POLITICAL
ECONOMY
MECM10003, WEEK FOUR, LECTURE TWO
POLITICAL ECONOMY…
- Or, „how the economy is political.‟
- Or, „how does ownership of things have an effect on the
daily l...
A SHORT HISTORY OF
A COMPLEX CONCEPT
- Aristotle and home economics.
- Adam Smith and national wealth.
- Marx and the idea...
THREE IMPORTANT THINGS
FOR POLITICAL ECONOMY
1. Economic ownership is centralized, and this
has political consequences.
2....
ASSUMPTIONS OF CRITICAL
‘POEC’ MEDIA THEORY
1. That the economy is not a neutral and separate sphere of
society, but inter...
WHAT CRITICAL ‘POEC’
TELLS US
1. That news and entertainment media is largely centrally
controlled.
2. That we have very l...
GENERAL EXAMPLES
- News Corporation and Fairfax Holdings, and their
ownership of large amounts of Australian media network...
POLITICAL ECONOMY
AND MEDIA PT.1
Questions of ownership:
- Who owns the content we see and the
communication networks that...
POLITICAL ECONOMY
AND MEDIA PT.2
Media commodities:
- If you can‟t tell what the commodity is, it‟s
probably you.
Michael ...
EXAMPLE:
‘MONSTERS INC.’ (2001)
A children‟s story about
the evils of capitalism,
and how it was replaced
with communistic...
EXAMPLE:
‘NETWORK’ (1976)
About a newsreader who becomes the „prophet of the
television‟ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M...
HOW POEC CRITICIZES
OTHER THEORIES
- The public sphere is impossible because most media texts
come from people with vested...
BUT…
- Control of content is not the same as control of
interpretation.
- Political economic theories generally ignore non...
HOW IS IT USEFUL?
Maybe it is,
because it is concerned with attributes of a text that
are not apparent, and how these attr...
POLITICAL ECONOMY
AND CULTURE
“[T]he interrelationship of culture and the economic here is
not a one-way street but a cont...
Political economy in Media studies
of 16

Political economy in Media studies

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Economy & Finance      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Political economy in Media studies

  • 1. POLITICAL ECONOMY MECM10003, WEEK FOUR, LECTURE TWO
  • 2. POLITICAL ECONOMY… - Or, „how the economy is political.‟ - Or, „how does ownership of things have an effect on the daily life of a society?‟ - Or, „how does the allocation of economic resources and surplus capital influence the aggregate economic activity of a society?‟ - For us: „how do channels of ownership affect the media?‟
  • 3. A SHORT HISTORY OF A COMPLEX CONCEPT - Aristotle and home economics. - Adam Smith and national wealth. - Marx and the idea of exploitation.
  • 4. THREE IMPORTANT THINGS FOR POLITICAL ECONOMY 1. Economic ownership is centralized, and this has political consequences. 2. Media content is less significant than media ownership – economics is more important than ideology. 3. The working class always loses.
  • 5. ASSUMPTIONS OF CRITICAL ‘POEC’ MEDIA THEORY 1. That the economy is not a neutral and separate sphere of society, but interrelated with politics and culture. 2. That a scientific analysis of the economy shows that it is exploitative of the working class. 3. That the political situation is unlikely to change unless the economic situation also changes.
  • 6. WHAT CRITICAL ‘POEC’ TELLS US 1. That news and entertainment media is largely centrally controlled. 2. That we have very little choice in our sources of information. 3. That every purchase we make reinforces this situation.
  • 7. GENERAL EXAMPLES - News Corporation and Fairfax Holdings, and their ownership of large amounts of Australian media networks. - Elsewhere: Berlusconi‟s ownership of Italian media; Roosevelt‟s control of US media leading to his US presidency continuing for four terms. - The centralization of film or television production, for instance: Viacom, Disney. - We can also think about the centralization of software and social networking sites: Microsoft, facebook, and Apple - Often, conspiracy theories operate along the lines of a confused account of political economy.
  • 8. POLITICAL ECONOMY AND MEDIA PT.1 Questions of ownership: - Who owns the content we see and the communication networks that we use? and - Who is profiting from the sale of media texts? and - Who is selling us as an audience?
  • 9. POLITICAL ECONOMY AND MEDIA PT.2 Media commodities: - If you can‟t tell what the commodity is, it‟s probably you. Michael Moore, (Bowling for Columbine, Sicko): - “The rich man will sell you the rope to hang him with.” (Interview in The Corporation, 2003)
  • 10. EXAMPLE: ‘MONSTERS INC.’ (2001) A children‟s story about the evils of capitalism, and how it was replaced with communistic workers‟ paradise.
  • 11. EXAMPLE: ‘NETWORK’ (1976) About a newsreader who becomes the „prophet of the television‟ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTN3s2iVKKI
  • 12. HOW POEC CRITICIZES OTHER THEORIES - The public sphere is impossible because most media texts come from people with vested economic interests – and there is no neutral space for discussion. - Media effects may be real, but the most significant effects of oppression come from the economy. - It is irrelevant whether a medium allows for a great degree of interactivity or communication: you don‟t own it, so you don‟t control it. Any control you have you have to pay for somehow.
  • 13. BUT… - Control of content is not the same as control of interpretation. - Political economic theories generally ignore non- economic forms of oppression, such as sexism or racism. - Generally ignores the real differences between different media forms in favour of a broad overview. - Assumes that there is very little space for things to be otherwise. How can you resist?
  • 14. HOW IS IT USEFUL? Maybe it is, because it is concerned with attributes of a text that are not apparent, and how these attributes have influence on a society‟s social and cultural concerns. Or maybe it isn’t, because it ignores the ideological content of text in favour of identifying a purely economic relationship between a text and an audience.
  • 15. POLITICAL ECONOMY AND CULTURE “[T]he interrelationship of culture and the economic here is not a one-way street but a continuous reciprocal interaction and feedback loop.” (Jameson, 1991: xiv-xv)