1
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
101 CRITICAL DAYS OF SUMMER
The summer months are upon us and with tha...
2
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
HELP PREVENT PRESCRIPTION DRUG MISUSE
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prev...
3
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
“YOU DRINK TOO MUCH.” WHAT TO SAY – AND WHAT NOT TO SAY – TO ADDRESS
Y...
4
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
DO YOU DRINK TOO MUCH?
You may have a drinking problem if you...
 Fee...
5
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
DEA’S NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG
TAKE-BACK DAYS MEET A GROWING
NEED FO...
6
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
ORDER KEEP WHAT YOU’VE EARNED MATERIALS FOR
THE SUMMER
Posters
Feature...
7
Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014
DEFY PROGRAMS BEGIN THIS SUMMER
Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) is a c...
of 7

NADAP E Gram May 2014

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NADAP E Gram May 2014

  • 1. 1 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 101 CRITICAL DAYS OF SUMMER The summer months are upon us and with that the number of alcohol incidents and accidents increase significantly. To assist in reducing incidents, NADAP’s “Keep What You’ve Earned” campaign and the Naval Safety Center’s “Live to Play, Play to Live” summer safety campaign are partnering to urge Sailors to drink responsibly this summer—and always. Here are a few ideas that everyone can do: • Take the “Play to Live Pledge”: As a commitment to drinking responsibly, all Navy personnel and their families are encouraged to sign the Play to Live Pledge. Alcohol abuse prevention personnel can promote the pledge among their commands to further create a safer environment for all this summer. https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SummerPledge2014 • Event-in-a-Box: Provides step-by-step instructions and where to access resources to hold a “101 Days of Summer” kickoff splash event at any installation, including how to work with the base PAO and photographer on setting up a photo booth, where to access the printable speech bubble, how to encourage Sailors to take the online pledge, customizable templates for event announcements and flyers, and talking points for Navy leadership • Use social media messaging: Provides weekly social media messages, multimedia and hash tags for use on Navy-owned social media accounts such as base and ship Facebook pages and ADCO twitter accounts. • Promote the “Pier Pressure” Mobile App: Features a game to help Sailors understand the effects of their drinking habits and learn how to recognize their limit and drink responsibly. Available on Apple and Android-supported devices. • Order print materials: Features the campaign message and taglines. For display in common areas on and off base, including local restaurants and bars on and off installations. All materials are available for order through the Navy Logistics Library. IN THIS ISSUE 1 101 CRITICAL DAYS OF SUMMER 2 HELP PREVENT PRESCRIPTION DRUG MISUSE 3 “YOU DRINK TOO MUCH.” WHAT TO SAY 4 DO YOU DRINK TOO MUCH? 5 DEA’S TAKE-BACK DAYS 6 KWYE MATERIALS FOR THE SUMMER 7 DEFY PROGRAMS BEGIN THIS SUMMER NAVY ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION (NADAP) MAY 2014
  • 2. 2 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 HELP PREVENT PRESCRIPTION DRUG MISUSE Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention, part of the 21st Century Sailor Office, launched a new campaign last month aimed at preventing prescription drug misuse, called “Prescription for Discharge.” The use of prescription drugs is on the rise, increasing the potential for misuse and abuse. In the past three years, amphetamine positives have increased 34 percent and oxycodone positives by 23 percent on Navy samples tested for these drugs. Despite the Navy’s strict “no tolerance” policy, more than 1,000 Sailors tested positive for illegal prescription drug use in the past two years. Prescription drug misuse puts Sailors’ lives and missions at risk, undercuts unit readiness and morale, and goes against the Navy and Marine Corps’ ethos and core values. Although prescription drugs are a legal, safe method of treating injury and illness when taken as prescribed by a physician, improper use is both illegal and dangerous—and in some cases deadly. The primary focus of the Prescription for Discharge campaign is to educate Sailors and their family members on the safe and proper use of prescription drugs, and the health and career risks of misuse. The campaign features four primary steps for the proper use of prescription drugs: 1. Take correctly. Follow the doctor’s orders and prescription instructions as directed. 2. Report promptly. Ensure that both Navy Medical and your command are aware of your current prescriptions. 3. Dispose properly. Place unused meds in small plastic bag with used coffee grounds or another undesirable substance and throw the bag in the trash. Cross out personal information on your prescription labels. 