Polluti
What is Pollution ?
Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into the natural
environment that cause adverse change. ...
INDEX
• Air pollution
• Water pollution
• Land pollution
• Global Warming
Air Pollution
Some air pollutants that are released into the atmosphere by man-
made activities pose environmental and hea...
Reactions in Air Pollution
A well-known secondary photochemical pollutant is ozone (O3). Its
formation results from the su...
Air Pollution in Pictures
Water Pollution
Water pollution occurs when undesirable foreign substances are
introduced into natural water. The substanc...
Reactionsin Water Pollution
Pollutants in water are commonly measured and reported as parts
per million (ppm) or parts per...
Water Pollution in Pictures
Land Pollution
Land pollution is contaminating the land surface of the earth by
dumping waste. Human beings take part in m...
Reactionsin Land Pollution
Modern fertilizer consists of varying amounts of nitrogen (N),
phosphorus (P) and potassium (K)...
Land Pollutionin Pictures
Global Warming
Global warming is the unequivocal and continuing rise in the
average temperature of Earth's climate system....
Global Warming in Pictures
Pollution and Global Warming
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Pollution and Global Warming

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Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
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Transcripts - Pollution and Global Warming

  • 1. Polluti
  • 2. What is Pollution ? Pollution is the introduction of contaminants into the natural environment that cause adverse change. Pollution can take the form of chemical substances or energy, such as noise, heat or light. Pollutants, the components of pollution, can be either foreign substances/energies or naturally occurring contaminants. Pollution is often classed as point source or nonpoint source pollution
  • 3. INDEX • Air pollution • Water pollution • Land pollution • Global Warming
  • 4. Air Pollution Some air pollutants that are released into the atmosphere by man- made activities pose environmental and health risks directly. These primary pollutants include carbon monoxide, particulate matter, nitrogen oxides and lead, emitted from exhausts of road vehicles. Additional impacts, however, result from the conversion of primary pollutants by a complex series of chemical reactions in the atmosphere, to secondary pollutants. Since much of the pollutant chemistry is driven by the presence of sunlight, the secondary products are commonly referred to as photochemical pollutants.
  • 5. Reactions in Air Pollution A well-known secondary photochemical pollutant is ozone (O3). Its formation results from the sunlight-initiated oxidation (reaction with oxygen) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene in the presence of nitrogen oxides(NOx), mostly nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Once formed, ozone is scavenged by NO, and in the absence of other competing reactions, a "photo stationary state" is formed where concentrations of NO, NO2 and O3 are all inter-related.
  • 6. Air Pollution in Pictures
  • 7. Water Pollution Water pollution occurs when undesirable foreign substances are introduced into natural water. The substances may be chemical or biological in nature. Common pollutants include human or animal waste; disease-producing organisms; radioactive materials; toxic metals such as lead or mercury; agricultural chemicals such as pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizers; acid rain ; and high-temperature water discharged from power plants, often called "thermal pollution." Pollutants in water are dangerous for human or animal consumption and harm crops. High temperatures may cause algae to grow rapidly, rendering water unfit for consumption.
  • 8. Reactionsin Water Pollution Pollutants in water are commonly measured and reported as parts per million (ppm) or parts per billion (ppb). A solution that contains 2 grams(0.071 ounces) of lead in 1 million grams (2,205 pounds) of water (1,000 liters, or 264.2 gallons) is a 2 ppm solution. A 1 ppb solution of calcium contains 1 gram (0.036 ounces) of calcium in 1 billion grams (2,205,000 pounds) of water. A concentration of 1 ppm is the same as 1 milligram(3.6 × 10 −5 ounces) per liter. Acid rain is a widespread term used to describe all forms of acid precipitation (rain, snow, hail, fog, etc.). Atmospheric pollutants, particularly oxides of sulphur and nitrogen, can cause precipitation to become more acidic when converted to sulphuric and nitric acids, hence the term acid rain. Acid deposition, acid rain and acid precipitation all relate to the chemistry of air pollution and moisture in the atmosphere.
  • 9. Water Pollution in Pictures
  • 10. Land Pollution Land pollution is contaminating the land surface of the earth by dumping waste. Human beings take part in making land pollution Some examples are: Soil Pollution – mainly due to chemicals in herbicides (weed killers) and pesticides (poisons which kill insects and other invertebrate pests). Waste Disposal – waste threatens the health of people in residential areas. It encourages household pests and turns urban areas into unsightly, dirty and unhealthy places to live in.
  • 11. Reactionsin Land Pollution Modern fertilizer consists of varying amounts of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). These three are believed to be essential for plants to grow, (below, I’ll discuss why NPK may not be as necessary as we think.), and are extracted from the soil with each harvest. This is why farmers spread fertilizer on their fields, to replace the nutrients lost. It’s certainly not the ideal and sustainable way to farm, but it’s thought to be the most efficient for large-scale farms. Strategies like crop rotation and allowing large fields to rest would cut too deep into profits that are based on quantity, opposed to quality.
  • 12. Land Pollutionin Pictures
  • 13. Global Warming Global warming is the unequivocal and continuing rise in the average temperature of Earth's climate system. Since 1971, 90% of the increased energy has been stored in the oceans, mostly in the 0 to 700m region. Since the early 20th century, the global air and sea surface temperature has increased about 0.8 °C (1.4 °F), with about two- thirds of the increase occurring since 1980. Each of the last three decades has been successively warmer at the Earth's surface than any preceding decade since 1850. The greenhouse effect is the process by which absorption and emission of infrared radiation by gases in a planet's atmosphere warm its lower atmosphere and surface. It was proposed by Joseph Fourier in 1824, discovered in 1860 by John Tyndall, was first investigated quantitatively by Svante Arrhenius in 1896, and was developed in the 1930s through 1960s by Guy Stewart Callendar
  • 14. Global Warming in Pictures