adulthood
  • 25. Adulthood The Great Transformation from  Input to Output  Potential to Actual Achievement  Giftedness to Genius
  • 26. Adulthood Accelerated career onset  Abbreviated expertise acquisition (< 10 years)  Early achievement (viz. 1st “hit” in 20s) Exceptional productivity or output (e.g., Napoleon, Edison, Picasso, Mozart) High impact (e.g., disciples, honors) Long, productive career Early- + late-bloomers << long-bloomers Hence, last testaments, old-age style shifts, swan-songs
  • 27. Examples Cervantes: Don Quixote, Part II, age 68, died age 69
  • 28. Examples Galileo: Two New Sciences, age 74, died age 78
  • 29. Examples Goethe: Faust, Part II, age 83, died age 83
  • 30. Examples Verdi: Falstaff, age 85, died age 88
  • 31. Death
  • 32. Death Life expectancy as contingent on achievement domain Examples:  Mathematicians versus Biologists  Poets versus Novelists  Military versus Political Leaders  Revolutionary versus Status Quo Politicians Precocity negative impact on longevity
  • 33. Genius Age 1st Age at masterwork death Arriaga 18 20 (music) Galois 20 20 (math)Chatterton 16 17 (poetry)
  • 34. Posthumous reputation
  • 35. Posthumous reputation Eventual eminence is a direct function of lifetime achievement, which is most often defined by the quality and quantity of output or impact As a result, the highest degrees of eminence are consistent across space and stable through time
  • 36. Hence … Giftedness can become the gift that keeps on giving! even longer lasting than …

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