4. Never share. Never share your prescriptions with a friend, shipmate, or family member. As part of the Prescription for Discharge campaign, Navy Medical providers and drug abuse prevention personnel now have access to resources including: • Print materials such as fact sheets, posters, flyers, and table tents for display at medical facilities, • A campaign implementation guide providing step-by-step instructions on how to utilize the resources, • Digital media including a website and social media messaging, and • Tools for medical providers and leadership’s interactions with patients and their commands. • Campaign promotional activities and events will continue throughout the year as additional campaign products are released and in conjunction with the Navy and Marine Corps’ recognized awareness months and events. Navy personnel can find more information about the Prescription for Discharge campaign on the NADAP website, available at www.nadap.navy.mil
  • 3. 3 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 “YOU DRINK TOO MUCH.” WHAT TO SAY – AND WHAT NOT TO SAY – TO ADDRESS YOUR FRIEND OR FAMILY MEMBERS’ ALCOHOL USE Posted on April 14, 2014 by Military Pathways The following post is based on an article by Lisa Frederiksen, titled, “What to Say to Someone With a Drinking Problem,” that first appeared on her blog, www.BreakingtheCycles.com, on February16, 2014. For those of us who have a close friend or family member with an undiagnosed drinking problem, you know the challenges of talking to someone about his or her drinking. People who rely on alcohol often become adept at deflecting comments about their drinking and have an excuse for everything. Perhaps you have tried before and heard excuses such as: • You drink, too. Why is it any different for me? What’s the big deal? • A couple of drinks a night aren’t a problem. • I only drink on the weekends. Because of these common responses, it’s important to be able to express to the person exactly why you think his or her alcohol use is problematic. Try to be specific and clear with statements such as: • I don’t know if you are aware of what happens when you drink, but yesterday you ____. • I’ve been doing some internet searching trying to figure out if I should say anything about how you behave when you drink too much and found some great resources. I’d really like you to do the anonymous alcohol use self-assessment at DrinkingIQ.org. It specializes in addressing alcohol use among service members, veterans, and their families. • I think you have alcoholism – I say this so boldly because I’d never understood what alcoholism was before, but now I’ve been doing some research, and it appears you may have it. I’d really like you to take this anonymous assessment at www.DrinkingIQ.org • I’ve finally found a name for what happens to me when you behave the way you do while drinking – it’s called secondhand drinking. I’m going to be learning more about this, but I wanted you to know that the way you act when you drink is causing real problems for me. I’m not sure what to do about it, but I also understand that my old ways of talking about this don’t work, either. It is also important to know what NOT to say, such as: • You’re a drunk! • Do you know how stupid you sounded last night? • Once again, you broke your promise. • If you loved me you’d stop. While these are all things that are tempting to say and it is certainly understandable why someone would say them, they are shaming, and will more likely put the person on the defensive than doing anything constructive. You don’t want to upset the person or put them on the defensive before the conversation even starts. Tell him or her that you plan to do more research and will follow up – and set a time to talk. Also explain that you are doing this out of love. See more at: http://www.militarymentalhealth.org
  • 4. 4 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 DO YOU DRINK TOO MUCH? You may have a drinking problem if you...  Feel guilty or ashamed about your drinking  Lie to others about alcohol use and/or hide your drinking habits  Have friends or family members who are worried about your drinking  Need to drink in order to relax or de-stress or feel better  “Black out” or forget what you did while you were drinking  Regularly drink more than you intend  Repeatedly neglect your responsibilities at home, work, or school because of drinking  Use alcohol in situations where it’s physically dangerous, such as drinking and driving, operating machinery while intoxicated, or mixing alcohol with prescription medication against doctor’s orders  Experience repeated legal problems on account of your drinking. (DUI, drunk and disorderly conduct)  Continue to drink even though your alcohol use is causing problems in your relationships If you said “yes” to one or more of the above, you may be abusing alcohol. If you think you have a drinking problem, please contact Department of Defense medical personnel, chaplain, Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor (DAPA), Fleet and Family Support Center counselors, Navy alcohol and drug counselors, or CO, XO, OIC or CMDCM/COB (Chief of the Boat). TIPS FOR CUTTING BACK ON ALCOHOL  Keep track of how much you drink  Write a list of reasons why you want to cut back on alcohol use  Count and measure your drinks accurately using standard measurements. 1 drink=  12 fl. oz. of regular beer OR  8-9 fl. oz. of malt liquor OR  5 fl. oz. of table wine OR  1.5 fl. oz. of 80-proof spirits/hard liquor  Set a limit on the number of times per day or days per week you will drink  Get support from friends and family to help you reduce drinking  Talk to a professional if you have difficulty cutting back or quitting alcohol  Pace yourself, sip slowly and ensure you drink no more than one standard drink/hour (See standards above)  Eat food while drinking; this will allow the alcohol to be absorbed by your body at a slower rate  Find alternatives to drinking: healthy activities, hobbies or socializing with non- drinkers  Identify and avoid triggers such as people, places or things that contribute to your alcohol use  Develop a plan to deal with urges; talk to someone that is encouraging and motivating Article provided by Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center. To learn how their programs can help keep you fit for service and improve your overall health, visit http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/health- promotion/Pages/default.aspx
  • 5. 5 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 DEA’S NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG TAKE-BACK DAYS MEET A GROWING NEED FOR AMERICANS MAY 08 (WASHINGTON)–Americans nationwide showed their support for the United States Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA’s) National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day program by dropping off more prescription pills than ever this past Saturday. After seven previous Take Back Days spread over almost four years, 780,158 pounds (390 tons) of pills were brought to the 6,072 collection sites that DEA and its 4,423 state, local, and tribal law enforcement partners set up on April 26 so the public could discard unwanted, unused and expired prescription drugs from medicine cabinets, bedside tables, and kitchen drawers. When added to that collected at previous DEA-coordinated Take-Back events, 4.1 million pounds (2,123 tons) of prescription medications have been removed from circulation. “DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take-Back events provide an obviously needed and valued service to the public, while also reducing prescription drug abuse and trafficking,” said DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart. “By taking these medications off their hands, our citizens know they have made their own families and communities safer. We continue to work toward making the process for disposing of controlled substance medications by users and their caregivers even easier by creating regulations that will enable the public to regularly, safely, and conveniently dispose of such medicines when they are no longer needed or wanted.” The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, secure, and environmentally responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse and trafficking of medications. This is important because the non-medical use of controlled substance (CS) medications is at an all-time high, with 6.8 million Americans reporting having abused prescription drugs in 2012, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) released in 2013. That same study revealed more than 54 percent of people who abuse prescription pain relievers got them through friends or relatives, a statistic that includes raiding the family medicine cabinet. The DEA’s Take-Back events are a significant piece of the Obama administration’s strategy for preventing prescription drug abuse and trafficking, which also includes education of health care providers, patients, parents and youth; enhancing and encouraging the establishment of prescription drug monitoring programs in all the states; and increased enforcement to address doctor shopping and pill mills. Take-Back Days are presently needed because the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) as originally written did not provide a way for patients, caregivers, and pet owners to dispose of such CS medications as painkillers, sedatives, and stimulants like ADHD drugs. People were flushing their old meds down the toilet or throwing them in the trash. DEA launched its first Take-Back event in September 2010, after which the President signed the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 2010, which amended the CSA to allow people, including residents of long term care facilities, to regularly, conveniently, and safely dispose of their CS medications by delivering them to entities authorized by the Attorney General to accept them. DEA is in the process of finalizing regulations to implement the Act, publishing on December 21, 2012, a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on the Disposal of Controlled Substances that presented possible disposal options. Date of Take-Back Day Pounds Collected Sept. 25, 2010 242,000 April 30, 2011 376,593 October 29, 2011 377,086 April 28, 2012 552,161 Sept. 29, 2012 488,395 April 27, 2013 742,497 Oct. 26, 2013 647,211 April 26, 2014 780,158
  • 6. 6 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 ORDER KEEP WHAT YOU’VE EARNED MATERIALS FOR THE SUMMER Posters Features the campaign message and taglines. For display in common areas on and off base, including Exchanges, Galleys, gyms and local community businesses, and tailored to each of the five Navy communities. Visit Navy Logistics Library at https://nll2.ahf.nmci.navy.mil/ Fact Sheets Provides an overview of the Keep What You’ve Earned campaign and how to get involved. Available for five different audiences and stakeholders. Weekly Leadership Messaging Includes a set of 52 alcohol-related messages for the 52 weeks in a year. Leaders can share these messages with Sailors at liberty briefings or other regularly scheduled interactions. Social Media Calendar Provides weekly social media messages, multimedia and hashtags for use on Navy-owned social media accounts such as base and ship Facebook pages and twitter accounts. Video Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Features a variety of videos highlighting how hard Sailors have worked for their careers and how they can drink responsibly to keep what they've earned. Pier Pressure Features a game to help Sailors understand the effects of their drinking habits and learn how to recognize their limit and drink responsibly. Available on Apple and Android- supported devices. Digital Marquee Graphics Features Keep What You've Earned graphics and text for digital marquees. Work with the manager of the marquee or PAO at your installation to display. Event-In-A-Box Implementation Guide for Summer Splash Events To enable commands to host summer splash events at their installations and incorporate KWYE messaging into their existing summer safety fairs and safety standdowns, The Keep What You've Earned Training Series The Keep What You've Earned training series provides ADCOs, DAPAs, and other Navy leadership with the tools they need to convey information about drinking responsibly to Sailors during trainings, Safety Stand downs, and other briefings. Coasters and table tents Features responsible drinking tips and facts. Use these coasters to reach Sailors at various locations including local bars and clubs, the bowling center, and the barracks. NADAP WEBINARS All webinars begin at 1300-1400 (CDT). An additional webinar is available at 1700 (CDT) Click the link below to join the webinar. https://connect.dco.d od.mil/nadapwebinar1 If you do not already have a Defense Connect Online (DCO) account, we would strongly recommend creating an account prior to the event. To setup a DCO account, visit https://www.dco.dod.mil and select "register" at the top left hand corner of the page. WEBINAR SCHEDULE Date Subject 15 MAY Keep What You’ve Earned and Alcohol Awareness Month 5 JUN Urinalysis Compliance Reporting 26 JUN Positive Urinalysis Determination
  • 7. 7 Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention | May 2014 DEFY PROGRAMS BEGIN THIS SUMMER Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) is a command sponsored drug demand reduction and comprehensive life skills program. DEFY aims to strengthen youth resiliency and family bonds. The program is a year-long, two-phased substance abuse prevention and comprehensive life skills program designed for 9-12 year olds. DEFY begins with a five-day residential or eight-day non-residential leadership program called Phase I that is held during the summer. During Phase I, youth receive education on substance abuse prevention, social skills, self-management skills, and fitness. A science-based curriculum provides the platform that helps youth work through goal setting, leadership and teamwork, and self- esteem enhancement. The DEFY summer leadership program provides our youth an opportunity to receive valuable lifelong skills. Parents must understand the DEFY program requires a year-long commitment to allow for the full benefit to their children. Families with 9-12 year olds are highly encouraged to enroll youth in local programs. A recent report on a program evaluation of DEFY showed that about 75 percent of parents surveyed saw improved youth life skill development and about 67 percent saw improvement in their child’s ability to avoid substance abuse and negative behaviors. For more information visit http://www.npc.navy.mil/support/21st_century_sailor/nadap/defy Call (901) 874-3300 to locate a program near you or find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/HQDEFYDEFY MAKE A DIFFERENCE AND BE A MENTOR AT YOUR LOCAL DEFY CAMP THIS SUMMER Want to make a lasting, positive impact on today’s youth? Want to learn new skills and be a positive adult role model for youth of families at your command? Mentoring is one of the core components of DEFY. Positive adult role models are needed to provide mentoring to participating youth. Command volunteers gain valuable knowledge and grow personally and professionally. In addition to the positive work DEFY does for our Navy families, volunteers learn new skills such as instructing, arranging logistics, coordinating administrative tasks, and managing program operations, all skills that are directly transferrable to their Navy jobs. Local command leadership is strongly encouraged to allow active duty members to participate as mentors and other support staff. Call (901) 874-3300 to locate a program near you or find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/HQDEFYDEFY

Related Documents